108 Living Room Table Lamps Design Photos And Ideas

One of two Shiro Kuramata Ghost Lamps light up this scintillating living room featuring a storage unit by Eames, a Herman Miller clock, and a Kuramata-inspired florescent light fixture. An orange Womb Chair by Eero Saarinen and a Kazuhide Takahama Suzanne sofa surround an Eames "surfboard table."
Rose-tinted windows help soften the outside world while Creme Cork flooring absorbs and reflects the warmth of the strong Florida sun streaming in.
Artist Christopher Florentino created this studio to be a source of inspiration. "This space is for me as an artist—to create in, to keep me inspired," he says. "I don’t think there are many spaces that have a Keith Haring and Shiro Kuramata chair in the same space. I’m trying to show who I am as a designer and as an artist."
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Much of the furniture in the public spaces is vintage, sourced from local shops and collectors.
This silk-and-wool rug was custom-designed by Gideon Mendelson for this Westchester home. The design was executed by Sprung & Rich.
A double living room, a kitchen and a master suite (bedroom/bathroom), and two children's bedrooms with their bathroom and playroom were created in this 100 m2 space.
Skylights throw pink and yellow tones across the 850-square-foot unit’s stepped ceilings. “With small spaces, we try to play with clerestory windows, skylights, and ceilings. It makes the architecture feel spacious, almost as though it’s levitating.”
“We had a child and made a commitment to take care of my mother. We had to figure out a solution for housing us all with the right privacy and comfort,” says Ilga Paskovskis, owner of the Granny Pad.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
The chair and the fireplace in the living area are vintage, and the dresser is from Target.
After: The industrial accents were kept at the ceiling in a nod to its past. The city required interior insulation to fulfill code, which meant McCuen was unable to expose the more rough, industrial texture on the walls.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
A hanging fireplace from Fireorb anchors the living area, where Book Totem and Peace Sign, both by Karen, are on display. A Graffiti pendant by Hubbardton Forge hangs over a custom table by Jed Dawson.
Living space
The space after renovations, with cantilevering cabinetry along the perimeter to preserve and protect Hall's original radiant heating vents in the windowsills—an example of his innovative solutions for meeting the space's functional needs.
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
The open-plan dining and living areas, awash in natural light.
A mezzanine loft level provides extra floor space without increasing the home's footprint. Built-in bookshelves double as a guardrail for the lofted work space, accessed by a built-in ladder.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
The entirety of the Parker Palm Springs—including its retro lobby—was conceived by none other than legendary designer Jonathan Adler himself.
Pictured is the largest of the units, the "not-so-tiny home." Its two bedrooms anchor each end of the home, offering privacy. The homes feature 9-foot ceilings, and this unit can accommodate a king-sized bed.
Living, dining, and kitchen spaces flow into one another in the soaring great room. Here, the Sacramento firm placed new, polished concrete slabs over the original ones to alleviate unsightly cracks.
Berk melds inky tones with organic elements for a modern yet warm aesthetic.
A variety of carefully placed windows fill the living/dining/kitchen unit with light while maintaining a sense of privacy.
The home's asymmetrical gabled roof defines the ceiling heights of the interior spaces.
Finding a wheelchair accessible home in New York City can be a challenge, but after a diving accident left David Carmel paralyzed from the waist down, Carmel knew he was looking for a home that was "accessible but not institutional." Working with Della Valle Bernheimer, they made an apartment that is both beautiful and accessible, with a lightweight sliding wall that closes off the bedroom from the living area.
Alchemy Builders installed the roof and windows using traditional materials and building methods.
Warm wood finishes up the snug factor.
The energy-efficient Dickerman Residence by Richard Pedranti Architect boasts warm wood ceilings, midcentury-inspired furnishings, and a stately stone fireplace.
cozy by the fire
A Zuo Tanner floor lamp in matte black over a Verona Home Promesa Danish wood accent table melds the dining space with the living area.
The corner living/dining room offers both north and east exposures with Central Park and city views.
The To Be One and Lean On Me floor lamps in the lounge area are by OKHA.
The light-filled lobby, located in the basement, is at once industrial and warm.
Rows of globe lights featured throughout the rooms cast light in all directions—including up at the ceiling.
The design consists of pieces with a masculine edge in neutral tones, with focused pops of color inspired by views out the windows of nearby buildings.
Ranging in scale from 300–600 square feet, the living spaces provide all the necessities of a contemporary urban dwelling.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
Located in Portola Valley, California, this renovation of a William Wurster Ranch house began with a study of the home’s history. Inspired by original photos of the 1950s home, the renovation refreshed its significant architectural past without detracting from its Wurster essence.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
White resin was used for the flooring in the living room.
The roofs of both wings converge at the garden to create a continuous porch around the house.
Large windows surround the home to frame spectacular views of the outdoors and also bathe the interiors with natural light.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.