234 Living Room Sofa Medium Hardwood Floors Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
The addition of the antiqued mirrored panels amplifies natural light that the living room receives from the adjacent sunroom.
The haussmanien style was refined and pared down in order to introduce minimal lines better suited to the contemporary usage of this living space now occupied by a modern family.

The street art collection of the property owners (Banksy, Jon One, Space Invaders, Obey...) counterbalances the classic spaces of the double living room.
In the richly hued living room, a Milo Baughman coffee table with a chrome base and custom marble top pairs with Milo Baughman barrel chairs that have been reupholstered in a saturated blue fabric. A custom velvet sofa adds another textured layer. A custom light fixture with crystal bulbs from The Future Perfect hangs like jewelry above the space, and a geometric painting by senior JHID designer Chelsie Lee ties the colors together.
A plush yellow sectional from Camerich is paired with a Milo Baughman drum table and a Bertoia Diamond Lounge Chair. An O'lampia Retroline Duo pendant hangs above.
The oak cabinet in the living room was another secondhand find. “It had the exact measurements of the wall,” says Annemie. “We just needed to hang it.” The throw blanket is from La Femme Garniture while the pillows and pendants are custom.
David and Annemie's daughter swings in the living room. A door provides access to the lush backyard and surrounding area. “The kids have a lot of freedom. They have a big area where they can go and play without needing supervision,” says Annemie.
Concrete from the exterior continues indoors as a fireplace surround. For the couch, Annemie found the wooden base and cushion covers in a secondhand store and used baby mattresses as inserts. David made the oak back.
Natural light streams throughout the second floor thanks to the structural arch walls, which “subdivide the residential program without obscuring light and views.”
Just off the kitchen, the sitting room is encircled with custom steel joinery that frames the full-height double glazed windows and looks out on the pool in the middle of the garden-filled courtyard. The restored vintage Parker three-piece lounge set is from Australian midcentury furniture purveyor, Juliet's Balcony.
The view of the concrete and glass great room straight out to the pool and across to the garage in the back of the property which has a studio above it.
The cabin entry leads directly to a cozy living room with a fridge, a small live-edge counter, and a bar sink. Picture-frame windows are strategically placed to frame views of distant mountains.
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
A hammock chair in the living room overlooks the wood stove at the center and the sofa against the west wall, creating a cozy living space.
The main living area on the ground floor has 20-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan. The high ceilings allow the 395-square-foot home to feel expansive, light, and breezy. In cold weather, the owner grows seedlings by the south-facing windows.
“I’ve been looking at cabins and small homes since I was a teenager,” says the owner. “I knew I wanted the home to have a small footprint, but for the interior space to still feel open and expansive.” This informed the interior planning, as he knew he didn’t want the upper floors to completely enclose the ground floor. By minimizing the second floor and including an open third-floor loft bedroom, he was able to maintain a spacious feeling and avoid making the interior spaces feel too enclosed.
The great room is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the back of the space (which is just a slice of the all-glass rear) includes a bi-fold NanaWall door system that opens the home to an outdoor terrace and the lush surroundings.
All truss components in the AvrameUSA kits use LVL (laminated veneer lumber) to achieve high snow, wind, and seismic ratings. The A-frame structure can hit load requirements in over 94 percent of U.S. jurisdictions.
Orange was used as a leitmotif that weaves throughout the main level, with furnishings such as the mezzanine ladder, the sofa, and the kitchen tile.
"The angular geometry of the catwalk trusses, the kitchen island, and the bathroom projection together with the 60-degree pitched roof make the project’s geometry performative and visually interesting," says Edgar.
A rendered peek inside a 2X lightHouse model.
Whitney updated the living room by employing a light palette and rich textures. Beige linen covers the built-in sofa cushions; the pale tone maintains a feeling of spaciousness.
With a budget of £10,400 (approximately $13,000), Intervention Architecture transformed a tiny apartment into a minimalist studio. The firm worked with a cabinetmaker to design a custom unit and centerpiece for the space.
A sofa by Stephen Kenn Studio joins ceramic tables by artist Ben Medansky in the glass-walled living area. The AIM pendants are by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Flos and the Oda floor lamps are from Pulpo. The metal artworks are by Guy.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
The interior is marked by an open plan that allows all of the rooms to connect to the verdant surrounding through the transparent northern facade.
For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The interior of the cabin is constructed out of salvaged Douglas fir.
The living room is the largest and brightest space of the home. A bisecting staircase leads to the bedroom, kitchen, and living/dining room. As per the client’s desire for privacy and discretion, the furnishings have been staged by Etel Design.
The first step was to tear out the existing wall-to-wall carpeting and replace it with cabin-grade, oak flooring to give the house a classic feel and to help anchor the more modern walls and trim. They ordered the flooring from a large company and despite it being the cheapest option offered, the total expense came to $2,300 for materials, making the wood floors—according to Anderson—their biggest splurge.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
A look inside the 1,800-square-foot, three-bedroom, 2.5-bath barnHouse with a soaring living room ceiling.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard.
Homeowners Luciano Bedoya and Liya Moya worked with interior designer Augusta Pastor on the furnishings. The Ghost sofa is by Paola Navone for Gervasoni, the Beni Ourain rug is from Mascarpone Originale, the About A Lounge 92 chair is by Hay, and the coffee table is by Primas.
The house’s second floor, where one enters, combines the living, kitchen, and dining areas in one space beneath original architect Richard Campbell’s vaulted wood ceiling.
To add more space to her petite Florence apartment originally designed by Roberto Monsani, architect Silvia Allori incorporated fold-down furniture and storage into the white laminate walls that also support bookshelves.
A modern farmhouse outside Tahoe National Forest stands as a vacation home and gallery for the owner’s art. Designed by architect Clare Walton, Martis Camp House consists of four gable forms divided by stone-clad volumes. Inside, the spaces are a collaboration between the owner, an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. A departure from the owner’s main residence that exudes a more traditional style, the summer and winter getaway is teeming with bespoke furniture, vintage finds, and personal art.
The larger upper unit is spread out across two floors, with three large bedrooms, two baths, and access to two elevated garden spaces.
For this Eichler remodel, the objective was to respect the original bones with more thoughtful updates than what had come before. "Our goal was to design a beautiful mix of finishes that respected the timeless design intention of Eichler homes," say Sommer and Costello. "Rather than focus purely on historical renovation, we wanted to update the finishes and layout to ensure it lives on for the next generation."
Sliding glass doors open the lower-level living room to the outdoors. Stone steps bridge the sunken biofilter pond surrounding the home.
A long, slender skylight illuminates the top-floor lounge area. "The home’s location on the eastern slope of the creek ensures prolonged sunlight throughout the year, while also being optimally exposed to the prevailing rising air currents in the valley," states the firm.
A look inside the post-and-beam screen porch built with locally sourced eastern white pine. The floors are Port Orford cedar.
Sixteen-foot-long sliding doors open to a deck that feels more like a continuation of the living area than a distinctly outdoor space.
A loft takes advantage of the tall ceiling height in the main living space, whose unusual form is emphasized by wood ribs.
One of the highlights of the home is the glass bi-fold doors, which emphasize the L.A. residents' embrace of indoor-outdoor living.
The open-plan living area in a restrained palette of neutrals.
The open floor plan features a whitewashed interior, beamed wood ceilings, splashes of hardwood, and a freestanding vintage fire drum fireplace sourced by Wilson’s wife Coco.
Revised landscaping at the back of the house enhances the indoor/outdoor feel of the home’s original architecture. The rug is from Target and the Mobile Chandelier is from West Elm.
Thanks to passive cooling techniques such as natural ventilation, the House for Hermes does not need air conditioning in the summer.
The most important aspect of designing this home was capturing the views from every angle. By placing the home on stilts, Herbst was able to make the best use of the surroundings.
Light floods into the indoor/outdoor living area.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.