194 Living Room Sofa Track Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

An accent pillow isn't the only place where neutral palettes can get some color. In this Hollywood Hills living room, Pickens creates a cohesive palette by using the same shades on the walls, rug, and side tables.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
A macramé wall hanging serves as large-scale, textural artwork in this sitting room.
The living room features a Cheminee Philippe wood-burning fireplace, which has a large heating capacity. By placing it below the void, it is able to heat both the downstairs and common areas upstairs.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
While thoughtfully updated for modern-day living, the loft retains a trove of original details, including built-in cabinetry that was part of the original classroom space. One can imagine the units filled with microscopes or specimens during the building's schoolhouse past.
Conveniently located near downtown Detroit, Apartment No. 39 is the latest Leland Lofts condo to hit the market. Offered for $324,000, the 1,360-square-foot space features a spacious open layout and was recently treated to a top-down renovation. Restored hardwoods run throughout.
When the homeowners of this 1960 home in Portland’s Southwest Hills bought the property in 2009, they became the new owners of a lot of white carpeting, tired woodwork, dated wallpaper, and lackluster storage. Over time, they came to wish for a home that better suited their lives, but didn’t want to sacrifice the excellent midcentury bones. A two-pronged renovation became the answer to their problems. For the first phase completed in 2016, Fieldwork Design + Architecture remodeled the main floor. The firm swapped out the white carpeting for warm cork flooring, then strategically inserted variegated cedar planking. Fireplace surrounds received new plaster to bring in a subtle, earthy texture. Sharp black accents, whether via dining chairs or new patio doors, add definition. Fieldwork replaced the trim around the windows with CVG fir and added variegated cedar planking for warmth and texture. For the second phase of the transformation, which wrapped in 2019, Annie Wise of Annie Wise Design stepped in for a gut remodel of the kitchen and master bathroom, with the goal of ensuring any changes remained consistent with what had already been done.
Large slabs of slate were used throughout the home for flooring, adding a natural element.
"The balcony is kept at the same height as the interior floor and built with similar materials and colors to extend the interior space," says the firm. "Additionally, the interior floor looks like a part of the balcony, thereby erasing the interior–exterior boundary. This design provides residents the feeling of living in nature even though they are actually living in a skyscraper."
"The curve at the ceiling blurs the boundary between roofs and wall," says the firm.
Reveals at the ceiling highlight the wooden roof detail in this Taiwan apartment remodel.
"The bold concrete forms [in DS House] create a blank backdrop for the reinstatement of the indigenous landscape after bushfires...triggered a requirement for the majority of the vegetation to be removed,
Inside the southern pavilion of this Australian home, there is the primary open-plan living space, a study, a laundry room, and a guest bedroom and bath. A streamlined kitchen is defined by its white cabinetry against the surrounding cedar walls. Jackson Clements Burrows Architects led the project.
Inspired by Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetics, the modern Orchid tiny house features an interior clad in three-quarter-inch maple plywood.
Another 20 loft homes are available in the concrete building starting on the second floor. These spacious residences will feature wide white oak flooring, along with restored concrete beams and columns.
A look at the spacious family room, which features additional built-ins, wooden beams and paneling, as well as clerestory windows that invite long rays of natural light into the space.
Smartly tucked underneath the stairs is a full bath.
The windows, which tower over 16 feet, provide plenty of natural light for the cabin.
The living room boasts a bright blue epoxy “rug” and tables fashioned from logs.
The main living area follows the same minimalist style, with enough room for a large table, sofa, and built-in work area. A large sliding door leads out to the rear deck.
The Artichoke light in bronze from Louis Poulsen joins Vitra cork stools and leather couches from Borge Mogensen.
Now, a custom, steel-clad fireplace chimney stretches over 4.5 meters tall and imparts a sense of hygge. It was "designed as a contemporary take on the pressed copper flues typical of the era, while complementing and increasing the effect of the existing raked ceilings to the space," says the firm.
The floors and ceiling throughout are American oak. A floor-to-ceiling, plate-glass window measuring 2.8 meters wide (or about nine feet) overlooks the entry courtyard.
The textiles and furniture selected for the family room in particular echo the feeling of casual comfort, with wood shelving continuing from the kitchen and low, informal couches.
Another view of the living room. Glimmering metal finishes, polished stone, and jewel-colored furnishings contrast with the heft of the granite blocks that anchor the house.
The light-filled living room features one of the home's original built-in fireplaces.
Considered the first Usonian prototype, the Jacobs House (or Jacobs I) in Madison, WI (constructed 1936-1937) was built for just $5,000 in its day and was the model for affordable, middle-class housing in mid-century America.
Exposed structural beams are a historic nod to the loft’s previous life as a 19th-century warehouse and shipping dock. For the Copes, inspiration for creative projects never draws far from home; they named Calico after their cat, Irie.
At the core of the home is a magnificent stone fireplace. The warmth of natural woods line all of the living spaces, and bold art forms rooted in the natural world complement the lodge-like atmosphere of the great room.
Expansive glazing allows gorgeous natural light to flood throughout.
In Lorne, Victoria, Austin Maynard Architects gave an old shack near the beach a modern revamp and a timber extension that allows for elevated sea views. With interiors lined in recycled Silvertop Ash, the house oozes a cozy, cabin-like feel.
DS House provides its inhabitants with a relaxed, private atmosphere. Planned Living Architects' extensive use of timber complements the raw, tactile character of the in situ concrete walls.
Sam and his team ripped out the dilapidated drywall and kept the interior light by going with an off-the-shelf white paint for the walls and ceiling, which he accented with oiled birch hardwood. “I thought about doing wainscoting,” he says, “but decided to keep it simple.” His friend Julia Ehrlich oversaw the interior design; the two found many of the living room’s vintage pieces at flea markets in L.A.
Creating a beautiful home isn’t just about impressing guests and surrounding yourself with pretty things. It’s about creating spaces to feel relaxed, comfortable and at peace.
An asymmetrical stone fireplace is a dramatic focal point in the open plan.
Sliding glass doors enable easy indoor/outdoor circulation.
The family cozied up on the sofa.
The view from the entry now encompasses open and airy living spaces that connect to the garden via floor-to-ceiling glass.
The dining nook sits between the kitchen and the living room.
Finding a wheelchair accessible home in New York City can be a challenge, but after a diving accident left David Carmel paralyzed from the waist down, Carmel knew he was looking for a home that was "accessible but not institutional." Working with Della Valle Bernheimer, they made an apartment that is both beautiful and accessible, with a lightweight sliding wall that closes off the bedroom from the living area.
The AutoEC ceiling lights are from Amazon.
A fireplace with a floating chimney is the central element of this part of the lobby.
The common area in this penthouse by Studio RHE boasts a digital cube ceiling, stunning views, and an immense book collection by the bar.
INT2 architecture used a variety of different materials to delineate spaces throughout Interior KG. The living room features a light wood herringbone parquet and several rows of shelves.
The To Be One and Lean On Me floor lamps in the lounge area are by OKHA.
The Nate's communal lounge and kitchen.
“I love traveling and recollecting a lot of memories from my journeys,” says Serboli. “I believe that all of this has influenced the design of the apartment.”

“Consciously, I wanted to expose some objects and already knew where to put them before I even had bought the apartment,” he explains. “In an unconscious way, funnily enough, a couple of months after the end of the work, I found a forgotten photo of a trip to Mozambique, of me in a colonial house with small blue round columns, ivory floor and coral-colored doors.”
While Serboli preserved some period elements—namely the bedroom doors and floors—the living room floors could not be fully salvaged, largely due to the removal of several partitions. As such, the new floor is a continuous slab of ivory-colored micro-cement. The cozy living room features a Mags sofa and CAN chair, both by HAY, and a ZigZag stool from Kettal.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.