142 Living Room Storage Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Living Room
Chen designed circular copper bases for the Bluestone to create a coffee table with gravitas. The light is the Artemide Aggregato ceiling light with a counterweight.
The oak cabinet in the living room was another secondhand find. “It had the exact measurements of the wall,” says Annemie. “We just needed to hang it.” The throw blanket is from La Femme Garniture while the pillows and pendants are custom.
Inside, workaday concrete floors contrast with the home's clean lines and soft touches.
Concrete from the exterior continues indoors as a fireplace surround. For the couch, Annemie found the wooden base and cushion covers in a secondhand store and used baby mattresses as inserts. David made the oak back.
London-based husband and wife design duo Chan + Eayrs turned a loft apartment in a former shoe factory into the Beldi—a stunning, richly textured contemporary home.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
"The angular geometry of the catwalk trusses, the kitchen island, and the bathroom projection together with the 60-degree pitched roof make the project’s geometry performative and visually interesting," says Edgar.
Whitney updated the living room by employing a light palette and rich textures. Beige linen covers the built-in sofa cushions; the pale tone maintains a feeling of spaciousness.
With a budget of £10,400 (approximately $13,000), Intervention Architecture transformed a tiny apartment into a minimalist studio. The firm worked with a cabinetmaker to design a custom unit and centerpiece for the space.
Like much of the Italian Riviera, La Spezia on the Ligurian coast has a long maritime history. It was precisely this seafaring legacy that inspired the design of this tiny home, a 377-square-feet apartment that was reconfigured to clearly separate the living and sleeping areas. A cabinetry wall is constructed with marine plywood.
Natural light bounces off all-white color palette, enhancing both the home's sense of space and bright, airy aesthetic.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
A cantilevered addition creates more space for the kitchen and pantry, as well as this cozy new family nook.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
After: The industrial accents were kept at the ceiling in a nod to its past. The city required interior insulation to fulfill code, which meant McCuen was unable to expose the more rough, industrial texture on the walls.
The original living room was converted into an open-plan kitchen and dining area with a living room that can be reconfigured into a bedroom. The use of natural materials and the large windows that flood the space with natural light and frame the views make the small space feel bright and airy.
Furniture is now placed within the confines of the platform to create a defined seating area.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
Reveals at the ceiling highlight the wooden roof detail in this Taiwan apartment remodel.
Living space
Living space
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
Stairs to basement, concealed by a curated art collection.
A door was replaced with an internal window that sheds light on the stairwell and a cat flap, so that the cats can move between rooms even if the kitchen door is closed.
The unit is 3.5 meters long and 2.4 meters tall, and is a chic focal point in the room.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
The existing living room received modern built-in storage and blue paint that syncs with the addition.
The informal side entrance leads right into the open living space, which hosts a family room, dining room, and kitchen.
A Pluto Chandelier from One Kings Lane hovers over the relaxed seating area, complete with leather swivel chairs from Bed Bath & Beyond.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
A clear delineation lies between the oak-clad box that houses the entry, kitchen, and bathroom on the right, and the white-walled living room and bedroom.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
The simple form of the Dog Room lets it blend in with a range of styles, for interior or exterior use.
A Juliette balcony with double French doors allows the ocean breezes to fill this stylish retreat, which has high, vaulted ceilings.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The sitting area is finished with dark surfaces and heavy, antique furnishings.
A casual bar area is immediately elevated by elegant hardwood, while a breezy sitting room is perfect for entertaining.
The focal point of the room is "Thunder Face" by Paul Fuentes, a David Bowie-inspired print that features the model Ronja Okane as a 21st-century superhero. The fabric on the walls, ceiling, and furniture were sourced from Gaston and Daniela.
Spaces flow freely from one to the next, creating a continuous open floor plan.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
The Zyklus chair in the sitting area has been reupholstered in Pierre Frey velvet.
The mansion has multiple spaces for entertaining, including this light-filled living room with bay windows.
A boldly patterned black-and-white cabinet is the star of this stair hall and entryway, which has accents of rich golds that shine against a neutral taupe wall. Sculptural light fixtures also help give the space a sense of personality and richness.
The use of light colors on the walls and ceiling of The Pacific Pioneer by Handcrafted Movement keeps the two lofted sleeping spaces at either end of the tiny home from feeling claustrophobic, while the blues, greens, and natural wood of the furniture and cabinetry are simple but thoughtful.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.