511 Office Study Desk Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it be a study, library, or craft room, the modern office is a tranquil place for you to flex your creativity, conduct meetings, and carry out day-to-day business. Cram the shelves with your favorite books, put the table in the middle of your room, or splurge on the perfect desk lamp—a great office should reflect your personal taste and inspire your best work.

Ali’s artworks line the studio desk and a painting by his son decorates the wall.
Large windows in the office help create the couple’s desired effect of permeability throughout the home.
A painting by Mayumi Oda commands the wall over Ginger’s desk.
Artful cutouts allow the branch of the tree to snake through the wall, making for a dreamy place to get some work done.
The tree house is just big enough for a desk and a chair, with a generous window looking into the leaves.
An office nook is tucked behind sliding doors in the bedroom closet.
The mezzanine was extended by 130 square feet and now holds a study organized by Rakks shelves.
The living area and the office are arranged on split levels, adding an open, convivial quality to the home. A small staircase is incorporated into the desk and accesses the living area.
Originally intended as a play structure for the couple's daughter, the tea house instead became an office, stocked with Charles and Ray Eames-designed furniture in honor of the nearby Eames House.
The children’s rooms both feature custom, built-in desks for studying and homework. “There’s a language of reveals and quirks and integrated pulls—handleless drawers and doors—that is consistent even if the form and function of the particular detail is different,” says architect Nicholas Fiore.
In her work area, a sliding panel opens to offer Justine a view of the living area below. “When you’re in the house, you’re aware of the whole house, which I really like,” she says.
A window in the office purposefully frames a large cactus, inviting the Sonoran desert landscape into the home.
A homework area in the living wing offers a dedicated space for the two children to do schoolwork. The junction between the steel, concrete, and timber is representative of the interior palette.
The north-facing rear yard is located on the lower ground floor, and its uniquely challenging shape lead to this project being referred to as the Triangle.
This Toronto workspace designed by architect Anya Moryoussef features an 18-foot-long built-in floating desk with integrated storage.
The Workstation Cabin is fully equipped with power, air conditioning, heating, and an internet connection.
A dramatic black-painted wall is a backdrop for the home office. The renovation has compelled the couple to move into the home full-time and rent their Seattle townhome.
A wall on the second level features a built-in bookcase with a reading nook.
The office on the second level is outfitted with a built-in desk and bookcase that spans the length of the walls.
Ben Koush’s studio office faces the street and features a sleek modern desk he designed, as well as built-in bookshelves filled with colorful books and art.
The Bracy Cottage — Office Alcove
The garage interior was completely redone with a new concrete floor, glass doors, and practical storage.
A second bedroom doubles as an office, should a renter prefer to use it that way. Oni balances earthen and elegant decor elements, emphasizing a small, personal collection throughout the ADU.
Curved green panelled joinery towards the study hideaway
On the other side of the wardrobe lies an office space.
A built-in desk creates an office area for two at one end of the living room.
A Mash Studio wall-mounted desk offers a place to study in this Chicago family home.
Clever joinery units throughout the home are strategically located to avoid unnecessary clutter. The long study on the ground floor—which runs in front of the children’s bedrooms—has plenty of desk space for all four children to do homework and study.
The study on the first floor is in the more private principal bedroom wing of the home. Like the rest of the rooms, it features bespoke American oak timber joinery.
The corner library takes color inspiration from the facade.
The office features a nearly full-width picture window in front of built-in desks. Views extend beyond the immediate cove to the Atlantic Ocean and horizon.
At the corner with the desk, the building is angled in two planes. The desktop is made from slightly burned Douglas fir.
A sleeping loft above the second-level office accommodates sleepovers with visiting grandchildren.
The second level showcases built-in cabinetry and an office area crafted from cedar.
An office space is tucked behind a sliding glass door at the end of the kitchen run.
With the Murphy bed folded up, ample space is given to other programs.
Window counters are relevant for serious work or casual break-out areas.
The furniture, such as the tables and benches, are designed with wheels so as to enable different configurations.
In Edinburgh’s historic New Town, a Georgian town house had its upper floor redone with black-painted OSB that still expresses its variegated texture.
“My grandfather, George Fasullo, was an architect who died before I was born,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “My mom used both of our drawings as wallpaper in the secondary living space.” During the lockdown, Bollom formed an extended bubble with his parents, and he and his wife, also an architect, used the space as an office.
When folded up, the built-in desk spans the width of the office.
The Deacon also serves as a central place for guests to hang out.
The upstairs landing features an office, sitting area, and enough storage for a family of four.
Above the kitchen, the mezzanine level holds a workspace with a view. The sharp pitch of the roof opens up the space below it, so this area doesn’t feel cramped. Note the reoccurring motif of rounded joinery in the main spaces, which plays off of the angular moments.
A timber screen divides the library/study within the living space. It can be opened up to make a direct connection, or left closed for a layer of privacy. This was a key element of the scheme, as it creates a direct line of view through the living spaces from the sunken courtyard to the water.
In Guang’s office, Chen designed a lacquered desk to join the Philippe Starck chair, Louis Poulsen desk lamp, and Chinese folk "drum stools."
The pink desk nook references the cherry blossoms that bloom in Japan every spring.