38 Living Room Storage Pendant Lighting End Tables Design Photos And Ideas

Chen designed circular copper bases for the Bluestone to create a coffee table with gravitas. The light is the Artemide Aggregato ceiling light with a counterweight.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
Furniture is now placed within the confines of the platform to create a defined seating area.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
The informal side entrance leads right into the open living space, which hosts a family room, dining room, and kitchen.
A Pluto Chandelier from One Kings Lane hovers over the relaxed seating area, complete with leather swivel chairs from Bed Bath & Beyond.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
A Juliette balcony with double French doors allows the ocean breezes to fill this stylish retreat, which has high, vaulted ceilings.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The sitting area is finished with dark surfaces and heavy, antique furnishings.
The focal point of the room is "Thunder Face" by Paul Fuentes, a David Bowie-inspired print that features the model Ronja Okane as a 21st-century superhero. The fabric on the walls, ceiling, and furniture were sourced from Gaston and Daniela.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
The Zyklus chair in the sitting area has been reupholstered in Pierre Frey velvet.
The mansion has multiple spaces for entertaining, including this light-filled living room with bay windows.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
The light-filled living area includes a Le Corbusier leather chair and a caned lounge chair. A door on the far wall opens up to a balcony space.
An Eames lounge and a rug from HD Buttercup.
The view from the kitchen.
The renovation opened the kitchen to the living space and added an island for increased prep and storage space.
The living room flows into the kitchen.
A Cosmorelax Essex sofa sits in the living area, along with Maxalto Fulgens armchairs.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.
Continuous clerestory windows provide views out into the surroundings at all edges. The butterfly roof appears to hover atop the structure.
Plum accents, including a Saarinen Womb chair in aubergine Rivington fabric by KnollTextiles, complement the apartment’s exposed brick. The trio of Paper tables, designed by GamFratesi for Gubi, can nest in various formations, while a Clear Ice chandelier from ABC Carpet & Home and semisheer curtains made by Beckenstein Fabric & Interiors lend the room a soft glow.
The house is like an anthology of modern design, spread out across 4,300 square feet. In the formal living room alone, there’s a Japan chair by Finn Juhl, a Hang-It-All rack by Charles and Ray Eames, a Scissor chair by Pierre Jeanneret, a Wiggle stool by Frank Gehry, and an Akari lamp by Isamu Noguchi. George began his collection in the 1990s with a pair of Paul McCobb stools, which sit near the fireplace.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.