30 Living Room Shelves Storage Recessed Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The built-in timber storage units in the living room feature the same concrete top as the kitchen bench and the desk in the study nook. The rawness of the concrete contrasts with the refined oak timber joinery and minimal white walls.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
The project team excavated a portion of the backyard to create a sunken patio that seamlessly meets the grade of the interior living spaces. The interior flooring is large-scale honed basalt tile (24" x 48" in size), which becomes 24" x 48" flamed basalt tile at the exterior patio.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
The original brick wall is made of a sand-lime mix; in front of it sits a sofa by Robin Day for Habitat. In the study, a Louis De Poortere rug, from a collection inspired by the 1960s, evokes Farnley Hey’s early years. The Yorkstone flooring has been well varnished over time. The seating unit is by Robin Day and the side table is by Oliver Bonas.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
A view of the large, open-plan living space.
The TV nook sits just off the living room. Built-in shelving flanks a cozy fireplace.
Full-height windows provide the living room with lots of natural lighting. A generous fireplace anchors the room.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.
The view from the kitchen.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.
From the open-plan living and dining area to the adjoining bedroom, the owner can enjoy spectacular views of the sea.
The blue cabinets of the kitchen run through into the living area with a softer natural oak top tying the room together. A modular sofa can be moved in different configurations.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
Zoning laws determined the maximum square footage of the guesthouse; as a workaround, Schwartz created a detached two-car garage, which did not count toward the dwelling’s overall size. In addition to the breezeway and the overhang, a series of ipe slats unite the two structures, covering the doors and a walkway in between. The living area is furnished with a Raleigh sofa and armchair by Jeffrey Bernett and Nicholas Dodziuk; the direct-vent gas stove is by Jøtul.
From the 33rd floor, the view of Lake Michigan is expansive. Linen curtains from The Shade Store filter sunlight. Extra lighting is provided by LED ceiling lights, a Tatou F floor lamp by Patricia Urquiola, and a Copycat table lamp by Michael Anastassiades for Flos.
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Chicago, Illinois
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Living Room

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.