285 Living Room Sofa Medium Hardwood Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
The small window has been replaced with a large glazed door, and the original fireplace has been restored and reinstated.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
In the richly hued living room, a Milo Baughman coffee table with a chrome base and custom marble top pairs with Milo Baughman barrel chairs that have been reupholstered in a saturated blue fabric. A custom velvet sofa adds another textured layer. A custom light fixture with crystal bulbs from The Future Perfect hangs like jewelry above the space, and a geometric painting by senior JHID designer Chelsie Lee ties the colors together.
Skylights throw pink and yellow tones across the 850-square-foot unit’s stepped ceilings. “With small spaces, we try to play with clerestory windows, skylights, and ceilings. It makes the architecture feel spacious, almost as though it’s levitating.”
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
"In our living room, we have a fairly large abstract piece from Sally King Benedict that was gifted from her years ago," says Amanda.
In the living room: the theatrical heavy curtain is made of Grazia and co Feel acoustic drapery. The furnishings are also by Grazia and co and include the HARVEY curved arm sofa, HARVEY armchair and IVY coffee table.
“Small but flexible spaces define the interiors," note the architects. The living room doubles as a music room and elevated stage for the three children (ages 8, 10 and 14) to put on a "home show." The hanging stair serves as a the "perfect 'back of house' grand entrance."
Removing the hallway created room for a cozy family room upstairs. The family is enjoying the nesting process since the remodel was completed in 2017. "We are raising our kid here, learning how to cook, and I even started to do a lot of working from home here even before the pandemic," says Martin. "We hop from one place to the other, making minor changes and making them our favorite for some time. We spent lots of nights here."
The wood flooring is the original 1930 slavonia oak, rescued and refinished.
Now, the kitchen takes precedence in the new scheme. The six-meter-long island "has a strong energy," says Martin. "It was inspired by Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey monolith depicted in the first and final scenes. A fallen monolith with centripetal force. The piece helped us to reorganize and restructure the ground floor once we cleared the walls and divisions."
The cabin entry leads directly to a cozy living room with a fridge, a small live-edge counter, and a bar sink. Picture-frame windows are strategically placed to frame views of distant mountains.
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The living room has a long, built-in couch with a custom midcentury-inspired fireplace. Polished concrete floors in the interior contrast with the outdoor timber decking.
Built-in shelving in the ground-floor living area provides ample storage for books and records. “This is my favourite chair, where I like to sit and watch the fire or read a book,” says the owner.
A hammock chair in the living room overlooks the wood stove at the center and the sofa against the west wall, creating a cozy living space.
The main living area on the ground floor has 20-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan. The high ceilings allow the 395-square-foot home to feel expansive, light, and breezy. In cold weather, the owner grows seedlings by the south-facing windows.
The owner wanted to achieve a simple and rustic aesthetic throughout the home, with a focus on raw materials. “I didn’t want to paint the wood white, for instance,” he says. “I just wanted to let it age naturally and invite it to mirror the natural world it was now a part of.”
“I’ve been looking at cabins and small homes since I was a teenager,” says the owner. “I knew I wanted the home to have a small footprint, but for the interior space to still feel open and expansive.” This informed the interior planning, as he knew he didn’t want the upper floors to completely enclose the ground floor. By minimizing the second floor and including an open third-floor loft bedroom, he was able to maintain a spacious feeling and avoid making the interior spaces feel too enclosed.
The great room is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the back of the space (which is just a slice of the all-glass rear) includes a bi-fold NanaWall door system that opens the home to an outdoor terrace and the lush surroundings.
The mezzanine ladder can fold against the wall to free up circulation space when it is not in use.
Orange was used as a leitmotif that weaves throughout the main level, with furnishings such as the mezzanine ladder, the sofa, and the kitchen tile.
"The angular geometry of the catwalk trusses, the kitchen island, and the bathroom projection together with the 60-degree pitched roof make the project’s geometry performative and visually interesting," says Edgar.
A rendered peek inside a 2X lightHouse model.
The two made a trip down to Ventura just to pick up the Poul Cadovius Royal System shelf, their favorite piece in the house. They also have several prints from illustrator Kyler Martz.
With a budget of £10,400 (approximately $13,000), Intervention Architecture transformed a tiny apartment into a minimalist studio. The firm worked with a cabinetmaker to design a custom unit and centerpiece for the space.
A sofa by Stephen Kenn Studio joins ceramic tables by artist Ben Medansky in the glass-walled living area. The AIM pendants are by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Flos and the Oda floor lamps are from Pulpo. The metal artworks are by Guy.
The ADU is perfect for visiting family and friends.
The private areas of the Stack House are interlaced to create voids for shared living spaces.
A deck opens up to the west from the main living space, and it’s the perfect place to watch the sunset. A long, low window at the rear of the space frames the tree line.
The clients fell in love with the double-sided Cheminees Philippe fireplace, which had been used in a previous Modscape project they had seen. “It works nicely in this home to help subtly define each space, and it’s a stunning feature,” says Modscape managing director Jan Gyrn.
The living spaces are designed to remain clutter-free and open toward the view. Services, including the mudroom, laundry, and family bathroom, are located in a separate wing to the rear of the home.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
Operable windows and doors on the east and west facades allow for effective cross ventilation across the narrow footprint of the home.
Like the second-floor living room, the more private living area in the master bedroom boasts a fireplace and expansive views.
The large master bedroom can also be used as an additional living area by the parents and the children.
The second floor is where all three generations come together to eat, play, work, and gather around the fireplace.
The pitched portion of the roof creates a high ceiling and an airy aesthetic in the living area, where large windows, including two half moon windows, facilitate plenty of sunlight.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
A coat of Dunn Edwards "Frosting Cream" brightens up the surroundings significantly.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
The main living space includes a futon and kitchen area, with a washroom tucked in the corner.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
The living room seamlessly connects with the outdoor terrace. Oiled pine is used for both the indoor flooring and outdoor deck.
As an homage to the original owners and their art collection, Will and Mark commissioned a digital work by Chicago-based artist duo Luftwerk that can be projected onto the large wall in the living area.
The materials used in the house—concrete blocks and oak floors—are modest, and the detailing is very simple and often workmanlike. The white concrete block walls were repainted in Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace during the renovation.
Mark and Will chose to keep the walls largely bare, celebrating the house itself as a piece of art. They furnished the interior by reusing some of their favorite existing pieces—including the Eames Aluminum Group and Florence Knoll lounge chairs—augmented with similar classics and a few special pieces for character.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
Plenty of natural light comes in via the rear glass wall.
A sizable window in the living room frames a view of of the adjacent pine tree forest. A recycled Rimu timber shelf above the window provides additional storage.
A double-sided shelf, made by local craftsman Mark Vibert using recycled native Rimu timber, sections the living area from the kitchen and provides storage.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.