122 Living Room Pendant Lighting Table Design Photos And Ideas

The large pendant lamp was designed by Arik Levy for Vibia, and the TamTam floor lamp was designed by Fabien Dumas for Marset.
"Typical electricity bills should be between $15 to $25 per month," Impola states. With 10 windows evenly distributed along the walls, the interior space receives an abundance of natural light throughout the day.
Wraparound windows and sliding glass doors lead to the mahogany deck, giving the home a strong sense of indoor/outdoor living.
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
The owners asked for new common spaces with improved connectivity to the back garden and swimming pool.
The open-plan living room, kitchen, and dining area are handsomely punctuated with Lightyears Caravaggio pendant lights and the dramatic Moooi Random Lights.
The vaulted ceiling adds to the home's bright and airy character.
The floor in which the living and dining rooms are located on is made of reclaimed wood. The space takes on a midcentury vibe and has been furnished with pieces from Brazilian designers from the 1950s and 60s, such as Jorge Zalszupin and Sergio Rodrigues.
Solar panels provide enough energy to power lighting and electrical outlets.
"A minimalistic color spectrum was used in order not to distract from the main accent—the view from the window," adds the architects.
A cozy family room has been created off the kitchen, and includes a custom built-in breakfast nook and sofa.
"I wanted our home to have as many windows as possible," Jorie says. "I love how the plywood ceilings turned out looking so clean and natural."
The Baltic residence's shared spaces include a 24-hour gym and plenty of lounge areas.
The living room at the heart of the home has been designed using a panelized building system to reduce labor needs on the island.
The timeless character of the black concrete is felt as one enters the semi-hidden entrance path to the house, and each of the volumes gradually reveals itself.
This structure encloses the interior wall at an axis of 45 degrees on the plane.
A look at the dining table by Habitat and colorful IKEA dining chairs.
The residents furnished the interior themselves, even hand-picking the exposed reclaimed beams from a barn in Pennsylvania. The dining table and shelving unit are 1970s vintage and the sofa is from Design Within Reach (left). The height of the top level varies from around nine to 12 feet.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
On one end of the top-floor communal space is a white volume that neatly contains the kitchen, pantry, and toilet.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
The hotel is furnished with rattan furniture made in Sarchí, a Costa Rican town famous for crafts.
Climbing vines form a green wall and ceiling in the communal lounge area, providing some privacy without disturbing the natural setting.
A hanging rattan chair and Acapulco chairs add a breezy, laid-back vibe to the lounge.
Faulkner employed a strategic use of concrete, steel, wood, and glass to avoid “dating” the property.
A curved pink couch designed by Campagnola curves around a 1970s-style conversation pit in the living room.
The roundness of the house lends itself perfectly to an open, wallless floor plan.
A view from the second floor. Floor-to-ceiling windows keep the interiors bright and airy, while full height curtains provide protection from the heat of the sun.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.
For this 780-square-foot apartment Hong Kong apartment, local practice MNB Design Studio used plywood, smart storage solutions, and tapped into the principles of origami to create a highly structured, minimalist home.
Respecting the existing site, Suyama and his team left all of the trees in place. They also ensured the trees were fully protected during the excavation process.
The white surfaces are differentiated by their textures and together with the wood form the ideal neutral base for the delicate, yet vibrant color palette.
Polished concrete blocks and a concrete floor are contrasted by a birch plywood tray ceiling. Paola and Jason cut the vertical strips in the ceiling themselves and placed fabric behind to soften the acoustics. Custom brackets were added to the modular seating from West Elm, the table top and legs were found on Etsy, and the chandelier is by Avenue Lighting.
In the living area, a cedar storage unit made by Grant features a five-by-five-foot sliding panel that conceals shelving and the television. “It’s a way to make it feel less like a TV room during the day,” Beer says. The sunken sofa—a throwback to the residents’ childhoods in the 1970s— is from the Houdini collection by King Living. The dining chairs were a secondhand purchase.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
The tongue-and-groove ceiling is an authentic midcentury touch, while clerestory windows help keep the living area bright.
The open plan living area, complete with sealed concrete floors and ceilings lined with hoop pine, looks out on a 366-square-foot veranda and has views towards the natural estuary of Pittwater.
This serene one-bedroom apartment at the intersection of Friedrichshain and Kreuzberg is tastefully decorated in blue.
A node to the past, original doors have been re-purposed and now provide decorative paneling behind the reception desk.
The view from the southern facade.
The existing space's concrete floors and zinc windows were restored.
Cacao House in Green Village, Bali.
Flooring includes Teragren bamboo, cork in the kitchen, and porcelain at entry points. American Yellow Birch was used for the cabinets and trimming.

Photo by: Eric Hausman Photography
A neutral palette for furniture keeps the interior feeling light and sun-drenched.
When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.
A cabinetry wall  is constructed with marine plywood.
This box structure creates a second, lower ceiling above the living lounge.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.