218 Living Room Ceiling Lighting Lamps Design Photos And Ideas

The fireplace was painted white and now has a wood stove installed (not shown). "Once we got the wood stove, the room just came to life and became super cozy," says Jocie.
Main living space
Artist Christopher Florentino created this studio to be a source of inspiration. "This space is for me as an artist—to create in, to keep me inspired," he says. "I don’t think there are many spaces that have a Keith Haring and Shiro Kuramata chair in the same space. I’m trying to show who I am as a designer and as an artist."
Artist Christopher Florentino’s Ghost Loft is a delightful mix of midcentury treasures, Pop art, and Japanese design.
Floor-to-ceiling glass doors that stretch 27 feet long connect the interior to the side patio.
The living and dining room look out to the central courtyard, promoting indoor/outdoor living. Here, five doors slide into a pocket in the wall to create a nearly 23-foot-wide opening on one side looking into the garden. Another set on the opposite side enhances cross ventilation.
Crawford taught himself how to reface the brick fireplace façade, using a creamy-colored, thin set brick. “It was his first time using a tile saw or laying brick, but his meticulous precision paid off,” says Devlin.
The wood slat wall was a great solution for spreading light throughout the split-level and looks right for the era of the house. At $2700, it was also much more cost effective than Devlin’s original design of a metal staircase.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The rumpus room on the lowest level opens out to the pool deck and features a Boyd floor lamp from Australian brand Jardan, and a Nebula Nine sofa by Diesel Creative Team for Moroso.
An aqua Malm fireplace warms up a corner. The pink, green, and yellow stripes now reach the skylights and extend over an integrated storage space to the floor. “My husband and I, we both actually hate having a TV visible to guests, but it’s a necessary evil,” says Shawn. “So how do you make that interesting and without it being too busy? [The rainbow stripe] creates an element that draws your eye away.”
A relaxed living room with outdoor access occupies the addition.
Den
Richard Neutra was a pioneer in opening up living spaces so that they could serve as communal gathering spots.
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
The linear quality of the wood slat divider echoes the cedar planks on the home's facade, and contrasts with the curves of the couple's Estudio Persona side chair.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
Following shabby patch jobs and more than a century of neglect, a cottage is renovated with an abundance of South African pine.
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
With a neutral backdrop, the focus in the living room can be on the art: Higgins sourced these from artists Caroline Walls and David Cook.
This silk-and-wool rug was custom-designed by Gideon Mendelson for this Westchester home. The design was executed by Sprung & Rich.
A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
Designer Cortney Bishop used antique Serapi rugs—a type of Persian carpet—that she sourced from a local dealer to guide the design of this residence in Knoxville, Tennessee.
The private family sitting room on the first floor overlooks the atrium above the dining space through a colored glass screen that matches the one on the ground floor. Bamboo screens provide a “buffer” against harsh sunlight.
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
Zachary designed a new cabinet in walnut to anchor the room. The wood tones are a warm counterpoint to the butter-yellow sofa. The coffee table belonged to the owners.
The Curved Back sofa is from Lawson-Fenning. “It’s the most comfortable sofa,” says Zachary. “I have one, too.”
Chen designed circular copper bases for the Bluestone to create a coffee table with gravitas. The light is the Artemide Aggregato ceiling light with a counterweight.
In the living room, a 15-foot custom sofa with an integrated tea station sits across from a console table built from a log that was over 18 feet long.
Timber has been used for both internal and external cladding, joinery, furniture, and door handles throughout the home. The entry nook features built-in display storage with brass detailing, which is echoed in the kitchen counter.
Skylights throw pink and yellow tones across the 850-square-foot unit’s stepped ceilings. “With small spaces, we try to play with clerestory windows, skylights, and ceilings. It makes the architecture feel spacious, almost as though it’s levitating.”
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
The view from the kitchen is layered, first glimpsing a partial view of the dining room and the stained glass at the front exterior in the distance.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
Cuddington had the drywall removed to reveal the house’s original structural framework, which in turn screens the living areas while also allowing visual connection with the front door. "Having the ability to just swap out [the drywall] and open it up gave the home a sense of arrival and a preface to the type of materials that were being used in the project," says Cuddington.
The team removed the dropped ceiling and attic above to expose the tongue-and-groove paneling and the supports at the roof. A Swan Chair by Fritz Hansen sits with the client’s sofa and USM media cabinet.
“We were keen to approach this project with a minimal aesthetic to amplify the brutalist architecture of the Barbican Estate,” explains the firm.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
When Thomas and McCoy of Thomboy Properties came across the once-neglected home, they immediately recognized its potential and made an offer within 30 minutes of viewing. Paying careful attention to historical details, the design duo reimagined the space for modern living.
The second floor is where all three generations come together to eat, play, work, and gather around the fireplace.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
A coat of Dunn Edwards "Frosting Cream" brightens up the surroundings significantly.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.