124 Living Room Recessed Lighting Shelves Design Photos And Ideas

Floor-to-ceiling glass melds the tiny building with its surroundings, while nine-foot-tall ceilings give it a spacious feel.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The interior of the bubblewrap addition.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
Having spent more time at home in recent months, Nina and her family are truly experiencing the "essence" of her design, she says. Their library corner, a space that was once underused, has become a place of respite for the family where they can gather on the Nanimarquina Rangoli rug and listen to records.
Clever arrangements of furniture delineate the spaces in the loft’s open floor plan. In the living area, a hand-knitted Donna Wilson Motley ottoman sits opposite a B&B Italia Charles sofa and Arco lamp.
The family room couch is tucked into a nook to create a cozy retreat that still has views past the atrium to the backyard and kitchen.
A spiral stair at the center of the living space leads downstairs to the lower "basement" level. The small spiral stair was the only solution for code-compliant vertical circulation in a house with such a small footprint. The alternative would have involved building a "saddlebag" onto the side of the house to create a traditional stair run, which would have exceeded the budget.
The floating oak staircase in the first-floor family room leads to the rooftop garden, which features a lounge area, grill, and small bar room with a restroom. Bespoke oak shelving behind the stair offers a display area for books and other objects.
The sunken living room created an opportunity for a bespoke joinery unit that can be used as a bench overlooking the courtyard as well as a storage space for books and objects. Topped with the same Iranian travertine marble that is used for the flooring in the entrance, it extends the hallway along the courtyard into the living room.
The bespoke sofa in the retreat features rich purple upholstery that contrasts with the more neutral white and timber finishes, creating an element of sophisticated drama.
The built-in timber storage units in the living room feature the same concrete top as the kitchen bench and the desk in the study nook. The rawness of the concrete contrasts with the refined oak timber joinery and minimal white walls.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
A coat of Dunn Edwards "Frosting Cream" brightens up the surroundings significantly.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
The project team excavated a portion of the backyard to create a sunken patio that seamlessly meets the grade of the interior living spaces. The interior flooring is large-scale honed basalt tile (24" x 48" in size), which becomes 24" x 48" flamed basalt tile at the exterior patio.
The original living room was converted into an open-plan kitchen and dining area with a living room that can be reconfigured into a bedroom. The use of natural materials and the large windows that flood the space with natural light and frame the views make the small space feel bright and airy.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
The two simple volumes are intersected by an internal courtyard that maintains visual transparency between the front and back of the home.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
The Stovax freestanding wood fire in the living room is used to heat the home. The concrete floor provides thermal mass, which helps maintain thermal stability.
Measuring 2,018 square feet, the single-family residence has been tenderly cared for since its completion, offering a unique chance to step back in time. With a ribbon of transom windows along its front side, the midcentury also has an expansive windows spanning across the back.
The open-plan living area features a hanging fireplace. The space wraps around a central core containing the new oak staircase, bathroom, and storage.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
The architects incorporated sustainably sourced parota wood into the living room’s sunken seating area. The Turn Tall side table is from Blu Dot, and the pillows are from West Elm.
The 1894 Queen Anne Victorian features an open floor plan that juxtaposes classic original features with cool modern elements—many of which are customized for the home.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
Full-height French doors lead from the den to the pool area.
The original brick wall is made of a sand-lime mix; in front of it sits a sofa by Robin Day for Habitat. In the study, a Louis De Poortere rug, from a collection inspired by the 1960s, evokes Farnley Hey’s early years. The Yorkstone flooring has been well varnished over time. The seating unit is by Robin Day and the side table is by Oliver Bonas.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
Subtle curves introduced throughout the design, such as in the built-in casework and stone plinth, soften the geometric plan of the home.
The den.
The "library under the stars" features thousands of old books plucked from antique shops.
Agora Fukuoka Hilltop Hotel & Spa in Fukuoka, Japan
The light-filled, open-plan living and entertaining spaces feature double-height ceilings and a variety of bespoke built-ins.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs, featuring accessible design that were decades ahead of his time, including a lack of thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house, including the built-in seating shown here.
The only new furniture items were a pair of couches that a were a gift from O’Reilly’s grandmother when they moved in.
A double-height graffiti wall is bathed in natural light.
The living and dining areas are located in one large, open-plan space—which is typical of Breuer homes.
A view of the large, open-plan living space.
The TV nook sits just off the living room. Built-in shelving flanks a cozy fireplace.
The energy-efficient Dickerman Residence by Richard Pedranti Architect boasts warm wood ceilings, midcentury-inspired furnishings, and a stately stone fireplace.
The Atrium Townhome by Robitaille Curtis has a 32-foot atrium with a skylight running the full width of the house. The third story features a net “floor” at the top of the atrium that turns the void into a dramatic play surface adjacent to the kid’s bedrooms. The use of a net in this location precludes the need for guardrails and opens the floor plan to unimpeded views to and from the third floor. Riggers from Cirque du Soleil provided and installed the trapeze net.
An additional sitting area is wrapped in warm wood.
Full-height windows provide the living room with lots of natural lighting. A generous fireplace anchors the room.
A full-height wall of glass brings additional natural light into the open-plan living area. The step down creates a cozy divide in the space.
The reception desk at Eaton Wellness.
A few steps lead up to the dining room area.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.