128 Living Room Pendant Lighting Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Living Room
The nave contains the living and studio space. Taking full advantage of the height and scale of the original structure, the main area allows for adaptation over the lifetime of the building.
The main floor has an open living, dining, and kitchen area with unobstructed views since support beams were unnecessary for the domed structure. The floors are concrete with a decorative finish.
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
In the living room, the horizontal lines of the timber beams at the ceiling echo the bespoke cabinetry that surrounds the gas fireplace. The dining room pendant is the Gubi Semi Pendant.
The open-plan living room, kitchen, and dining area are handsomely punctuated with Lightyears Caravaggio pendant lights and the dramatic Moooi Random Lights.
A highly efficient ductless mini-split system provides heating and cooling.
"I drew from the layout of Jens Risom’s cabin and laid the room out around the light that comes in through the main windows," says Kenny.
Inside the studio, sliding fir screens hide storage, utilities, and a bathroom. The ceiling and wall panels are plywood, the floor is radiant heated concrete. An Eames lounge chair from Herman Miller mingles with an IKEA sofa.
The living area is small, however, the double-height ceiling give is a more vast sense of space.
Extensive glazing keeps the interiors bright and enhancing the homes' strong connection to its surroundings. <span style=
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
The timeless character of the black concrete is felt as one enters the semi-hidden entrance path to the house, and each of the volumes gradually reveals itself.
The sofa in the living room is also by IKEA.
A look at the dining table by Habitat and colorful IKEA dining chairs.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
 A study area on the mezzanine level overlooks the kitchen. Extensive glazing gives the ground floor living spaces a direct visual link with the courtyard and terrace.
The open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen are encompassed with bright vibes.
Throughout the design, the site was quickly revealed as a powerful element of the project. By choosing carefully the location and size of each window, external views were highlighted, and the atmosphere created by natural light is pleasant throughout the whole day. As for the position of the large sliding door, it was “ pushed “ toward the main interior open space with the intention of subtly separating the internal functions while creating a outside protected space. All these intentions ultimately aim to capture the essence of this project: the surrounding nature and wildlife.
Builder Ross Percival helped finesse the finely tuned detailing that separates the internal slope from the rock outside (opposite). The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
The concrete bench in the living area just past the kitchen is built into the sloping wall. The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
The hotel is furnished with rattan furniture made in Sarchí, a Costa Rican town famous for crafts.
Climbing vines form a green wall and ceiling in the communal lounge area, providing some privacy without disturbing the natural setting.
A hanging rattan chair and Acapulco chairs add a breezy, laid-back vibe to the lounge.
The ceiling throughout the main floor is exposed wood joists and plywood sheathing, all of which were painted white to provide texture and give more character to the room.
Arbel’s projects—both products and architectural commissions—follow a chronological numbering system. The house itself is his 23rd design, while the one-of-a-kind glass pendants that accent nearly every room like a starscape are called “28.”
Davor and August check out the yard from the living room. “The bifold Vistalite doors allow us to open the house up completely and enjoy the fresh, warm air,” Davor says.
Faulkner employed a strategic use of concrete, steel, wood, and glass to avoid “dating” the property.
A curved pink couch designed by Campagnola curves around a 1970s-style conversation pit in the living room.
The master bedroom is illuminated in part by one of two hatched windows that Tanaka modeled after those he had seen in Japanese tea houses.
The Shinomotos have filled their Southern California home with furniture by Taku and pieces by some of the artists and craftspeople whose work they also showcase at their Tortoise shops and showroom. The couple worked with architectural designer Ken Tanaka to remodel the house, once a cramped, two-bedroom rental. A sofa and tables by Taku join Jasper Morrison’s Three Sofa De Luxe sofa for Cappellini. The sliders are by Western Window Systems.
The starbust cedar wall was constructed by local carpenter Nathan Mcconnell.
Open shelves and sleek cupboards line one wall of the living room. The floor-to-ceiling glass door leads to the exterior courtyard, which is bounded by the perforated brick wall.
A planter is integrated under the open staircase leading to the upper floor, and a skylight in the roof illuminates the stairwell.
The living room.
The staircase is hidden between wood paneled walls adorned with white, wooden slats, allowing light to filter into the stairway.
A large living space combines the best of all elements: exposed truss, steel framed windows, wood accents, simple pendant light,  and mod furnishings.
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Polished concrete blocks and a concrete floor are contrasted by a birch plywood tray ceiling. Paola and Jason cut the vertical strips in the ceiling themselves and placed fabric behind to soften the acoustics. Custom brackets were added to the modular seating from West Elm, the table top and legs were found on Etsy, and the chandelier is by Avenue Lighting.
The burnished concrete floor contains ten-percent fly-ash and slag.
In the living area, a cedar storage unit made by Grant features a five-by-five-foot sliding panel that conceals shelving and the television. “It’s a way to make it feel less like a TV room during the day,” Beer says. The sunken sofa—a throwback to the residents’ childhoods in the 1970s— is from the Houdini collection by King Living. The dining chairs were a secondhand purchase.
The spacious open living/dining room has an original wood burning fireplace.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
The open plan living area, complete with sealed concrete floors and ceilings lined with hoop pine, looks out on a 366-square-foot veranda and has views towards the natural estuary of Pittwater.
Layered concrete walls and ceilings add a raw masculinity to the interiors.
Elegant, cream and white colored sofa and chairs, and wood details compliment the raw concrete fitouts beautifully.
The existing space's concrete floors and zinc windows were restored.
Vintage Beni Ourain rug and custom scaffold plank floor to ceiling shelving by alexander design and PSS Design Cult.
A corner that's used as a home gym.
A large modernist vacation home in Comporta, Portugal.
An Italian architecture studio offers an updated take on the vacation cabin. 
It's an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.