94 Outdoor Vertical Fences, Walls Trees Design Photos And Ideas

The roof is sheathed in asphalt shingles and is complemented by charred timber siding.
The building itself integrates into the street and is sensitive to its adjoining dwellings.
The burnt ash exterior timber cladding by Woodform Architectural features alternating thicknesses.
The architects preserved the front of the house, but incorporated three bedrooms, a dining room, and lounge area into the new floor plan. They renovated the bathroom and laundry room and built a new powder room.
Named the Crisp House after its first inhabitant Edward Crisp—an Irish brewer who founded a brewery on a street near the property—the house was in fact a prefab timber cottage that was imported from England when the early English settlers arrived in Australia in the 1850s.
The lot is at the end of a cul-de-sac, very private, and totally unassuming from the front circular driveway entrance.
The modern palapa nestles into the naturally rocky slope. Vegetation is encouraged to grow over the structure.
La Binocle is perched high atop a hill, maximizing views of the valley below.
The home's charred timber exterior resembles a crow's plumage.
The facade of the cottage beautifully blends both past and present.
The couple source ideas for their garden from their trips to Japan.
"Unlike its neighbors, this house is not fenced off at its street perimeter," notes the firm. "A meadow of native grasses flows from the sidewalk with existing oaks, redwoods, and newly planted birch trees flowing inside and outside of the curving wooden wall."
Travertine flooring by New Marble Company continues from the interiors to the outdoor courtyards to further emphasize indoor/outdoor living.
A covered walkway connects the detached garage and guest suite with the main structure.
The massive curving wall serves as an alternative to the perimeter fence that's common to the neighborhood, an area which the architects says has developed a hodgepodge of architectural styles.
The spacious backyard features mature trees, including avocado, that shade the home in the afternoon.
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A modern, barn-style house in Byron Bay, Australia.
An outdoor bathroom for lazy summer soaks.
Why build a Passive House? "The obvious answer is low heating and cooling bills, but we find people most appreciate the other benefits, like consistent thermal comfort, sound proofing, and air quality," say the architects.
The second seating area features furniture from All Modern.
Inspired by Japanese pocket gardens, the gardens are flanked on three sides by concrete and one wall of full glass that lights sitting areas adjacent to the lower level bedrooms.
On the entry side, the house is a single-story long gable structure.
Pictured on the left is the former cottage that's located on the north side of the house. It houses two bedrooms, a kitchenette, dining area, bathroom, and a mud room.
The pergola was removed, the exterior wall opened up, and a new dining room added. The 12-foot-long sliding pocket doors manufactured by Western Window Systems recede all the way into the wall for total indoor/outdoor flow. The new patio received cement tile—the Arc pattern from Clé Tile—its black and white palette coordinating with the new white paint and black window frames of the exterior.
"To accentuate [the] seamless connection to the outdoors, we created a pair of retractable glass walls that meet at the corner. The effect when open is one of completely dissolving the corner and creating a feeling of being surrounded by nature," describes Maniscalco.
The large roof overhang protects the newly added amoeba-shaped patio and fire pit. The house sits on a flat 6,400-square-foot lot.
The unique residence features a 1,500-square-foot deck.
“We wanted to ‘cap’ the dwelling with a generous, almost sweeping canopy that would keep the majority of the high sun exposure areas in shade,” says Pande. “We also played with the roof volume to break free from the constraints of a typical ‘box modern’ home.”
“We wanted to ‘cap’ the dwelling with a generous, almost sweeping canopy that would keep the majority of the high sun exposure areas in shade. We also played with the roof volume to break free from the constraints of a typical ‘box modern’ home,” says Pande.
The home's low-maintenance Cor-Ten steel exterior can be easily washed down when needed.
Sections of the walls along the south-facing deck are painted bright blue to complement the sauna's pinkish-red door.
The cabin's upper volume cantilevers over a wooden deck.
This private outdoor space would be otherwise unavailable within a hillside home.
This is the terrace which is just off the master bedroom.
"My client’s highest priority was building a pool," says Hannah. "The property had 2 flat acres—rare in this neighborhood—which was ideal for a pool. We were able to do a very simple and modern granite pool with a beautiful contrast of concrete and decking... and still have room in the back yard for a giant vegetable garden."
The backyard gives a clear view of the modular construction.
The home is situated on a spacious 9,000-square-foot lot and features a large, private patio, as well as planting beds and several producing fruit trees along the flat lawn area.
There is even a private meditation garden off the master with a zen pond, waterfall feature, and a hot tub.
The newly landscaped yard is virtually maintenance free and features modern concrete hardscapes, as well as wood decking—perfect for alfresco entertaining.
The cantilevered wing provides privacy by obscuring views into the yard.
The lot is almost 10,000 square feet, and the fully enclosed backyard space is perfect for entertaining and features a kidney-shaped swimming pool and a hot tub.
view to new addition from rear lawn
The south-facing deck leads out to the sauna.
Outdoor area/balcony
The spacious pool area is peaceful and private.
A backyard garden.
A 70’ infinity-edge pool and spa bear the illusion of spilling dramatically over the hillside.
New addition and patio from outdoor garden: the concrete terrace extends into the garden, and receives daylight over the house from the southern sun.
A Durand Oak tree on one side of the main living area.
The rear elevation of the home faces North, taking advantage of natural light via extensive doors and clerestory windows tucked under the eaves.
Designed by Los Angeles-based creative agency Folklor in partnership with SKG Investments, Native retains the previous motel’s charm with original features like the stone fireplace and concrete aggregate floors.
The structure is built entirely of reinforced, poured in-situ concrete, except for the metallic pillars on opposite ends of the home.
Built with thick stone walls that create two horizontal planes in between the forest, the house has a roof made of glass and steel.
This 1949 inter-war modernist house in New South Wales was renovated by Sam Crawford Architects, Conway Atkins House in a way that paid homage to it's heritage with nautical and transportation art deco elements.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.