274 Outdoor Small Patio, Porch, Deck Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

The patio outside Wenes's house and gallery.
A mix of vintage finds and pieces designed by Mathesius, including a Cor-Ten steel fire pit on the second-floor deck, furnish a majority of the home.
Kevin Daly Architects created a geometric perforated, folding metal skin supported by an aluminum exoskeleton, which shades the two-story glazed courtyard-facing façade of this home in Venice, California.
Flanking the concrete wall is a carport and an entrance leading past a small, cedar-clad ancillary building for art projects and laundry.
This three-bedroom villa in the commune of Noto in Sicily has a front portion that’s raised a few feet off the ground and supported by three concrete structures. It's louvered exterior skin can be closed or opened fully, so guests can enjoy views of the sea from a distance.
A proposed wall of sliding glass doors morphed into a NanaWall system after the residents were assured the latter was more likely to be approved by the town. When folded back, the panels provide a seamless connection to the deck.
Bill Thompson sits on his deck.
Underneath the raised deck, a play structure was formed out of vertical grain cedar slats. Punched openings reveal the playfulness, and is topped by a glass guard with button clips and large starphire glass panels. The modeled, integral color stucco carries the industrial feel from the inside to the outside, and the Weatherwood Stain on the cedar finishes this look.
The yard is at the lowest elevation on the property, and was carved out to have a place for the family to play and relax. The turf is by Heavenly Greens. The space features clear heart cedar boards with a reactive stain by Weatherwood Stains.  The 30 foot green wall in implemented in segments and features built in drip irrigation. The mirrored solar reflector, which appears to have just dropped out of planetary orbit,  grabs southern light and reflects it into the home and exterior spaces.
Lucky Diaz spent three and a half months on this project, working all hours to get it done. “It was worth it,” he says. “To have Ella grow up in an original space is a gift that is beyond measure.”
Because the Collette residence, although by no means small by Dutch standards, is a compact 2,050 square feet, the inside/outside relationship is important. Glass walls front and back bring the outdoors in. Two-year-old Jort takes full advantage of the great outdoors.
To combat the site’s steep, uneven grade, Boeschenstein staggered a series of ipe decks around the two main volumes of the house. Atticus joins his brother, Bodhi, on the zigzag decks.
Doors and triple-glazed casement windows from Loewen work hard to form a tight thermal envelope.
With the help of Carver + Schickentanz Architects, Jason and Melissa Burnett were able to push their Carmel, California home's renovation from LEED Silver status to LEED Platinum-certified. With eco-friendly innovations like a retractable skylight for natural ventilation, double-pane windows to keep in air and heat, and sustainable landscaping with native vegetation, it's no wonder this mid-century-modern redesign is one of our green favorites. Click here to see the home's interior.
“Tel Aviv is different from the rest of Israel. This is one of the most modern cities in the world.” —Architect Pitsou Kedem
Next to the bathroom and above the living room, the terrace is open to sky, street, and the house itself. It has no roof, so daylight floods the entire wall-less building from the top down. The willow-green metal chairs are by Fermob.
The home’s interior design, featured in Vogue and widely celebrated, was an unusual foray into residential surrealism by Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret.
Outside, a set of Bertoia chairs offer an appealing perch around a vintage glass-and-metal table.
A pair of deck chairs from the Conran Shop brighten up a deck designed and built by Mark Congdon Landscape. Visible through the window are a Praying Mantis floor lamp from White Furniture and a fiberglass rocking chair from Modernica.
A covered porch on the south side provides comfortably shaded outdoor space, and its roof keeps the high-angle summer sun out of the house.
Several courtyards help bring greenery in. On the west side of the home, plants absorb sunlight and create another passive cooling feature. Crushed limestone pebbles and an exposed stone wall complete the lush space.
The back of the home glows at night as the giant, two-story glass doors swing open to remove the barrier between inside and out. A polished concrete patio deck and pool, along with a simple block perimeter wall, make smart use of available materials. The pool acts as a passive conditioning tool, cooling air before it enters the house. The block wall is positioned 31 inches from the house, creating a gap or "air chimney" that allows air to circulate up and away from the home, while simultaneously letting light filter down.
On the lower roof, cedar decking and flower beds define one of several outdoor gardening spaces. Part of her ongoing research into the livability of cities, Fitzgerald aimed to create landscaped areas that were “aesthetic, aromatic, educational, and productive.” The deck is bordered by an expanded aluminum mesh railing and black metal corrugated panels.
Continuing the material palette, the back patio is furnished with a custom granite-and-steel table and vintage Eames fiberglass chairs.
The front, middle, and rear yards are conceived as outdoor rooms. Pierre Kozely relaxes 

in the middle yard in a prototype of an outdoor furniture line by Pietrarte. A bronze Ganesh is on a raised pedestal in the middle of a small water feature.
A view out from the entrance lobby shows Koch leaving the house. He made the stairs' steel risers himself, with the help of his cousin, Chris Wilson.
Alan Koch stands with Oleana in the north-side entry court. The tree-stump table is one of several examples of the home's raw and hand-hewn details, which offset the cool steel structure. On the glass is a graphic by artists Sarah Morris and Liam Gillick.
The back, however, is a different story. The shape of the roof eave is designed to allow winter sun into the house while cutting out the hot summer sun.
Generous breezeways, walkways, and overhangs frame views beyond: “It’s like a promenade, with a forest at the end of the road,” says Deb.
A builder by trade, Ian  served as general contractor, working with designer Eric Walter of mw|works. Three box volumes, conceived as “spaces within spaces,” are configured around the open courtyard; local firm Wittman-Estes designed the hardscapes.
She removed the original light-blocking redwood stairway from the center of the house and replaced it with channel and bar grate treads.
The house sits on a corner lot, which makes the side yard (shown here) also a front yard. Five-and-a-half-year-old Maya (left) and two-and-a-half-year-old Yumi (right) play on the gravel while Mayuko, David, and Shota sit on the bench.
The hardscaping helps keep water use to a minimum. The Lais used gravel—accented by drought-tolerant bamboo—to create their side yard.
Yumi (left) and Maya (right) cheese around on the steps leading into the front door. Inside, there is ample space for removing and leaving one's shoes, another Japanese element.
Boasting sweeping downtown views, the roof deck reconciles complex geometry to accommodate a staircase, elevator, and usable social space. A fireplace is surrounded by outdoor seating from Paola Lenti.
Native plantings limit the need to use water for irrigation, while a vegetable garden offers a sustainable source of produce.
The deck is furnished with pieces from Design Within Reach.
The living room leads to a private outdoor patio. Before the renovation, the slightly below grade area was in plain sight to passersby, as it lays adjacent to the public walkway into the building. This less-than-ideal setup was addressed in the redesign by adding a slatted cedar perimeter fence, along with tall trees and shrubs. Clever hidden doors conceal patio storage under the entry walkway.
The residents decided to convert a koi pond on the property into a petite pool. Next steps for the renovators are updating the kitchen and increasing its size by expanding it into the mudroom and laundry room.
The addition, which includes a bedroom and a bathroom, also boasts an enclosed deck, a feature recommended for those with Alzheimer’s. “Ken used to do the landscaping here,” says Wibowo. “He also put many of the shingles on the original house.”
The couple's house, designed by architect L. Jane Hastings in the early 1970s, is located on a steeply sloped site that backs up to a state park.
Architects Simone Carneiro and Alexandre Skaff transformed a cramped São Paulo apartment into a mid-city refuge for Simone Santos.
Muennig’s Green House utilizes the western sun of the dramatic Big Sur coastline.
Resident Misha Bukowski plays with young Zachary in the walkway between the renovated buildings. The new units are clad in stained local cedar.
Playing off the work of artist James Turrell, as well as the front porch scheme prevalent in the South, an outside living room is half covered and half open to the leaf canopy overhead, where a pair of teak armchairs are clustered around a Laguna fire table from Restoration Hardware.
Landscape designer Vickie Cardaro used native grasses and plantings near the swimming pool (opposite). Cushions upholstered in Sunbrella fabric rest atop a Trex deck. The western red cedar ceiling extends through the deep eaves and covered seating area.
Scattershot openings in the single-story home omit a soft glow at dusk.
The material was gathered from soil with high sand content on the property as well as a second site in the vicinity. Certain volumes of the home consist of a concrete structure and brick masonry.

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