30 Living Room Storage Table Medium Hardwood Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
A view from the kitchen out toward the living area provides a sense of the lofted interior.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The view from the opposite end, where an additional loft area is used as the children’s bedroom. Plywood ceilings complement the hardwood floors below.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
Untouched, chipped orange and green painted concrete beams are a major element throughout the apartment, adding a patina that cannot be replicated through modern processes
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
The Dining and Living Room
Built-in bunks are decked out with a private window for viewing the outdoors, and an adjustable reading light from Prima Lighting.  A simple pendant hangs above the main space.
Once the structural shell of a Deltec home is built, the interior is finished just as a traditionally constructed house would be.
The small dining counter with Glenn bar stools.
The family room features custom-designed furnishings by the homeowner using exotic wood slabs.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.