102 Living Room Floor Lighting Recessed Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
New cork floors replaced the original carpet in the second unit.
The Great Room is stylishly fitted out with a Holly Hunt coffee table, Stefan Heiliger "De Sede" chairs, Thayer Coggin Lloyd sofas, a Robert James Nantucket Occasional Table, and sconces by Lianne Gold for Ralph Pucci.
Recessed lighting keeps the interiors elegant and bright.
The residence mitigates the slope with split-level organization. The living room and media room (pictured here) are located a few steps down from the kitchen and dining area on the ground floor.
A non-load bearing window wall—a characteristic feature of Usonian houses—dominates the living room.
The neutral color palette was carried over to the interior design, a collaborative effort between Connie Wone, the senior interior designer at Swatt Miers Architects, and Elisa Chambers of Snake River Interiors.
A view of the living area from the kitchen. The luxury gas fireplace is from Ortal.
The screen helps to better ventilate the interiors. Shifting shadows cast patterns on the walls of the house as the western sun streams through the corridor.
Iron louvers have been used along the western facade to create a narrow corridor between the screen and exterior walls of the main volume.
 A central staircase with perforated metal treads and risers allows natural light to filter down from the roof-deck level through the center of the home.
Angled balconies at the first and second levels are accessed by floor-to-ceiling sliding doors, enhancing the indoor/outdoor living experience and allowing natural ventilation.
Living Room
Faced with a giant wall of glass, the new concrete extension houses an open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen.
The bright and airy interiors are a mix of lightly colored oak floors juxtaposed again dark fixtures and exposed steel beams.
SysHaus completed their first project—a 2,217-square-foot, single-story home in  São Paulo—in collaboration with local architecture studio Arthur Casas Design, who was responsible for the furniture selection, utility systems, finishes, and interior accessories.
The houses are equipped with rainwater capture and reuse mechanisms, and photovoltaic panels for solar energy.
An off-center skylight brings natural light into the living room, where the existing fireplace (inset) was refinished in metallic paint. A fiberglass Koishi pouf by Naoto Fukasawa for Linea sits by an Eames sofa. The painting is by Vanessa Prager.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The kitchen and living area are connected to a small sun-drenched balcony.
A pink Wassily chair reworked by Anne Suttles, Noah Marion, and Austin Powder Coating.
A sofa from Conran Shop, and a vintage boucherouite rug from Pink Rug Co.
In the main living space, brightly colored furnishings—including an iconic womb chair and a sofa from Ligne Roset—create a playful interior space for lounging. A laminated glass floor allows light to pass further between the various levels.
The concrete bearing walls are left exposed in the interior to tie the living spaces with the rock outcroppings.
The repurposed divider slides into place and helps trap heat generated from the wood-burning fireplace.
The timber doors of a former garage have been repurposed into a room partition that separates the main living area from the rest of the ground floor.
In the living area, Lou sits on a Room & Board sofa, while one of the family’s two Great Danes relaxes nearby; the fireplace is by Montigo.
Wraparound windows and sliding glass doors lead to the mahogany deck, giving the home a strong sense of indoor/outdoor living.
A minimalist staircase links the living room to the upper level.
This view shows the space from another angle. The door at the bottom of the staircase leads to the laundry area. The door to the right of the staircase goes to a modern wine cellar with a sleek mounted wine rack from Stact.
"I prefer to think of it as a lower level because it no longer has the feel of a basement," explains Silver. A large picture window lets in lots of natural light and frames an atrium filled with succulents.
The opening to the dining area has been increased, and the square footage added to the original footprint has allowed for a grand staircase that now connects the lower level.
An alternate view of the living room.
Here is a peek at the living room looking toward the entry.
For the common areas, they choose more masculine, and contemporary design elements, and a darker color scheme to express the style preferences of the husband.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
The minimalist material palette is picked up on the interiors as well, where a black concrete fireplace plays off the polished aggregate concrete floors.
The living room opens to the courtyard.
Rotating artwork—all made by various female artists—is displayed on the walls.
Neutral, earthy tones and a mix of materials give the living room a warm and cozy vibe.
A long sofa in the center faces a coffee table topped with a slab of elm that was designed by Moss.
The open plan great room is bright and airy thanks to the insertion of the center courtyard .
The transformation is unrecognizable.
In the living quarters of Lightroom 2.0, Carpenter’s daughter Esme chats with her boyfriend, who is seated on a Milo Baughman Case Sofa.
This house is one of the five homes that are part of the Auhaus Release. Only 10 of each design will be built.
Since the owner wanted as much of an open concept as possible, Revollo used a small but impactful detail to designate each space: color. The kitchen is defined by black, the living areas by gray, and the outdoor space by honey.
Living Area
The living-dining area is outfitted with a Karlstad sofa from Ikea and a fireplace from European Home.
The home is a series of open and enclosed spaces with ample glazing to provide plenty of natural light.
An alternate view of the living space and wood-paneled fireplace.
Uninterrupted walls of glass in the living area offer views of the Indian Canyons Golf Course, the Disney fountain, and the picturesque mountain range.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.