41 Living Room Storage Table Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Designer Ralph Germann inserted a partially glazed box into a 19th-century barn to form the main living space of Christine Bonvin’s home in Switzerland. Soft light enters through original arrow-loop windows.
The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
Living Room
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
Using a natural material palette helps Ridge Mountain Residence by Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects blend in with its surroundings: the concrete complements the light browns and tans of the surrounding mountains, while Cor-ten steel cladding provides a naturally weathering material.
After: The industrial accents were kept at the ceiling in a nod to its past. The city required interior insulation to fulfill code, which meant McCuen was unable to expose the more rough, industrial texture on the walls.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
A view down the aisle to the bathroom, with the kitchen on the left and the eat/work counter on the right. The Modern Caravan combined walnut cabinetry and red oak flooring, with white counters, tile, and walls.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
"They wanted a very practical house, with separate zones for kids and adults," said Taugbøl. "Because of the split levels, the experience of the space varies when you walk through it," and ascend the staircase. "The acoustics are also great due to the wood paneling in the ceiling." The Raimond pendent lights are from moooi, and the fireplace seating is IKEA.
Retractable walls allow the interior to fluidly merge with its natural surroundings. Per the architects: "While trying to always maintain the relationship between built and wild, the indoors opens completely to allow the breeze and the red sunset light to inundate the space."
The cedar-clad interior provides protection from the sun and orients views towards the ocean.
The lower level also features has a board-formed concrete fireplace.
The Dining and Living Room
To maximize space in this tiny 323-square-foot studio Budapest apartment, local design studio POSITION Collective used an elevated, plywood sleeping unit inspired by Japanese “tansu” mobile cabinetry, with secrete storage modules on the side of the steps leading up to the futon bed.
Wide French doors extend the indoors out to a gracious patio and fire pit.
Once the structural shell of a Deltec home is built, the interior is finished just as a traditionally constructed house would be.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
In the living room, a custom chaise by Shimna and an Archibald Gran Comfort chair by Poltrona Frau surround a custom lacquer coffee table by BenchCraft.The lights, made from recycled cardboard, are by Seattle design studio Graypants.
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.“This wasn’t a traditional Santa Barbara site with large acreage,” Hector says. “It was small and steep.” Expansive windows on the second floor face a park.
In the living room, a vintage Danish chair faces a sectional upholstered  in Knoll fabric. The Nelson Ball clock is from Vitra and the throw pillows include a Jonathan Adler Seahorse design. Acacia flooring from Reward Hardwood Flooring was used throughout.
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Santa Monica, California
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
Living Room

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.