246 Office Chair Storage Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it be a study, library, or craft room, the modern office is a tranquil place for you to flex your creativity, conduct meetings, and carry out day-to-day business. Cram the shelves with your favorite books, put the table in the middle of your room, or splurge on the perfect desk lamp—a great office should reflect your personal taste and inspire your best work.

An office nook is tucked behind sliding doors in the bedroom closet.
Jocie’s new office overlooks the ocean.
In her work area, a sliding panel opens to offer Justine a view of the living area below. “When you’re in the house, you’re aware of the whole house, which I really like,” she says.
This Toronto workspace designed by architect Anya Moryoussef features an 18-foot-long built-in floating desk with integrated storage.
A dramatic black-painted wall is a backdrop for the home office. The renovation has compelled the couple to move into the home full-time and rent their Seattle townhome.
The garage interior was completely redone with a new concrete floor, glass doors, and practical storage.
A longstanding relationship between FMD Architects and CCB Envico made this project possible.
Study hideaway
Curved green panelled joinery towards the study hideaway
On the other side of the wardrobe lies an office space.
The office features a nearly full-width picture window in front of built-in desks. Views extend beyond the immediate cove to the Atlantic Ocean and horizon.
The custom white oak-and-steel desk and cabinets are by Filtch, topped with a charcoal-finished white oak slab. Matching Fenton and Fenton desk chairs offer the homeowners the opportunity to work side by side.
Simple office furniture in primary colors stands out against marine-blue walls and a white window shade.
With the Murphy bed folded up, ample space is given to other programs.
In Edinburgh’s historic New Town, a Georgian town house had its upper floor redone with black-painted OSB that still expresses its variegated texture.
The upstairs landing features an office, sitting area, and enough storage for a family of four.
Above the kitchen, the mezzanine level holds a workspace with a view. The sharp pitch of the roof opens up the space below it, so this area doesn’t feel cramped. Note the reoccurring motif of rounded joinery in the main spaces, which plays off of the angular moments.
In Guang’s office, Chen designed a lacquered desk to join the Philippe Starck chair, Louis Poulsen desk lamp, and Chinese folk "drum stools."
The pastel color palette is—consciously or unconsciously—influenced by Japan’s kawaii culture. White walls and concrete floors make the colors pop.
Custom-milled built-ins provide ample storage.
The open-layout design is completely custom. The office area looks toward downtown Los Angeles through floor-to-ceiling windows and sliders.
"I've always loved the way buildings look when they're under construction, and the walls of the office are basically like open framing," Davis says.
The office features bespoke timber shelves, desks, and cabinets crafted from white oak. “My wife and I designed each piece of millwork, and we reviewed each interior elevation for function,” says Joseph. “Our senior project architect prepared the fabrication shop drawings, and we hired the fabricator directly, which allowed us to bypass the costly middle man and gave us complete quality control. We then hired a local carpenter to install and then finish the millwork on-site.”
The upper and lower level of the home feature exposed hemp panels.
"Stephanie used every inch of crawl space for built-ins so there is a ton of storage," shares Hixton. Dyer also added a washer and dryer discretely set behind doors for added convenience for the couple and any future caretaker.
Charlotte Perriand’s LC7 chair stands in the bedroom’s office nook, which also has a desk lamp scooped up from a Marseille flea market.
A built-in desk makes good use of the small footprint in the study.
“We all use the open study far more than we envisioned, and it functions well as a second lounge space for visiting kids,” say the owners.
In the parsonage volume, the floors are American oak with a black finish. An integrated desk designates a place to work from home.
While initially only Danielle occupied the office for her design and art direction work, Bryan now shares the space with her. Here's a peek of her desk.
Upgrade your live/work situation with these creative home office designs that suit a variety of needs.
The clients' request for a more flexible space that could accommodate guests and a home office was met by removing the wall and building closets in each corner. The original space featured a sloped ceiling, which was preserved, while two custom day beds make room for a centered desk and chair.
The entire unit is a custom design, fitted with drawers and a writable magnetic surface—just like a proper office.
The wife’s workspace is in the dining area. Her desk is concealed behind closet doors and can be neatly tucked away as needed.
Heliotrope Architects created a lofty space that allows the residents to connect fully with the outdoors while at work.
The client needed a spot to work from home, so Astrain designed this angled desk that works with the quirky geometry of the home. "When the client saw it being installed, she liked it so much she wanted more of them, and asked for another by her bed and by the entrance," says Astrain.
A look at the office workstations and conference room designed by Studio Zerbey Architecture & Design.
This detached home office unit by FORWARD Design | Architecture features a fire engine red exterior and ample storage within.
The office of Inwood Place offers a quiet reprieve from the hubbub of daily life.
The home office of 19th St. Residence by Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects peeks into the lush side yard.
The upper floor layout was rejiggered so that the kids' bedroom could be relocated, and now a cantilevered addition at the back of the house hosts a library space with full-height glass capturing a view to the backyard. The built-in shelving has a rich blue laminate, and the tiled wall to the left denotes the light well into the kitchen.
A workspace was installed below the preserved hutch cabinets. The staircase was also kept. Wood lines new openings, in contrast with retained casework.
This room is located in a brick addition that the architects estimate was built in the 1950s. "Because this space was an addition and of a different material and construction than the original home, we felt exposing and celebrating this difference would be best," says Hazelbaker. They did so by removing a built-in closet, exposing the brick wall, and installing the Vitsoe system that doesn’t obscure the difference between old and new.
A desk area makes use of space next to the kitchen—in case one of the daughters has homework.
The guest house also features a quiet work area, complete with a custom-built, L-shaped desk.
The desk can fold out and accommodate two people.
An upstairs desk can provide a place for Jen’s work or their kids’ homework. When not in use, it disappears into the wall.
Colors, materials, and patterns on the interior echo those on the exterior. A large window and skylight help the structure feel connected to the backyard.
A small nook in the triangular projection of the floor plan is utilized as a home office with a custom-built desk.
The office features built-in bookshelves and storage, plus a table by Jardin.
A peek inside the light-filled office on the north side of the house.
The upper-level office, where the materiality of the Douglas Fir ceiling has the most impact, takes on the feeling of a true cabin in the woods.
This stand-up study nook with built-in storage can also be used as a bar.