82 Living Room Pendant Lighting Medium Hardwood Floors End Tables Design Photos And Ideas

For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
"While we did include curtains in the initial sketches, the client proceeded without them," says Pons. "He does have neighbors nearby, but because the vegetation is so dense and lush, it not only provides shade and a cooling effect, but also acts as a natural barrier."
A modern farmhouse outside Tahoe National Forest stands as a vacation home and gallery for the owner’s art. Designed by architect Clare Walton, Martis Camp House consists of four gable forms divided by stone-clad volumes. Inside, the spaces are a collaboration between the owner, an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. A departure from the owner’s main residence that exudes a more traditional style, the summer and winter getaway is teeming with bespoke furniture, vintage finds, and personal art.
For this Eichler remodel, the objective was to respect the original bones with more thoughtful updates than what had come before. "Our goal was to design a beautiful mix of finishes that respected the timeless design intention of Eichler homes," say Sommer and Costello. "Rather than focus purely on historical renovation, we wanted to update the finishes and layout to ensure it lives on for the next generation."
The living room includes a Flexform couch and coffee table, along with Guscio chairs. A credenza and mirror from BBDW are one of the main focal points, while the homeowner added small accents from her many travels.
Sixteen-foot-long sliding doors open to a deck that feels more like a continuation of the living area than a distinctly outdoor space.
A loft takes advantage of the tall ceiling height in the main living space, whose unusual form is emphasized by wood ribs.
The most important aspect of designing this home was capturing the views from every angle. By placing the home on stilts, Herbst was able to make the best use of the surroundings.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Pine plywood complements the home's bright white walls and beams, while the heightened ceilings and multiple windows make the space feel larger than its 527 square feet.
The 1894 Queen Anne Victorian features an open floor plan that juxtaposes classic original features with cool modern elements—many of which are customized for the home.
"The idea of the building is to ‘hang’ it over the valley and open it to the valley by continuous windows," says the firm.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
A Juliette balcony with double French doors allows the ocean breezes to fill this stylish retreat, which has high, vaulted ceilings.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
"Rooms required thoughtfully scaled and placed pieces," say the designers. "Because of the numerous large windows in every room of the house, the color choices and textures were chosen with inspiration from outside."
An Erickson Aesthetics Lounge Chair sits with a mustard Swoon Chair from Space Copenhagen.
In the living room, a Croft House sofa cozies up to a Casamidy coffee table and leather-wrapped Remnant Stools from Cuffhome.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
The mansion has multiple spaces for entertaining, including this light-filled living room with bay windows.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
If they aren’t at the cocktail-fueled Evening Bar, chances are guests are hanging out in the “living room”—at least until the beer hall Brakeman and fried chicken joint Penny Red’s open.
A motley assortment of contemporary local and international art curated by the Detroit gallery Library Street Collective enlivens the hotel.
Awash in blue, the prominent "living room" is not just a social hangout for Shinola Hotel guests, but the downtown Detroit community.
An abundance of glazing pours light into the house. Hardwood floors are used throughout the home.
Light-toned parquet floors, a pastel palette, and Murano glass chandeliers contrast with steel structural elements in the living room-like lobby, which offers food and drink service.
The light-filled lobby, located in the basement, is at once industrial and warm.
Of the many architectural landmarks in Los Angeles, few are as iconic of Hollywood’s film industry as the Ennis House, which hit the market after a $17,000,000 renovation.
There are four viewing decks to take in the spectacular scenery and sunsets. The extensive glazing forms a seamless integration of indoor-outdoor space.
Liebermann and his wife Eva did the brickwork in the house—the most impressive section being the two arches that hover over the living areas and are surrounded by the home’s old-growth redwood structure.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
By the Saey fireplace, a wicker chair from Malawi echoes the lines of Pinch’s Willo table. Matching other pieces to their line “is not an exact science,” Oona says, “just an innate reaction to things we love.”
The Blue Dot sofa is from Restoration Hardware.
This bright suite features a furnished balcony.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
The view from the kitchen to the living area above and atelier below.
The dramatic, double-height great room is defined by its massive walls of glass that look out to the landscape.
The double-height living space is anchored by a wood-burning stove by Lopi in the corner. The large east-facing window on the far wall floods the room with magical morning light. All the windows and doors are by Quantum.
To give the interior a more open and spacious feel, the team exposed the ceiling beams.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls on both sides of the main living room allow sweeping views straight through the house.
The drama of the exterior is matched by a breathtaking interior, where soaring ceilings and large stained-glass windows bring ample natural light and connection to the landscape indoors.
Living room: with oak herringbone floor, custom made 5 meter long tv-bench made of birch plywood. Treated with natural soap and osmo wax. Dining table also made of same materials with doubled 18 mm plywood glued together and added brass details. By creating an open space plan, the living room looks more spacious with the natural light added. LED lighting on the transition of wall/ceiling and on the tv bench.
Floor-to-ceiling Lift/Slide doors by Weiland and clerestory glazing usher the outdoors in to the open-plan living and dining areas.
Though much of the interior was gutted, the west-wall fireplace was left intact due to the risk that removal could have had on the building's structural integrity.
Slatted wood folding doors divide the public and private areas to create visual separation without compromising the home’s inherent openness.
The walls are white-painted sheetrock and the floors are lined with local pine.
Black Richlite also wraps around the living area as an interior band above the wooden shelf.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The floor in which the living and dining rooms are located on is made of reclaimed wood. The space takes on a midcentury vibe and has been furnished with pieces from Brazilian designers from the 1950s and 60s, such as Jorge Zalszupin and Sergio Rodrigues.
A sheltered patio provides the perfect place to sip wine and take in the views.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.