148 Living Room Ceiling Lighting Bookcase Design Photos And Ideas

The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
London–based Steyn Studio designed a three-bedroom home on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain, that stands out from its neighbors with a striking sawtooth roof. The project, nicknamed the Sierra House for both its peaked profile and its location in one of Madrid’s northwestern neighborhoods between Mirasierra and Montecarmelo, features furniture and window treatments that complement the neutral tones of the exterior and interior materials. Textured walls of board-formed concrete provide visual interest in the living room.
The curvy shape of this pink sofa gives it a fun, playful quality.
The structural slab on the ground floor has simply been polished as a cost effective, practical, and durable flooring solution, especially to the sand and salt.
A bespoke timber joinery unit serves as a semi-partition between the kitchen and the living space, giving a sense of separation without disconnection. Dramatic patterns of light and shadow from the sculptural skylight play over the space.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
The four-bed, four-bath home of Peter and Sarah Diamond and their two adult children is uniquely situated in one of the most remote areas of the Berkshires: Mount Washington, Massachusetts.
The ground floor features Douglas fir flooring. The living room at the front of the house is separated from the entrance hallway by a black steel-framed glazed partition.
The bright pink and leopard print furnishings are reminiscent of Betsey's clothing line.
The sliding doors on both sides allow the house to be entirely open to tropical breezes. Floor-to-ceiling glass also offers expansive views of the landscape and beyond.
Another view of the living room and the sliding glass doors that open to the porch. In total, the home features 100 feet of glass spanning the full with of the front and rear facades.
A bookcase was built along the 30-foot long anchor wall in the large living space. The shelves are inset several inches away from the glass walls on either side, intended to create a floating effect that mirrors the way the house itself floats above the ground.
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
Stairs to basement, concealed by a curated art collection.
Front entry and living area.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Orcas Island Retreat by DeForest Architects offers a sustainable, soulful getaway for a young couple. This spacious reading nook is tucked away from the living spaces.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs to create an accessible design that was decades ahead of his time, including thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house.
"The wood structure has a depth that creates a play of shadows through the day and a calm atmosphere resembling the feeling of sitting under a tree," says the firm.
Short staircases lead to sequestered nooks made for contemplation and getting work done. "The concrete floors and stairs dissolve the division of inside and outside," says Atelier Oslo. "The interior becomes part of the landscape, and walking in and around the cabin gives a unique experience, where the different qualities from the site become part of the architecture."
Double-height, steel-framed glass doors connect the entire home to its beachfront setting.
Rockwell Group designed a flexible second-floor lobby with a co-working space and meeting rooms with transformable furniture, allowing them to double as lounges. “In a typical hotel, you can’t use a meeting room or other daytime spaces at night, and nightclubs sit empty during the day,” says Mitchell Hochberg, president of Lightstone Group. “We don’t have the option of doing that here.” Images of classical sculptures, warped by digital glitches, are in keeping with the tongue-in-cheek mood; miniature sculptures on the shelves cheekily take selfies or don leopard-print Speedos.
The first floor is a continuous public space featuring a dining area, kitchen, and living room.
To maximize functionality in the original two-story home, Office of Architecture treated the residence to a complete gut renovation, which allowed for the new four-level layout.
In the sitting area next to the bedroom wing, the exterior panels take the form of interior bookshelves. Framed with glass above, below, and between, the shelves allow nature to peek through.
The curved Jardan Valley sofa in green brings geometric interest to the living room.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
A shelving system in the living room displays books, decor, and the couple’s vinyl collection.
Living Room 02
Living Room 01
A sunroom provides additional living space.
The bold form of the roofline and the geometric windows were balanced with a streamlined approach to the interior, which is composed of light-washed oak floors and white-painted boards at the ceiling.
The lower level serves as a dining area or workspace, while a loft provides a cozy sleeping nook.
The architects widened the opening between the living room and dining room, then delineated it with brass accents. "Rather than try to match the existing historical moldings, we opted for minimal trim with brass inlays and a broad brass threshold marking the new opening," they said. The pendent lights are by Andrew Neyer.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
The living room is chic and polished, but still exudes a masculine vibe.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
“I loved the challenge of planning a fully functional home on a 32 ft x 8.5 ft trailer. I knew I wanted to include all of the basic living spaces that you would find in a conventional home: kitchen, living room, bathroom, two enclosed bedrooms, a laundry area, and storage spaces,” explains Kell.
The common area in this penthouse by Studio RHE boasts a digital cube ceiling, stunning views, and an immense book collection by the bar.
The Atrium Townhome by Robitaille Curtis has a 32-foot atrium with a skylight running the full width of the house. The third story features a net “floor” at the top of the atrium that turns the void into a dramatic play surface adjacent to the kid’s bedrooms. The use of a net in this location precludes the need for guardrails and opens the floor plan to unimpeded views to and from the third floor. Riggers from Cirque du Soleil provided and installed the trapeze net.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
A full-height wall of glass brings additional natural light into the open-plan living area. The step down creates a cozy divide in the space.
A pullout desk is hidden underneath one of the shelves.
A few steps lead up to the dining room area.
The elegant space is anchored by a brick, wood-burning fireplace.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.