73 Outdoor Trees Slope Design Photos And Ideas

Viewing Decks and Infinity Pool
Designed by Los Angeles-based creative agency Folklor in partnership with SKG Investments, Native retains the previous motel’s charm with original features like the stone fireplace and concrete aggregate floors. Check-in features design-conscious updates, such as a Jerry Johnson sling rocker and chair and a wood bar sofa from Early Work.
Intended to be cutting-edge prototypes for modern living, the experiment ended up involving many of America's greatest architects, including Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, and Eero Saarinen—and had a major impact on modernist residential architecture.
The Autonomous Tent is available to book for $495 plus tax per night. To make a reservation, visit the Treebones Resort website.
An outdoor terrace lounge on the slope of the property.
Entry to private spaces at rear of pool house.
A large porch projects out from the main building.
Cloaked House, as 3r Ernesto Pereira named it, blends into its hillside location.
Existing trees poke through the large patio.
The roof is the only solid element.
Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.
Located in Rutherford, California, Quintessa Winery has a longstanding commitment to creating modern architecture that complements rather than competes with the landscape. When the Huneeus family sought to add three pavilions for private wine tastings to the estate, they wanted the structures to offer protection from the sun, wind, and heat without imposing on the land or coming between the visitor and the vineyard. Greg Warner, Principal/Owner, LEED AP, and Michael McCabe, Associate Principal,  LEED AP, from Walker Warner Architects worked on the project. "Our response was a series of three 250-square-foot open air roofed structures, set amid the oak forest on a ridge-line overlooking the rolling vineyard-covered hills and the lake beyond," they say. "The clean, modern lines and visual simplicity of the pavilions serve as a backdrop to the tasting experience and as a frame to the landscape beyond while also sheltering visitors from the elements." Lutkso Associates served as the landscape architects for the pavilions.
With respect to the sloping meadow, the home is designed to coexist and therefore never breaks the ridgeline.
A small Arabian stud and a champion English Pointer live on the site, where mountain leopards and baboons also prowl. Before building, Herman and van Gass cleared the land of invasive species like the black wattle, an acacia tree.
Herman describes the shape of a sleeping dragon nestled in the mountains. In keeping with a Feng Shui philosophy, he intentionally left a hole in the building to allow the beast a clear view.
Guests can relax by the pool and soak in the views or hike into the mountains, following a creek into an ancient forest.
The Courmayeur Ski & Snowboard School's home is part of a cluster of buildings located in the ski area of Plan Checrouit, at the foot of Mont Blanc. LEAPfactory’s design for the facility, while crisp and contemporary, echoes the design of its neighbors, particularly their asymmetrical gables.
The property, situated on a steep bluff overlooking the San Francisco Bay, includes a main house with a deck, a pool, an outdoor kitchen, and a boathouse.
The architects designed every gesture of the home as a complement to the landscape, including the slot windows that frame views of the surrounding foliage and the walkway that follows the bedrock of the cliff.
Perched over a cliff face, the hooded deck of the Gambier Residence reads like a ship’s prow over Howe Sound, the scenic waters near Vancouver.
The Juvet is tucked into the woodsy corner of a classic Norwegian farm on the banks of the rushing Valldola River. The farm has existed here since at least the 1500s.
Originally designed by Jack Hall in the 1960s for Robert Hatch, an editor of The Nation and his wife, the
View from Sunfish Lake
The home extends over the rocky shore of the island in a manner reminiscent of Wright's Fallingwater.
Oriented to absorb the afternoon sun, floor-to-ceiling doors comprise two-thirds of the home’s west-facing walls, which open to an elevated deck overlooking Island Bay. Combined with extra-thick building insulation, this passive element provides sufficient heating for the home, even during winter months—a true feat given the region’s cold seasonal winds.
To avoid the typical white barn form found throughout Napa Valley, Fernandez turned to the rustic architectural traditions of western mining communities for inspiration.
In the winter, the polished concrete floor, which faces a large south-facing opening, accumulates heat from the sun during the day and keeps this heat indoors at night.
Cedar planks on the exterior walls are dyed black, and on the indoor walls, these cedar planks are dyed white.
Both the front door and garage are accessible from street level. The floor is cantilevered out over a concrete pile foundation and garden far below.
The deck, fashioned from ipe, was built around one of the property’s many granite outcroppings. An earthen roof was planted with the same varieties of sedum that were added to the front of the cottage.
The facade of the three-bedroom house sports a series of extruded pine boxes, which create sheltered spaces that stand up to the area’s fluctuating weather. The owners, Isaac Pineus and Andrew Duncanson, spend summers here with their twin sons.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

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