89 Living Room Table Sectional Design Photos And Ideas

Jane Austen's restored family home in Bath, England, is now a rental on Airbnb. Sunlight from a central courtyard pours into the living area, which features a cosy seating area and several nooks for writing or reading.
The combined living, dining, and kitchen areas take up the main floor. "The goal for the design was to feel [as though you are] outside," says Dignard. Large, sliding glass doors capture the view and lead to an exterior deck.
Like much of the Italian Riviera, La Spezia on the Ligurian coast has a long maritime history. It was precisely this seafaring legacy that inspired the design of this tiny home, a 377-square-feet apartment that was reconfigured to clearly separate the living and sleeping areas. A cabinetry wall is constructed with marine plywood.
The home’s interior is a colorful homage to ’60s and ’70s California surf shacks.
When designing her weekend getaway in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, architect Fernanda Canales knew the remote nature of the plateau and erratic weather conditions would prove tricky. In addition to withstanding the harsh climate, the house would need to also be self-sufficient. To embrace the beauty of the landscape while being open to sun exposure, the home wraps around four courtyards. Brick and concrete with high thermal mass create the foundation; its red hue and rough texture are juxtaposed against smooth concrete and wood inside. A unique facet to the home are the arches in the roofline—barrel-vaulted ceilings span the family room and all the bedrooms.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
Brooklyn-born painter Christopher Florentino sought a residence to house his collection of midcentury modern furniture that he’d started to amass as a teen. When he saw a Gene Leedy–designed 1963 ranch house on Instagram, he knew he’d found the perfect place. Nestled in Winter Haven, Florida, the Ellison Residence was teeming with all the elements of Florentino’s modern design fantasy including courtyards, local sandstone, glass walls, and a sense of indoor/outdoor living. He bought the house without even stepping inside. Now, it’s filled with the quintessential accents of the era including a George Nelson’s Saucer Bubble pendant, Eames furnishings including a LCW chair, Molded Fiberglass armchair, and Molded Plywood coffee table. He also maintained all original facets of the home from cabinets to door hardware down to the cork flooring; and even the palette plays to the era with primary colors and color blocking dominating the abode.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
Architectural elements like coffered ceilings and columns were added to the dining room to give the space the charm and character that is usually associated with older homes.
The home's main living space consists of a classic open floor plan, with beautiful exposed-beam ceilings.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
Leading to a lush wall of green, the long reflecting pool on the ground floor divides the space, with the living area on the left and the dining area on the right.
Guests will also be treated to an acoustic concert in Napoleon III’s luxurious chambers before tucking into bed.
Living, dining, and kitchen spaces flow into one another in the soaring great room. Here, the Sacramento firm placed new, polished concrete slabs over the original ones to alleviate unsightly cracks.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
Berk melds inky tones with organic elements for a modern yet warm aesthetic.
Large windows with automatic shades incorporate smart home technology, balancing daylight with comfort.
An open-plan living/dining/kitchen area takes full advantage of the ample light from multiple floor-to-ceiling windows.
The home's large windows offer expansive views of downtown Los Angeles.
The energy-efficient Dickerman Residence by Richard Pedranti Architect boasts warm wood ceilings, midcentury-inspired furnishings, and a stately stone fireplace.
Kimpton Rowan Palm Springs Hotel in Palm Springs, California
All built-in furnishings were designed by the architects. The height-adjustable tables are from Billiani.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
“Although the LDK (living room, dining room, kitchen) faces east, it is bathed in light reflected off the hill in the afternoon,” say the architects. “With the absence of beams and sealing strips, the rafter seems to protrude from the white structural wall, making the LDK seem like a semi-outdoor veranda. The living room has become part of the garden, where you can naturally engage with the children playing or sprawling on the slope of the hill.”
When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.
A perfect example of a clean-lined Scandinavian home, Jurmo has an efficient floor plan with large windows and terraces that promote an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
The dining table and chairs were designed by Tim Sharpe.
An L-shaped living, dining, and kitchen area overlook the backyard via full-height, triple-paned units from European Architectural Supply. "These high-performing European windows have substantial frames that are designed to not conduct cold and are also very well-sealed," the architects add. They used Schuco AWS75 Aluminium for the large first-floor units and Schuco SI82 uPVC for the smaller second-floor units. The striking drapery is from The Shade Store.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
Vertical strips of white-painted populus paneling clads the exterior wall of the second-floor bedroom, creating a house-within-a-house effect. The sofa is by EBD and the chairs by APPAREILarchitecture.
The roofs of both wings converge at the garden to create a continuous porch around the house.
The great room features an open floor plan, as well as a vaulted tongue-and-groove ceiling.
The blue cabinets of the kitchen run through into the living area with a softer natural oak top tying the room together. A modular sofa can be moved in different configurations.
A white beamed ceiling adds structure to the open and airy living space bookended by immersive views of nature.
Modern Danish design has informed the minimalist interior, which is dressed in cozy fabrics and a muted natural palette.
An overview of the open-plan interior space.
The two pavilions are fitted with large sliding glass doors, which open to two wooden decks. Here, views are oriented toward the peaceful natural landscape and sea beyond.
The open-plan living room and dining area feature a cementitious floor covering, ERCO recessed LEDs, and EDL cabinetry laminates.
The open-plan living room, kitchen, and dining area are handsomely punctuated with Lightyears Caravaggio pendant lights and the dramatic Moooi Random Lights.
Across from the sofa, a concrete fireplace surround is topped with a custom walnut wall treatment.
The residents furnished the interior themselves, even hand-picking the exposed reclaimed beams from a barn in Pennsylvania. The dining table and shelving unit are 1970s vintage and the sofa is from Design Within Reach (left). The height of the top level varies from around nine to 12 feet.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
The minimalist material palette is picked up on the interiors as well, where a black concrete fireplace plays off the polished aggregate concrete floors.
Raw plywood contrasts with dark plaster in the 460-square-foot main cabin, whose communal space encompasses an efficient living/dining area and kitchen.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
With bright, spacious, interiors, the home is a testament to the visionary creativity of one of America’s most renowned modernist architects.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
The tongue-and-groove ceiling is an authentic midcentury touch, while clerestory windows help keep the living area bright.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.