289 Living Room Pendant Lighting Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The home’s living room walls feature a mixed a custom color—a gallery white with a lime wash.
Perhaps the ultimate Airbnb, Le Chacuel in Yucca Valley is a minimalist retreat recently renovated by its design-minded owners.
The overlapping roofs rest on structural timber window frames, allowing for column-free views through the interior.
"Light is the most important part of a successful living space," Naughtin says. "We utilized double-height glazing with operable windows and large doors to maximize the intake of light and achieve a strong connection to the outdoor space." European oak storage in the living space matches that in the kitchen for a continuous flow.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
Custom pendant lights hang below the skylights in the roof.
A Loafer sofa and Lounge chairs by Space Copenhagen for &Tradition are arranged around a Kim table by Luca Nichetto for De La Espada. The side table is a Lato marble table by Luca Nichetto for &Tradition.
The living room features a sofa by Medley Home, a rug by Dash & Albert from Annie Selke, Akari Paper Lanterns by Noguchi, and an Aluminum Group Management chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller.
The airy, light-filled interior is made of reclaimed timber and siding from a 19th-century barn.
Triple-glazed windows and doors from Zola mitigate thermal gain.
Instead of designing a completely open plan, Berg separated the public rooms with a freestanding fireplace wall made of Mutual Materials bricks in Coal Creek. An Emmy sectional by Egg Collective for Design Within Reach faces a Lars chair from Room & Board
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
Fiona Shillington inside one of the A-framed cabins. Simple furnishings of built-ins line much of the living space inside while large windows and doors open onto a patio at one end.
Inside, workaday concrete floors contrast with the home's clean lines and soft touches.
Featured during Palm Springs’s Modernism Week, this funky pad embodies a rock-and-roll vibe with Mick Jagger memorabilia living alongside leopard prints, skulls, and pop-inspired colors. Up to six guests can enjoy this three-bedroom, two-bathroom home.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
Easy living was one of the homeowners' main goals, and thanks to the work of A. Gruppo, they now have a home they can be happy in for a long time to come.
"As far as our visitors go, most of them are really intrigued and impressed by the rotating television that separates the living area from the kitchen and allows us to watch wherever we are spending our time," says Lori. "This was one of those ideas that A. Gruppo just ran with and figured out after a brainstorming session one afternoon."
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
The soaring, timber-clad ceilings of the open-plan living, dining, and kitchen area follow the curve of the corrugated Zincalume roof, creating an impressive volume with views over the valley.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living room is vented through the warehouse’s sawtooth roof, sheathed in plywood above the living room.
"In architecture, we tend toward natural materials and raw metals. In furniture, we like color,
A porthole from the kitchen to the entrance—which makes reference to the seaside location—allows guests to be seen and welcomed as they arrive.
The rear facade has been divided into two, with a fully glazed wall that floods the living space with natural light.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
Built with redwood, glass, red brick, and concrete, the house was originally designed by John Lautner for the Schaffer family, who used to spend time enjoying picnics under the resident oak trees. Lautner built the house horizontally around the oaks.
Krofchick describes the look as "Cali chic" with an infusion of ’70s spirit.
The Loft Box is on the top floor of an ’80s walk-up apartment. The removal of false ceilings allowed Cheok to insert an attic that overlooks the living and dining spaces.
A large, open living room seamlessly flows from the kitchen.
Set on a family cattle farm in a Western Australia coastal town on the Margaret River, Bush House, by Archterra founder Paul O'Reilly, marries a single-plane roof with a prefabricated steel frame support structure. A rammed-earth wall carries through O'Reilly's house into the outdoors, melding with oiled plywood, anodized aluminum, and recycled furniture.
designed by Estúdio Minke
An Italian architecture studio took advantage of an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood. While its exterior offers a smoother, stuccoed appearance, its interiors give way to a juxtaposition of two different concrete applications, opting for a rougher, board-formed treatment on the walls and a quartz paste polish on the floors. Wood accents, by way of the trimwork, doors, and cabinetry, provide rich, striking counterpoints.
When a couple approached Colorado-based Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects for a modern mountain retreat, they brought with them images of what would be the founding inspiration behind the new design—a simple and rugged cabin in Norway where the husband and his relatives had been gathering since the 1950s. Much like this ancestral Norwegian cabin, the new getaway is designed with the same rustic charms and deference to the landscape, as well as an inviting environment for friends and family to gather for generations to come.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
A 200-square-foot loft above the storage room overlooks the workspace.
On the recommendation of a close friend, the couple flew to Texas to meet the team behind the award-winning architecture firm Lake|Flato, whose Porch House program seemed to offer the perfection solution to the family’s quick-build needs.
About an hour’s drive from New York City, the Stuart Richardson House is a Usonian treasure with a hexagonal motif. As with most of Wright’s Usonian designs, there are floor-to-ceiling windows to allow for natural light. The living room’s 14 French doors open to a patio for indoor/outdoor living.
The built-in sectional in the living space features extra storage underneath to maximize every inch of the home’s small footprint.
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
The loft's original open floor plan, 13-foot-tall ceilings, and polished concrete floors remain. A modern, streamlined kitchen is now a central focal point.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
A board-formed concrete fireplace anchors the living room with a framed view of the lake.
The ceramic pendant above this cozy corner bench is by local studio Notary Ceramics; the wood table is by Vince Skelly.
The main living area is open and fluid. The polished concrete floors have radiant heating.
The kitchen, living room, and dining room are combined in a single, airy, great room.
The great room features a sound-dampening ceiling made of strips of Douglas fir laid over recycled denim insulation.
Natural light is filtered through the perforated, corrugated metal patio shade, creating changing patterns on the exposed aggregate concrete floors in the morning
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
The living room, located just steps away from the kitchen, offers ample seating. The leather couch, wood furniture, and polished concrete floors allow for easy cleaning.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.