106 Living Room Pendant Lighting Shelves Design Photos And Ideas

Walnut storage, both open and closed, frames a black-painted wall with a fireplace at its center. The wall treatment can also hide a future television. "A dark wall is a great way to keep a large screen from feeling like a big black hole on the wall," notes the firm.
An L-shaped living, dining, and kitchen area overlook the backyard via full-height, triple-paned units from European Architectural Supply. "These high-performing European windows have substantial frames that are designed to not conduct cold and are also very well-sealed," the architects add. They used Schuco AWS75 Aluminium for the large first-floor units and Schuco SI82 uPVC for the smaller second-floor units. The striking drapery is from The Shade Store.
Light from outdoors streams into one of the atmospheric interior spaces.
Located in Portola Valley, California, this renovation of a William Wurster Ranch house began with a study of the home’s history. Inspired by original photos of the 1950s home, the renovation refreshed its significant architectural past without detracting from its Wurster essence.
A Cosmorelax Essex sofa sits in the living area, along with Maxalto Fulgens armchairs.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.
A living lounge with plenty of Victorian character.
A closer look at the den.
"Originally the living room was on the first floor, but we moved it to the second floor so that this area would enjoy more daylight and wind," says Sumiou Mizumoto, director of Alts Design Office.
The post-and-beam construction is highlighted by the use of white paint against the ceiling's natural wood finish, creating a chic, modern look.
The open-plan living room features expanses of glass, integrating the lush surroundings into the bright and airy space.
The space between the sleeping nook and balcony functions as a flexible living area.
The perforated structure enables ample light penetration, allowing the owners to look out to the street while still maintaining their privacy.
The dining table is the Bonaldo Tracks table, while the dining bench is from IKEA. The window seat provides additional seating.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
Here, you can see the spatial interplay of private and public rooms across the plan from the main bathroom through the pavilion to the landscaped setting beyond.
A great way to spend the day reading a book.
Overall living area with dual aspects and connections to an interstitial garden court and rear landscaped yard beyond its concrete terrace
Canny 'The New' Dining / Living
In the main living area are built-in platforms with storage spaces and niches that can be filled with padding to create sofas or beds.
"The triangular highlight frames views of the old Edwardian pressed metal roof and chimneys," the architects say of the triangular window to the left. "Like a traveler reflecting upon their hometown from abroad, we look back at the original part of the house, see its foibles and imperfections, and love it all the more for these eccentricities."
The open-plan interior has been sheathed in light-colored wood to create a sense of enclosure, as well as an escape from the modern world. The low-lying exterior decks have been designed to not require railings, ensuring the sightline to the surrounding wilderness goes unimpeded.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
The redesign of the staircase is a contemporary touch which could have just as easily existed in the home's original state. The wood slat screen blends with the wooden staircase and the wood ceiling opening the space and making it feel bigger—a huge improvement over the sheetrock wall that had been previously there.
Inside the studio, sliding fir screens hide storage, utilities, and a bathroom. The ceiling and wall panels are plywood, the floor is radiant heated concrete. An Eames lounge chair from Herman Miller mingles with an IKEA sofa.
In the living room, the team raised the firebox, cladded the hearth in a tactile plaster finish, and installed a floating limestone bench that wraps the column. On the left (unseen) is integrated firewood storage, and a cozy reading nook sits on the right. "The bench was designed to be used as a social space/lounge, and is well-used," says Coffey. The wood beams and red brick were scraped and stripped many times to remove the silver paint and reclaim a natural state.
This structure encloses the interior wall at an axis of 45 degrees on the plane.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
The roundness of the house lends itself perfectly to an open, wallless floor plan.
A view from the second floor. Floor-to-ceiling windows keep the interiors bright and airy, while full height curtains provide protection from the heat of the sun.
The modules’ steel beams are painted Folkstone 6005 by Sherwin-Williams, while the walls are Decorator’s White by Benjamin Moore. Vitsœ shelving by Dieter Rams holds books and curios.
For this 780-square-foot apartment Hong Kong apartment, local practice MNB Design Studio used plywood, smart storage solutions, and tapped into the principles of origami to create a highly structured, minimalist home.
Open shelves and sleek cupboards line one wall of the living room. The floor-to-ceiling glass door leads to the exterior courtyard, which is bounded by the perforated brick wall.
A planter is integrated under the open staircase leading to the upper floor, and a skylight in the roof illuminates the stairwell.
Typical of bungalows, the entrance leads straight into the living room.
The team kept the entryway intact, but opened the living and dining spaces up to the kitchen by removing a section of the wall at the deck door. They also inserted custom-crafted shelving to enclose the modern couch and create a cozy atmosphere.
The sitting room is an updated homage to the past that references the home’s history while keeping a distinctly contemporary vibe. "However, she did want to make one room that felt old," explains Yun.
The entire parlor floor now serves as an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area.
“With a single contribution of natural light -- the windowed facade facing street -- the apartment is designed to be 'turned' towards this light, with its glass rooms. Elements holding the old garage function were kept as witnesses and graphic structures of the apartment,” says Pelcé.
The concrete ceilings and beams from the original garage were retained.
The living room faces the rugged coastal.
Studio Batiik director Rebecca Benichou, explained that she was inspired by Moroccan style “even though no one noticed”.
Designed to adapt and expand with the changing needs and budget or its owner, Swallowtail’s structure, and floor plan allows for a flexible arrangement of furniture.
In the living area, a cedar storage unit made by Grant features a five-by-five-foot sliding panel that conceals shelving and the television. “It’s a way to make it feel less like a TV room during the day,” Beer says. The sunken sofa—a throwback to the residents’ childhoods in the 1970s— is from the Houdini collection by King Living. The dining chairs were a secondhand purchase.
A sectional designed by the residents joins a coffee table that Trey devised out of marble left over from a bathroom floor. The teak lounge chair by S.A. Andersen & Erik Andersen and Palle Pedersen for Horsnaes Møbler and the Jens Risom side table are both vintage. The painting is by Wesley Kimler.
Recessed built-ins made of Douglas fir were milled by TJM Custom Interiors.
Built-in storage compartments for firewood in the living room.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.