110 Living Room Storage Table Design Photos And Ideas

Skylights and windows bask the warm birchwood interior in natural light.
The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
A view from the kitchen out toward the living area provides a sense of the lofted interior.
Living Room
With limited square footage indoors, the space gets dirty very quickly, especially in a damp climate where Emma’s two girls are constantly tracking in mud and dirt. Getting a good’s night rest can be a challenge, and privacy is hard to come by.
It was important to try to keep the seating and bedding on the outer edges of the floor plan due to the extreme slope of the roofline. As a result, the main walkway is located in the center of the bus.
In the living area, a pair of rattan chairs found at the Paul Bert flea market in Paris join a coffee table designed by Guillerme et Chambron, also a flea-market find. A custom rug by CODIMAT was made in Madagascar.
Like much of the Italian Riviera, La Spezia on the Ligurian coast has a long maritime history. It was precisely this seafaring legacy that inspired the design of this tiny home, a 377-square-feet apartment that was reconfigured to clearly separate the living and sleeping areas. A cabinetry wall is constructed with marine plywood.
The custom-built shaker-style cabinets are made of ultralight plywood and topped with Glacier White Corian countertops.
Natural light bounces off all-white color palette, enhancing both the home's sense of space and bright, airy aesthetic.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
The chair and the fireplace in the living area are vintage, and the dresser is from Target.
The view from the opposite end, where an additional loft area is used as the children’s bedroom. Plywood ceilings complement the hardwood floors below.
Using a natural material palette helps Ridge Mountain Residence by Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects blend in with its surroundings: the concrete complements the light browns and tans of the surrounding mountains, while Cor-ten steel cladding provides a naturally weathering material.
After: The industrial accents were kept at the ceiling in a nod to its past. The city required interior insulation to fulfill code, which meant McCuen was unable to expose the more rough, industrial texture on the walls.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
Living space
Living space
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
A view down the aisle to the bathroom, with the kitchen on the left and the eat/work counter on the right. The Modern Caravan combined walnut cabinetry and red oak flooring, with white counters, tile, and walls.
Different shades of brown can bring a calm, earthy feel to living rooms and studies.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Architect Rebal Knayzeh's favorite detail is "the flush door which aligns perfectly with the 'window' in the room, and the door to the apartment. Making sure that this object-interface remains self-contained without any hardware sticking out was important."
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
Curtains separate the front—where kids dance and partake in carpentry—from the play area in the rear.
Whether it's merely picking up toys or performing spontaneous plays, an active imagination is always celebrated here.
Custom modular furniture and a slide that conjures indoor playground vibes are among the highlights at the sustainably minded Lion International Kindergarten.
The loft features a lounging area and a cozy, built-in sleeping nook beside a window. Originally, the dome had a full second floor, but the result was a choppy layout of small spaces. “There was no good living area,” says Sam. “My instinct was to open it all up.” When he’s not at the property, he rents it out. The bedding is from Parachute Home.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
Untouched, chipped orange and green painted concrete beams are a major element throughout the apartment, adding a patina that cannot be replicated through modern processes
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
The entrance to the home leads to an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area.
When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.
This voluminous cabin in Austin, Quebec, has a sharply pitched roof and a bright and lofty interior that strikes surprising contrast to its austere, angular exterior.
"They wanted a very practical house, with separate zones for kids and adults," said Taugbøl. "Because of the split levels, the experience of the space varies when you walk through it," and ascend the staircase. "The acoustics are also great due to the wood paneling in the ceiling." The Raimond pendent lights are from moooi, and the fireplace seating is IKEA.
Most of the furnishings are from from Globe West.
Retractable walls allow the interior to fluidly merge with its natural surroundings. Per the architects: "While trying to always maintain the relationship between built and wild, the indoors opens completely to allow the breeze and the red sunset light to inundate the space."
The cedar-clad interior provides protection from the sun and orients views towards the ocean.
A dining area on the lower level, and a study on the upper level.
The renovation opened the kitchen to the living space and added an island for increased prep and storage space.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
The lower level also features has a board-formed concrete fireplace.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.