223 Living Room Track Lighting Sofa Design Photos And Ideas

Original red oak floors were stripped and finished with a matte sealer to maintain a raw, unfinished look.
Black-and-white photography lends a nuanced touch to a partition wall re-clad in plywood.
Art by Zoe Pawlak sits on the mantle with an Eames Bird from Herman Miller.
Cuddington had the drywall removed to reveal the house’s original structural framework, which in turn screens the living areas while also allowing visual connection with the front door. "Having the ability to just swap out [the drywall] and open it up gave the home a sense of arrival and a preface to the type of materials that were being used in the project," says Cuddington.
The team removed the dropped ceiling and attic above to expose the tongue-and-groove paneling and the supports at the roof. A Swan Chair by Fritz Hansen sits with the client’s sofa and USM media cabinet.
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
A deck opens up to the west from the main living space, and it’s the perfect place to watch the sunset. A long, low window at the rear of the space frames the tree line.
The clients fell in love with the double-sided Cheminees Philippe fireplace, which had been used in a previous Modscape project they had seen. “It works nicely in this home to help subtly define each space, and it’s a stunning feature,” says Modscape managing director Jan Gyrn.
The living spaces are designed to remain clutter-free and open toward the view. Services, including the mudroom, laundry, and family bathroom, are located in a separate wing to the rear of the home.
Operable windows and doors on the east and west facades allow for effective cross ventilation across the narrow footprint of the home.
Like the second-floor living room, the more private living area in the master bedroom boasts a fireplace and expansive views.
The large master bedroom can also be used as an additional living area by the parents and the children.
The second floor is where all three generations come together to eat, play, work, and gather around the fireplace.
Stairs lead down to the home's three private bedrooms, as well as a dorm-like sleeping area and a small recreation space.
Another lounge area is located in the sound-proof basement, providing a spot to enjoy the custom stereo system. "The rug truly captures the ’80s love of geometric shapes," says Lorenz.
Minimalist yet cozy, this cluster-style home in a Norwegian forest offers plenty of nooks to get comfortable in.
Earth tones adorn the living room, which is anchored by a Sisal rug from ABC Carpet. A low-slung Dune sofa from Poliform is an invitation to lounge.
Stairs and storage space separate the kitchen and dining area from the living room.
The stair treads are finished with bright yellow cork tiles. "The clients were comfortable with the introduction of as much color as possible," says architect Ian Moore.
The original timber trusses are a dominant element in the living space. They had been painted white during an earlier renovation, and the design team decided to repaint them instead of stripping them back to raw timber. A new corrugated steel ceiling has been inserted between the trusses. Small perforations in the steel absorb sound into the acoustic insulation installed above.
Paint was removed from the original brick walls wherever possible, leaving an irregular patina. The smooth, clean finish of the new walls contrasts with the color and texture of the bricks.
The skylight measures 18 feet by nine feet, and was divided into seven panels. "Their objective was to see the sky everywhere," Maydan adds.
The house’s small size and compact footprint necessitated some clever spatial arrangements—like the hidden kitchen—to make the space feel bigger.
The home’s interior is minimal and streamlined, with classic modern furnishings and polished concrete floors.
Exposed hemlock beams form a series of proscenia that distribute the roof load.
An accent pillow isn't the only place where neutral palettes can get some color. In this Hollywood Hills living room, Pickens creates a cohesive palette by using the same shades on the walls, rug, and side tables.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
A macramé wall hanging serves as large-scale, textural artwork in this sitting room.
The living room features a Cheminee Philippe wood-burning fireplace, which has a large heating capacity. By placing it below the void, it is able to heat both the downstairs and common areas upstairs.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
While thoughtfully updated for modern-day living, the loft retains a trove of original details, including built-in cabinetry that was part of the original classroom space. One can imagine the units filled with microscopes or specimens during the building's schoolhouse past.
Conveniently located near downtown Detroit, Apartment No. 39 is the latest Leland Lofts condo to hit the market. Offered for $324,000, the 1,360-square-foot space features a spacious open layout and was recently treated to a top-down renovation. Restored hardwoods run throughout.
When the homeowners of this 1960 home in Portland’s Southwest Hills bought the property in 2009, they became the new owners of a lot of white carpeting, tired woodwork, dated wallpaper, and lackluster storage. Over time, they came to wish for a home that better suited their lives, but didn’t want to sacrifice the excellent midcentury bones. A two-pronged renovation became the answer to their problems. For the first phase completed in 2016, Fieldwork Design + Architecture remodeled the main floor. The firm swapped out the white carpeting for warm cork flooring, then strategically inserted variegated cedar planking. Fireplace surrounds received new plaster to bring in a subtle, earthy texture. Sharp black accents, whether via dining chairs or new patio doors, add definition. Fieldwork replaced the trim around the windows with CVG fir and added variegated cedar planking for warmth and texture. For the second phase of the transformation, which wrapped in 2019, Annie Wise of Annie Wise Design stepped in for a gut remodel of the kitchen and master bathroom, with the goal of ensuring any changes remained consistent with what had already been done.
Large slabs of slate were used throughout the home for flooring, adding a natural element.
"The balcony is kept at the same height as the interior floor and built with similar materials and colors to extend the interior space," says the firm. "Additionally, the interior floor looks like a part of the balcony, thereby erasing the interior–exterior boundary. This design provides residents the feeling of living in nature even though they are actually living in a skyscraper."
"The curve at the ceiling blurs the boundary between roofs and wall," says the firm.
Reveals at the ceiling highlight the wooden roof detail in this Taiwan apartment remodel.
"The bold concrete forms [in DS House] create a blank backdrop for the reinstatement of the indigenous landscape after bushfires...triggered a requirement for the majority of the vegetation to be removed,
Inside the southern pavilion of this Australian home, there is the primary open-plan living space, a study, a laundry room, and a guest bedroom and bath. A streamlined kitchen is defined by its white cabinetry against the surrounding cedar walls. Jackson Clements Burrows Architects led the project.
Inspired by Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetics, the modern Orchid tiny house features an interior clad in three-quarter-inch maple plywood.
Another 20 loft homes are available in the concrete building starting on the second floor. These spacious residences will feature wide white oak flooring, along with restored concrete beams and columns.
A look at the spacious family room, which features additional built-ins, wooden beams and paneling, as well as clerestory windows that invite long rays of natural light into the space.
Smartly tucked underneath the stairs is a full bath.
The windows, which tower over 16 feet, provide plenty of natural light for the cabin.
The living room boasts a bright blue epoxy “rug” and tables fashioned from logs.
The main living area follows the same minimalist style, with enough room for a large table, sofa, and built-in work area. A large sliding door leads out to the rear deck.
The Artichoke light in bronze from Louis Poulsen joins Vitra cork stools and leather couches from Borge Mogensen.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.