48 Outdoor Walkways Horizontal Fences, Walls Wood Fences, Walls Design Photos And Ideas

Christoph Kaiser, principal at Kaiserworks, reimagined a 1955 grain silo as a 340-square-foot home in Phoenix, Arizona. The corrugated, steel-clad house is 18 feet in diameter and features a 26-foot-high ceiling and a 17-foot operable slot window that fames views of the city. While the exterior displays a wonderfully industrial aesthetic, the interior is surprisingly cozy. "I wanted a warm interior, almost if you designed Wurlitzer to tend to all human needs and then slid it into one cylinder," says Kaiser, who employed built-in furniture, a spiral staircase, and a mezzanine bedroom with an in-wall projector for the ideal movie-watching experience.
The façade received fresh paint, as well as new impact resistant windows. The two-story addition rises behind it. “Given that the two-story wing was larger than the existing structure, it was critical for the new building to appear as lightweight as possible,” says the firm. “The reading of concrete, which is an almost universal residential structural system in South Florida, would have been too heavy against the reading of the low-slung wood roof of the original house.”
A cozy reading nook on the rooftop.
The home's lush surroundings.
A peaceful corner of Casa Meleku.
Nestled in Seattle's East Capitol Hill neighborhood, this modern residence "is an economical, efficient, low-maintenance, and modern version of a traditional Seattle house—one with primary living spaces on the main floor and three bedrooms above," state the architects.
Archier maintained the old brick from the existing part of the house to clearly illustrate the relationship of old with new.
The kitchen bar counter extends out to the patio, creating a great space for entertaining.
Why build a Passive House? "The obvious answer is low heating and cooling bills, but we find people most appreciate the other benefits, like consistent thermal comfort, sound proofing, and air quality," say the architects.
The ceiling of the lower level is shou sugi ban cedar siding to match the exteriors.
Located along the heavy steel back wall, the entry pathway is one of the home's several interstitial spaces designed to reinforce connection with nature. The soffit and wall siding are maibec wood.
The 2,466 square foot, two-level home features three bedrooms and two-and-a-half baths.
Custom Bioretention Planter (Landscape Architecture by CampionHruby)
The light well that allows for sunlight AND an addition above
The remote, desert enclave sits just 700 feet from the tallest building in downtown Phoenix.
Chong left enough space in the 16-foot-wide backyard for a garden and comfortable dining area.
Viewing Decks and Infinity Pool
An original 1957 California Ranch by Kemper/Nomland has been painted black and transformed into a pool/guest house.
Garden Balcony
Entry
A fountain that spills into a palm sheltered pond at the entry.
The ADU shares the backyard of the main home, but gabion retaining walls (rocks in wire cages) and an elevated terrace gives it an intimate space of its own.
A rear view of the narrow house shows how Chong twisted the house’s volumes to bring daylight into each room.
You'd never designed for special needs children before the Bancroft residence, how did you interpret the clients' needs?

Jack Hawkins, architect: I would like to say I did tons of research, but I didn't. I went with the parents' lead. I took most of my design cues from them. They're the immediate caregivers, they know their children and about autism. They did all the research and told me what was important.
Architect: YAMAMAR Design, Location: San Francisco, California
Shadows of the pergola at rear yard patio
Swimming pool at rear yard
“Sustainability is very important to us,” lead architect Heather Dubbeldam says. “It is easy to design with passive systems, to use passive sustainable principles to influence the design and layout of the house.” Her team reduced the need for air conditioning and artificial lighting through carefully positioned doors and windows that draw in natural light and breeze. New insulation, low-flow plumbing fixtures, and low-energy lighting also minimize the homeowners’ dependence on utilities.
A gently winding set of exposed aggregate concrete pads leads to the Wabi House’s front door. Mariscal sought to “hide the house behind a dense forest front yard.” As the crape myrtles grow in, they will further filter the home’s facade.
More than just a clever cover, the ipe wood shell of Mark Erman's spa, thanks to its 40-foot tracks, niftily navigates the rocky straights between spa shelter, dapper deck, and bespoke buffet table.
Innovative path lighting
An asymmetrical mailbox incorporates mid-century geometry and new building materials into the front approach.
Changing the vehicular approach provides for direct garage access and allows for the drought-tolerant landscaping to contribute to both privacy and an enhanced streetscape.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.