81 Living Room Pendant Lighting Storage Design Photos And Ideas

An Eames lounge and a rug from HD Buttercup.
"They wanted a very practical house, with separate zones for kids and adults," said Taugbøl. "Because of the split levels, the experience of the space varies when you walk through it," and ascend the staircase. "The acoustics are also great due to the wood paneling in the ceiling." The Raimond pendent lights are from moooi, and the fireplace seating is IKEA.
Ample storage is provided in the kitchen area and the steps leading up to the bed.
The two yellow hanging pendants contrast with the light green and hint at the punches of yellow also found in the bathroom.
The view from the kitchen.
The renovation opened the kitchen to the living space and added an island for increased prep and storage space.
A large living space combines the best of all elements: exposed truss, steel framed windows, wood accents, simple pendant light,  and mod furnishings.
The settings for the Haiku Senseme fan by Big Ass Solutions can be adjusted via an app.
The main room is conceived as a series of revolving scenes, bracketed by cabinets and a wall of FilzFelt, layered in panels to dampen sound.
Graham Hill, a sustainability advocate whose TED talks have delved into the benefits of living small, put his own lessons into practice at his 350-square-foot apartment, which he shares with his partner and two dogs. Quick transitions, like drawing the FilzFelt curtain, convert the living space into a bedroom.
Walnut storage, both open and closed, frames a black-painted wall with a fireplace at its center. The wall treatment can also hide a future television. "A dark wall is a great way to keep a large screen from feeling like a big black hole on the wall," notes the firm.
Light from outdoors streams into one of the atmospheric interior spaces.
The living room flows into the kitchen.
A Cosmorelax Essex sofa sits in the living area, along with Maxalto Fulgens armchairs.
Wrapped in cypress wood inside and out, the home embodies the principles of organic architecture.
Primary colors and bold art dominate the home's decor. "The yellow and green Warhol flowers —that's my favorite Warhol. My last name means flowers in Italian. So I just l love flowers,
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.
A view of the dining area and living space from the kitchen. The floors are polished concrete while the walls are lined in baltic birch. The lighting is by Hamster.
The original fireplace and stucco ceilings were retained in the living lounge.
The space between the sleeping nook and balcony functions as a flexible living area.
The perforated structure enables ample light penetration, allowing the owners to look out to the street while still maintaining their privacy.
The dining table is the Bonaldo Tracks table, while the dining bench is from IKEA. The window seat provides additional seating.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
Wood floors and carpet provide a warm contrast to the cool concrete walls.
The open-plan living room connects to the kitchen and outdoors.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The view out to the garden.
In the wide hallway between the kitchen and additional bedrooms is an entertainment and leisure space.
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
In the living room, the horizontal lines of the timber beams at the ceiling echo the bespoke cabinetry that surrounds the gas fireplace. The dining room pendant is the Gubi Semi Pendant.
A highly efficient ductless mini-split system provides heating and cooling.
Solar panels provide enough energy to power lighting and electrical outlets.
Horner remembers his first visit to the home: "The architecture in the main living area was fantastic, and we just wanted to preserve that and concentrate on the areas of the home that were ill-considered."
This structure encloses the interior wall at an axis of 45 degrees on the plane.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.
A cabinetry wall  is constructed with marine plywood.
Bowie and Malboeuf’s unit occupies three levels facing the property’s backyard. The living-dining room has a mix of vintage pieces—a Wassily chair by Marcel Breuer and an LC4 chaise by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, and Charlotte Perriand—alongside furniture from CB2.
A handful of modernist classics—an Eames Lounge, a Bubble Lamp by George Nelson, and a shell armchair from Modernica—kit out the living room and kitchen.
The living area now feels open and bright and showcases the couple’s appreciation for furniture design and artwork. The family opted for a Camber sectional and rug from Design Within Reach, coffee table from Steven Alan Home, and replica Eames Lounge to outfit the space.
Built-in bunks are decked out with a private window for viewing the outdoors, and an adjustable reading light from Prima Lighting.  A simple pendant hangs above the main space.
“In an eighteen-foot-wide brownstone, there’s only so much you can do. But we wanted  it to feel fresh,” Keith Burns, architect and resident
Near a Gent wood-burning stove by Thorma in the living area, an IKEA Poäng chair and ottoman provide a cozy spot for reading. Thanks to the passive design strategies utilized by Ovchinnikov, the house stays warm through the winter with only minimal heating required.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
A linear lacquer storage unit with a Corian top helped define the main living areas; now the residents spend more time enjoying the apartment’s northern exposure–one of two main sources of natural light in the floor-through loft.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.