124 Living Room Storage Chair Design Photos And Ideas

Architect Albert Lanier transformed Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stockdale's Berkeley Victorian into a bright, open-plan residence that holds a treasure trove of work done by the couple and their friends. A small bedroom is tucked in the back of the upstairs aerie.
Midcentury furniture, and thoughtful accents make this holiday rental a truly delightful way to enjoy Norway's Vestfold County.
A sleek, scalloped magazine rack
An industrial style steel staircase gives the space a cool Manhattan warehouse look.
The mezzanine level
Bowie and Malboeuf’s unit occupies three levels facing the property’s backyard. The living-dining room has a mix of vintage pieces—a Wassily chair by Marcel Breuer and an LC4 chaise by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, and Charlotte Perriand—alongside furniture from CB2.
A handful of modernist classics—an Eames Lounge, a Bubble Lamp by George Nelson, and a shell armchair from Modernica—kit out the living room and kitchen.
The living area now feels open and bright and showcases the couple’s appreciation for furniture design and artwork. The family opted for a Camber sectional and rug from Design Within Reach, coffee table from Steven Alan Home, and replica Eames Lounge to outfit the space.
A Wilhelmina chair by Ilmari Tapiovaara furnishes the living area.
A lounge is furnished with a Mags Soft sofa, an Ella coffee table, and a pair of Ray Lounge Chairs by Foersom Hiort-Lorenzen, all from Hay, and a Wow ottoman and tabletop by Pedrali.
Wide French doors extend the indoors out to a gracious patio and fire pit.
London studio AMA uses bold Bauhaus colors to invigorate Chevron House, a five-bedroom home in a brick Edwardian building in West London.
A sitting area with a stove creates a cozy sense of

Photo courtesy of Tobias Laarmann
To maximize space in this tiny 323-square-foot studio Budapest apartment, local design studio POSITION Collective used an elevated, plywood sleeping unit inspired by Japanese “tansu” mobile cabinetry, with secrete storage modules on the side of the steps leading up to the futon bed.
Fashion designer Josie and her husband Ken Natori are big fans of traditional Japanese architecture, so when Brooklyn-based practice Tsao & McKown Architects designed their home in Pound Ridge, New York, they used a heavy, exposed-timber structure, and included Japanese-style gardens and landscaping.
Abbes and Davison removed drywall to expose the brick on one wall in the living room. "As we began to expose that brick, we found the old metal framing that they used to use," Daivson says. "They used to stick chicken-mesh wire on it and put plaster on top. When we exposed the brick, we found this metal detail and decided to keep it." Photo by Alan Gastelum.
Cedar wood seamlessly extends from inside to outside, creating a continuous extension to the woods beyond.   Adirondack chairs provide the perfect viewing point from the balcony.
Built-in bunks are decked out with a private window for viewing the outdoors, and an adjustable reading light from Prima Lighting.  A simple pendant hangs above the main space.
Once the structural shell of a Deltec home is built, the interior is finished just as a traditionally constructed house would be.
“In an eighteen-foot-wide brownstone, there’s only so much you can do. But we wanted  it to feel fresh,” Keith Burns, architect and resident
Viewed from the entryway, the living room is the main gathering space of the home. Dated parquet floors were replaced with modern ceramic tile. All walls and ceilings were re-plastered, and old windows were upgraded with energy-efficient double-glazed glass.
Near a Gent wood-burning stove by Thorma in the living area, an IKEA Poäng chair and ottoman provide a cozy spot for reading. Thanks to the passive design strategies utilized by Ovchinnikov, the house stays warm through the winter with only minimal heating required.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
A linear lacquer storage unit with a Corian top helped define the main living areas; now the residents spend more time enjoying the apartment’s northern exposure–one of two main sources of natural light in the floor-through loft.
A darker blue hue adds richness to the built in casework in the living space.
The windows on the right look out to Manhattan. The blue Acapulco chair echoes the aquatic tones of the bathroom tiles.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.
Continuous clerestory windows provide views out into the surroundings at all edges. The butterfly roof appears to hover atop the structure.
Beside the fireplace is a Nexus 21 lift system, which is used to hide the television when it’s off.
The original home occupies a prominent hilltop overlooking Silicon Valley and faces into the pristine rolling hills of a nature preserve at the end of the house receiving the new addition. Taking cues from dominant natural elements of the surrounding densely wooded hillside – boulders, bark, and leaves – SaA created a two-story addition with the visual weight needed to anchor the long axis of the extended original house. Against this, the architects balanced steel-framed stair treads and awnings that cantilever from minimal structural supports as if leaves from a slender branch.
family room with barn door
Furniture throughout the house echoes the soft materiality of the architectural details, which include original pine floorboards refinished with lye and wood soap. The music room armchair and footstool are vintage, from Ercol; the blue-gray Grasshopper floor lamp is by Greta Grossman from Gubi.
Custom details designed by Studiopietropoli include a sculptural fireplace/media center in the living room.
In the library, a Grant sleeper sofa by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams is paired with a Cigar wall sconce by George Nelson.
The sunny double height living space features custom concrete tiles,  plaster walls with built-in niche storage, and a custom slatted wood door leads to an indoor storage area.
In the living room, a custom chaise by Shimna and an Archibald Gran Comfort chair by Poltrona Frau surround a custom lacquer coffee table by BenchCraft.The lights, made from recycled cardboard, are by Seattle design studio Graypants.
The husband’s home office is furnished by a Toot lounge chair by Piero Lissoni for Cassina, a vintage Desk BO69 by Finn Juhl, and a Swivel chair by Hans Wegner. A custom picture rail, filled with family photos, is made of bands of wood that keep contents in place.
In the second floor lounge, a Flex sleeper sofa in Gravel from CB2 sits opposite an antique Chinese coffee table Flanders inherited from her grandmother.
An original 1961 Mole armchair and ottoman—an iconic Sérgio Rodrigues design made from oversize tufted leather cushions and rounded wood frames—sits in the office.
The small dining counter with Glenn bar stools.
A suspended oak sideboard runs the length of the living room. The project leads designed that piece and the black-painted metal shelves on the wall; both were fabricated by Giuseppe Motta,a local artisan. A 14.1 pendant by Omer Arbel for Bocci hangs near one end.
Zoning laws determined the maximum square footage of the guesthouse; as a workaround, Schwartz created a detached two-car garage, which did not count toward the dwelling’s overall size. In addition to the breezeway and the overhang, a series of ipe slats unite the two structures, covering the doors and a walkway in between. The living area is furnished with a Raleigh sofa and armchair by Jeffrey Bernett and Nicholas Dodziuk; the direct-vent gas stove is by Jøtul.
Resident Paul Andersson lounges in a Paulistano armchair by Paulo Mendes da Rocha.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.

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