125 Living Room Sofa Storage Design Photos And Ideas

"The asymmetrical volume, enveloping form, chiaroscuro effect of the curved corridor, shadows, margins, thresholds, voids, and raw materials allow the unique atmosphere of the place to emerge without concealing the structural logic of the house," says Antonio Di Bacco of Atelier Barda.
The Dining and Living Room
The large windows open to the deck, giving the room a strong connection to the outdoors.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
Eric Schneider and Michael Chen take in the space-efficient renovation.
The home is airy and bright—enveloped in natural lighting thanks to large expanses of glass and clerestory windows.
The spacious living room opens to the dining area which sits off the kitchen.
The sofa converts to a queen-size bed complete with a Casper mattress. Bedding tucks away neatly in the storage below.
The dark woodwork added to the appreciation of the home's Hudson River views.
“The Future Perfect comes into the homes with this project and intervenes throughout,” says founder David Alhadeff. “We look for properties where the work that we do will fit and suit the space beautifully. For this Casa we focused on decorative treatments like wallpaper, hardware, and lighting to alter the space.”
The main living area features pieces by George Nakashima and Sam Maloof. Japanese tansu cabinets frame the space, each adorned with artwork and souvenirs from nature.
To make the space feel larger, the couple opted for white walls and a minimal color palette.
Midcentury furniture, and thoughtful accents make this holiday rental a truly delightful way to enjoy Norway's Vestfold County.
An industrial style steel staircase gives the space a cool Manhattan warehouse look.
Timber floors add warmth to the compact apartment.
A close-up of the entry. Note the organization tricks for a small space, such as the tray, wall hooks and message board, and paper catchall.
Now, looking towards the front of the bus, two couches face each other. The couches can seat the whole family and also be converted into a full-sized bed, if needed. There is storage in the couch bases and a shoe shelf by the front door. The Mayes Team writes on their blog: "This has been such a blessing and has helped us to keep the bus organized."
In the living room, ethereal white curtains soften the severity of the concrete walls.
Bowie and Malboeuf’s unit occupies three levels facing the property’s backyard. The living-dining room has a mix of vintage pieces—a Wassily chair by Marcel Breuer and an LC4 chaise by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, and Charlotte Perriand—alongside furniture from CB2.
A handful of modernist classics—an Eames Lounge, a Bubble Lamp by George Nelson, and a shell armchair from Modernica—kit out the living room and kitchen.
A lounge is furnished with a Mags Soft sofa, an Ella coffee table, and a pair of Ray Lounge Chairs by Foersom Hiort-Lorenzen, all from Hay, and a Wow ottoman and tabletop by Pedrali.
London studio AMA uses bold Bauhaus colors to invigorate Chevron House, a five-bedroom home in a brick Edwardian building in West London.
A sitting area with a stove creates a cozy sense of
Cedar wood seamlessly extends from inside to outside, creating a continuous extension to the woods beyond.   Adirondack chairs provide the perfect viewing point from the balcony.
Built-in bunks are decked out with a private window for viewing the outdoors, and an adjustable reading light from Prima Lighting.  A simple pendant hangs above the main space.
Once the structural shell of a Deltec home is built, the interior is finished just as a traditionally constructed house would be.
The main room is conceived as a series of revolving scenes, bracketed by cabinets and a wall of FilzFelt, layered in panels to dampen sound.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
A linear lacquer storage unit with a Corian top helped define the main living areas; now the residents spend more time enjoying the apartment’s northern exposure–one of two main sources of natural light in the floor-through loft.
All furnishings were purchased on a budget. The rug and Friheten sleeper sectional in the living room, the Luftig oven hood, Norrsjön sink, Sektion cabinetry, and countertop in the kitchen, and the small dining counter with Glenn bar stools were all sourced from IKEA.
The windows on the right look out to Manhattan. The blue Acapulco chair echoes the aquatic tones of the bathroom tiles.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.
Continuous clerestory windows provide views out into the surroundings at all edges. The butterfly roof appears to hover atop the structure.
The original home occupies a prominent hilltop overlooking Silicon Valley and faces into the pristine rolling hills of a nature preserve at the end of the house receiving the new addition. Taking cues from dominant natural elements of the surrounding densely wooded hillside – boulders, bark, and leaves – SaA created a two-story addition with the visual weight needed to anchor the long axis of the extended original house. Against this, the architects balanced steel-framed stair treads and awnings that cantilever from minimal structural supports as if leaves from a slender branch.
A series of round cushions piled atop the floor make for a casual lounge area in the upstairs apartment. Acting as both a room divider and a dramatic centerpiece, a custom dining table, created by Nathalie, hangs suspended from the ceiling. She also designed the kitchenette beyond, incorporating vintage cabinets by Danish midcentury designer Børge Mogensen.
In the library, a Grant sleeper sofa by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams is paired with a Cigar wall sconce by George Nelson.
The main living area is flanked by green spaces, with custom sliding doors made from materials sourced from a metal warehouse. The ceiling is corrugated sheet metal, a “common and cheap but noble” construction material, Teresa says.
A love of midcentury design marks the couple’s choice of living room furnishings, which include an Eames lounge chair and a Noguchi coffee table, paired with a sofa from HD Buttercup. The arching neck of the Prouvé Potence sconce mirrors the home’s exterior form, while the large Fleetwood sliding door extends the space to the outdoors.
In the living room, a custom chaise by Shimna and an Archibald Gran Comfort chair by Poltrona Frau surround a custom lacquer coffee table by BenchCraft.The lights, made from recycled cardboard, are by Seattle design studio Graypants.
The husband’s home office is furnished by a Toot lounge chair by Piero Lissoni for Cassina, a vintage Desk BO69 by Finn Juhl, and a Swivel chair by Hans Wegner. A custom picture rail, filled with family photos, is made of bands of wood that keep contents in place.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.