212 Living Room Pendant Lighting Medium Hardwood Floors Chair Design Photos And Ideas

The interior is marked by an open plan that allows all of the rooms to connect to the verdant surrounding through the transparent northern facade.
For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The interior of the cabin is constructed out of salvaged Douglas fir.
Although it’s only 93 square feet, the first floor appears larger with its flared walls.
"While we did include curtains in the initial sketches, the client proceeded without them," says Pons. "He does have neighbors nearby, but because the vegetation is so dense and lush, it not only provides shade and a cooling effect, but also acts as a natural barrier."
The living room is the largest and brightest space of the home. A bisecting staircase leads to the bedroom, kitchen, and living/dining room. As per the client’s desire for privacy and discretion, the furnishings have been staged by Etel Design.
When designing her weekend getaway in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, architect Fernanda Canales knew the remote nature of the plateau and erratic weather conditions would prove tricky. In addition to withstanding the harsh climate, the house would need to also be self-sufficient. To embrace the beauty of the landscape while being open to sun exposure, the home wraps around four courtyards. Brick and concrete with high thermal mass create the foundation; its red hue and rough texture are juxtaposed against smooth concrete and wood inside. A unique facet to the home are the arches in the roofline—barrel-vaulted ceilings span the family room and all the bedrooms.
The first step was to tear out the existing wall-to-wall carpeting and replace it with cabin-grade, oak flooring to give the house a classic feel and to help anchor the more modern walls and trim. They ordered the flooring from a large company and despite it being the cheapest option offered, the total expense came to $2,300 for materials, making the wood floors—according to Anderson—their biggest splurge.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
A look inside the 1,800-square-foot, three-bedroom, 2.5-bath barnHouse with a soaring living room ceiling.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard.
Homeowners Luciano Bedoya and Liya Moya worked with interior designer Augusta Pastor on the furnishings. The Ghost sofa is by Paola Navone for Gervasoni, the Beni Ourain rug is from Mascarpone Originale, the About A Lounge 92 chair is by Hay, and the coffee table is by Primas.
A modern farmhouse outside Tahoe National Forest stands as a vacation home and gallery for the owner’s art. Designed by architect Clare Walton, Martis Camp House consists of four gable forms divided by stone-clad volumes. Inside, the spaces are a collaboration between the owner, an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. A departure from the owner’s main residence that exudes a more traditional style, the summer and winter getaway is teeming with bespoke furniture, vintage finds, and personal art.
Another view of the living space. A large sliding door spans the entire width of the room, while windows extend to fill the rest of the gable end.
For this Eichler remodel, the objective was to respect the original bones with more thoughtful updates than what had come before. "Our goal was to design a beautiful mix of finishes that respected the timeless design intention of Eichler homes," say Sommer and Costello. "Rather than focus purely on historical renovation, we wanted to update the finishes and layout to ensure it lives on for the next generation."
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
Liberation Tiny Home’s 24' x 8.5' entry-level home is called Rumspringa, and it starts at $45,000. The home is available with either a modern or traditional design aesthetic. From there, the models size up and can include optional features like soaking tubs, composting or incinerating toilets, and stairs with built-in storage.
A long, slender skylight illuminates the top-floor lounge area. "The home’s location on the eastern slope of the creek ensures prolonged sunlight throughout the year, while also being optimally exposed to the prevailing rising air currents in the valley," states the firm.
A look inside the post-and-beam screen porch built with locally sourced eastern white pine. The floors are Port Orford cedar.
Inspired by historic American farmhouses, a modern dwelling at the base of the Rocky Mountain Foothills in West Boulder, Colorado was designed by Boulder-based firm Surround Architecture. At the transition between the living room and kitchen, firewood is stored in a metal box that projects out from the wall, announcing itself with its contrasting color and slim profile.
A loft takes advantage of the tall ceiling height in the main living space, whose unusual form is emphasized by wood ribs.
One of the highlights of the home is the glass bi-fold doors, which emphasize the L.A. residents' embrace of indoor-outdoor living.
The open-plan living area in a restrained palette of neutrals.
The open floor plan features a whitewashed interior, beamed wood ceilings, splashes of hardwood, and a freestanding vintage fire drum fireplace sourced by Wilson’s wife Coco.
Thanks to passive cooling techniques such as natural ventilation, the House for Hermes does not need air conditioning in the summer.
The most important aspect of designing this home was capturing the views from every angle. By placing the home on stilts, Herbst was able to make the best use of the surroundings.
The master bedroom has chairs by Hay and a Wittus stove. The ceiling is a custom blue from Benjamin Moore. “It changes in response to what’s happening outside more than any other surface,” says Kathy.
Frances Bacon, the couple’s French bulldog, rests on the screened-in porch.
Kitchen, dining , and living room
The House in Kyoto illuminated with select lighting at night.
Since the house is edged in by homes on the east, west, and south sides, the architect punctuated the gabled roof with large skylights to bring daylight into the home.
In the living room, the original carpet was ripped up and replaced with hardwood flooring.
The upper floor of one of the cabins features a wood-burning stove, beanbag chairs, and a hanging paper lantern.
The existing wood structure and ceiling of the former saloon were completely refinished, and the exposed rafters were painted white for a brighter and more spacious feel. The old windows, floors, and finishes were replaced to create consistency with the new house.
 “It feels very much like a home, where we mixed products from our design partners together very organically, whether they be books, textiles, ceramics or furniture, so there is a sense of inspiration and discovery," says McKinley.
Living Room
Living Room
Living Room
A view of Sir Victor's entryway and lobby.
The largest beams in the home are made of cenizaro—a native tree that's larger than teak but has a similar grain.
Pine plywood complements the home's bright white walls and beams, while the heightened ceilings and multiple windows make the space feel larger than its 527 square feet.
The family loves books. This wall of bookshelves was custom-designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and fabricated by Tomlinson Woodworks. A bespoke reading nook is on the right.
The 1894 Queen Anne Victorian features an open floor plan that juxtaposes classic original features with cool modern elements—many of which are customized for the home.
The existing living room received modern built-in storage and blue paint that syncs with the addition.
The living room features a dramatic stone fireplace and vaulted tongue-and-groove ceilings.
The living room faces the canal. A wall of sliding glass doors open to a patio.
In Lorne, Victoria, Austin Maynard Architects gave an old shack near the beach a modern revamp and a timber extension that allows for elevated sea views. With interiors lined in recycled Silvertop Ash, the house oozes a cozy, cabin-like feel.
A warm, voluminous family room is located off the kitchen, overlooking beautiful ocean views.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.