98 Outdoor Grass Wood Patio, Porch, Deck Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

To create the feel of a seaside retreat, Mitsuori Architects included Australian Ironbark wood slats on the rear-facing wall of this rorenovated this Victoiran heritage home in Melbourne. Ironbark is an incredibly durable hardwood that turns a beautiful silvery-gray as it weathers over time.
Iceland prefab pioneers Tryggvi Thorsteinsson and Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir of Minarc built this Culver City family home with mnmMOD  – a customizable, locally manufactured building system of prefabricated panels the duo designed, which minimizes energy consumption and reduces a home’s carbon footprint. Made with a blend of 30 percent recycled steel and cradle-to-cradle certified extruded polystyrene, mnmMOD components can be assembled with just a screw gun.
Because the Collette residence, although by no means small by Dutch standards, is a compact 2,050 square feet, the inside/outside relationship is important. Glass walls front and back bring the outdoors in. Two-year-old Jort takes full advantage of the great outdoors.
When building such a modest structure in a large landscape, designer and client often had to defend their vision to their collaborators. “We knew this house was going to be for Maggie and she would live there alone,” designer Lauren Moffitt says. “But people are always projecting for future resale. Putting in the smallest size of anything—to any subcontractor, it’s just not reasonable.”
Doors and triple-glazed casement windows from Loewen work hard to form a tight thermal envelope.
A cantilevered eave provides shading during warm, summer months.
Villa H | garden facade
Leading from the communal pool area to the more intimate olive tree grove, the intricate “woven” ipe boardwalk plays with a variety of lineweights and patterns. All of the wood used for the project is reclaimed.
The metal Grillage chair on the deck is by François Azambourg for Ligne Roset.
Cantilevered deck from Lake Michigan shore beach side.
Courtyard featuring the Live Oak Tree.  The neutral tones on the homes exterior act as a canvas to nature showing a play of light on the exterior of the home throughout the day
It is all about contemplating the nature

The main living space and the entry-level interior of the house offer a view of the horizon, sea and local topography. The house features an impossible light steel frame and concrete footings to support the cedar box that contains the living space. From the living room, the owners can capture a 180 degrees view, due to the panoramic windows. The bedroom offers an axial and longer view across the cliff that parallels with the coast.
Once in the pool, however, it feels more like the ocean. As with a shelf, the bottom drops quickly from three feet to the nine-foot deep end. A set of three long, shallow steps sits above the middle depth like a sandbar at high tide, the top tread covered with just a few inches of water.
Private garden with deck
To save money, the main patio was updated with fresh decking, but the metal awning was kept intact.
Entrance view
CAUCASO
The facade of the three-bedroom house sports a series of extruded pine boxes, which create sheltered spaces that stand up to the area’s fluctuating weather. The owners, Isaac Pineus and Andrew Duncanson, spend summers here with their twin sons.
Jamie built the decking, of ipe, to accommodate a tree by the entrance to the garage.
Renowned designer and architect Jens Risom sourced parts from a catalog for his customized A-frame and had them delivered in pieces to his remote island site off Rhode Island, helped to raise the aesthetic profile of modular construction.
A single crepe myrtle, which sports red blossoms in summer, defines the courtyard.
Architect Prineas remodelled this minimalist residence in Lane Cove, in Sydney’s Lower North Shore, with a rear extension connected to the main house via a small link that creates two internal courtyards. The house had plenty of strategically positioned large windows and skylights that connect it with the tree canopies above it.
The renovation and two-story extension of this 1880 Adelaide bungalow includes a 23-foot rear lot with a pool.
Speaking to his original design, architect Saul Zaik says, “We were really just building boxes with a bunch of windows but experimenting with how you integrated indoor and outdoor spaces.” The house has seven different openings to the exterior, allowing different courtyard or patio settings for a range of outdoor activities, including seating for a gathering on the street-facing side. The Milfords hired Lilyvilla Gardens for the landscaping around the house, including variegated bluestone steps with thyme joints.
Backyard
Twenty-foot-wide doors from Solar Innovations offer easy access to the deck. “Solar Innovations was the only manufacturer at that time that had a pocket multi-slider with a good ADA threshold,” says architect Erick Mikiten. “They almost look like steel, but are thermally broken aluminum.”
Harper sits on the porch just off the entrance. James notes that the children spend their time “swimming in the dam, feeding the chickens, and riding their ponies or bikes. It’s really just the simple stuff that we had when we grew up in the late ’70s and ’80s.
Up top, a verdant green roof of native grasses, wildflowers and fruits creates an oasis.
“We have all these different destinations,” says Sardinas, a writer who works from her home office. “I’ll be working, get stuck on a passage, and take a break to go read outside.” On the lower roof, red Vegetal chairs by Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec for Vitra provide moments for repose.
The family spends summers and school vacations at the bach. New Zealand's relatively mild winters mean they use the house year-round.
Bach to the BeachWith authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular.
The Byron Bay House lies within 100 meters of the beach. Archiblox designed a transportable structure that’s able to relocate in case of flooding or erosion.
The landscaped backyard acts as a second, open-air living space between the home and garage studio. The cladding on the addition is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Iron Mountain, and the deck is stained western red cedar.
Pool, wooden deck and garden.

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