180 Living Room Table Medium Hardwood Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
A view from the kitchen out toward the living area provides a sense of the lofted interior.
Double-height ceilings mark the living area, where large windows harness plenty of natural light.
The large staircase features integrated storage and accesses the mezzanine, where the designers arranged the sleeping area.
The top living floor was completely renovated with huge windows that flood the interior with sunlight, and timber beams that span the entire width of the house.
Looking back from the children's play area to the living room, which features a bright red credenza from IKEA and other orange accent pieces.
Much of the furniture in the public spaces is vintage, sourced from local shops and collectors.
Canadian Castaway features a simple and rustic aesthetic with a focus on raw materials. "I didn’t want to paint the wood white, for instance," the owner says. "I just wanted to let it age naturally and invite it to mirror the natural world it's now a part of."
With a record playing in the background, gaze at bluestone boulders from the couch, then revive with a coffee made in the marble counter-topped galley kitchen at this post and beam saltbox cabin in Bearsville. It embraces an open-plan, loft-living layout, but contemplative moments abound—at the writing nook, on the glassed-in porch or sprawling deck, and in the beds enveloped by canvas "walls." Reward visits to Cooper Lake and the Mink Hollow hiking trail with a snooze on the central hammock, a Noguchi light fixture above.
Beyond its sliding doors, this storybook barn in Gallatin is airy and filled with natural light, courtesy of old, quirky window sashes. Original wood from the vast, open structure—privacy awaits in the reading nook—has been re-imagined and bolstered by throw rugs and glamorous chandeliers. With views onto the pastoral meadow, alfresco grilling feasts around the deck’s hand-made black locust table are bound to become a nightly occurrence.
The haussmanien style was refined and pared down in order to introduce minimal lines better suited to the contemporary usage of this living space now occupied by a modern family.

The street art collection of the property owners (Banksy, Jon One, Space Invaders, Obey...) counterbalances the classic spaces of the double living room.
A double living room, a kitchen and a master suite (bedroom/bathroom), and two children's bedrooms with their bathroom and playroom were created in this 100 m2 space.
Skylights throw pink and yellow tones across the 850-square-foot unit’s stepped ceilings. “With small spaces, we try to play with clerestory windows, skylights, and ceilings. It makes the architecture feel spacious, almost as though it’s levitating.”
David and Annemie's daughter swings in the living room. A door provides access to the lush backyard and surrounding area. “The kids have a lot of freedom. They have a big area where they can go and play without needing supervision,” says Annemie.
Cozy interiors with simple finishes allow the focus to remain steadily on the verdant natural surroundings. "The house is located in the middle of an overwhelming forest, so we [put the] focus on nature...and the wildflowers on the roof," explains Nakamura.
Materials for the interior were chosen to foster a relaxed vacation home atmosphere. Teak floors and pine beams create a warmth and easiness in the main living space, while helping to establish a natural dialogue with the forested landscape.
In the summer, the expansive living room doors slide open to remove all barriers between outside and in. Through gravity ventilation, air flows in through this large opening in the lowest zone and upwards through the home, keeping it comfortable and breezy.
The deck adjacent to the master bedroom in the main house has views over the ocean. The chimney flue from the ground floor fireplace cuts through the corner of the deck, making the semioutdoor space useable even in cold weather.
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
All truss components in the AvrameUSA kits use LVL (laminated veneer lumber) to achieve high snow, wind, and seismic ratings. The A-frame structure can hit load requirements in over 94 percent of U.S. jurisdictions.
The original floors were "horrible" laminate, says Edgar. During the renovation, they were replaced with Douglas fir timber flooring that matches the timber structure of the home. The kitchen cabinets are sapele timber, and a cost-effective timber-effect laminate has been used on the kitchen countertops.
The home’s interior is a colorful homage to ’60s and ’70s California surf shacks.
Double-glazed sliding doors connect the living area with the covered outdoor deck in the LivingHome Piha. The bedrooms are tucked away in a separate two-story wing.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
When designing her weekend getaway in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, architect Fernanda Canales knew the remote nature of the plateau and erratic weather conditions would prove tricky. In addition to withstanding the harsh climate, the house would need to also be self-sufficient. To embrace the beauty of the landscape while being open to sun exposure, the home wraps around four courtyards. Brick and concrete with high thermal mass create the foundation; its red hue and rough texture are juxtaposed against smooth concrete and wood inside. A unique facet to the home are the arches in the roofline—barrel-vaulted ceilings span the family room and all the bedrooms.
The view from the opposite end, where an additional loft area is used as the children’s bedroom. Plywood ceilings complement the hardwood floors below.
Covered, veranda-like spaces on both sides provide shady areas to sit and relax.
A large living/dining area stands at the heart of the home. The soaring pitched ceiling creates a tent-like atmosphere, while sliders open both sides to the outdoors.
A look inside the 1,800-square-foot, three-bedroom, 2.5-bath barnHouse with a soaring living room ceiling.
Infused with traditional materials and aesthetics, this open-plan home in Japan strengthens the bond a young family has to nature and to each other.
The sun-soaked living area is furnished with a vintage reed mat made by the Tuareg tribe of North Africa (purchased at a flea market), a Toga sofa from Ligne Roset, and a Saarinen table with Tolix red stools.
Taking advantage of the double-height space, the architects created a wall of windows to flood the living area with natural light and frame west-facing views. “At sunset, rays of light literally go all the way through the house,” note the architects.
The focal point of the living room is the large southeasterly projecting window that frames views of the town, Hautapu River, and the Ruahine Range.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
The home’s Japanese name loosely translates to “Sun House”—which is apt, given its emphasis on natural light. Three sets of full-height doors slide away to open the interior to the outdoors, while the angled roof eaves deflect unwanted solar gain in the summer without blocking access to the low winter sun.
The design of the house follows the traditional Japanese architectural concept of a hiraya—a single-story home with an engawa-inspired deck.
The compact living area is flanked by floor-to-ceiling glazing to bring the outdoors in. The show unit has been furnished with a Futón Tanoshi sofa, a Bandido Studio coffee table, and a Natural Urbano floor lamp.
As with all Cover projects, Leslie’s home features floor-to-ceiling windows, Wolf-Sub Zero appliances, integrated storage, and minimalist track lighting. The open-plan living areas are arranged axially toward views of the valley.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
Inspired by Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetics, the modern Orchid tiny house features an interior clad in three-quarter-inch maple plywood.
A look inside the post-and-beam screen porch built with locally sourced eastern white pine. The floors are Port Orford cedar.
The space after renovations, with cantilevering cabinetry along the perimeter to preserve and protect Hall's original radiant heating vents in the windowsills—an example of his innovative solutions for meeting the space's functional needs.
The studio's wraparound deck can be accessed from all sides of the building.
Tasked by John Powers and Jennifer Bostic with renovating a run-down cottage that was never meant to be lived in year round, Otto Ruano of Lead Studios transformed the space while keeping as much of it intact as possible. Potence lamps by Jean Prouvé illuminate the kitchen and living area. The bifold doors are by Loewen.
Designed for “utilizing every cubic centimeter to its utmost,” the compact cabin feels large thanks to full-height glazing and clean, minimalist design.
The House in Kyoto illuminated with select lighting at night.
The children's room is located directly above the kitchen so that they get to experience the full expanse of the house every time they descend to the ground-floor living area.
Since the house is edged in by homes on the east, west, and south sides, the architect punctuated the gabled roof with large skylights to bring daylight into the home.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
The existing wood structure and ceiling of the former saloon were completely refinished, and the exposed rafters were painted white for a brighter and more spacious feel. The old windows, floors, and finishes were replaced to create consistency with the new house.
The great room features floor-to-ceiling windows, a floating fireplace, exposed beams, lofty vaulted ceilings, and a multimillion-dollar view.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
The open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room are located on the side of the loft closest to the windows.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.