36 Living Room Shelves Storage Table Design Photos And Ideas

The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
Fitted with a new black-framed window unit, the new, light-filled living room features a sofa and coffee table from Beitili.
The view from the opposite end, where an additional loft area is used as the children’s bedroom. Plywood ceilings complement the hardwood floors below.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
Different shades of brown can bring a calm, earthy feel to living rooms and studies.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
A cabinetry wall is constructed with marine plywood.
When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.
The cedar-clad interior provides protection from the sun and orients views towards the ocean.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.
White resin was used for the flooring in the living room.
The dining table is the Bonaldo Tracks table, while the dining bench is from IKEA. The window seat provides additional seating.
The blue cabinets of the kitchen run through into the living area with a softer natural oak top tying the room together. A modular sofa can be moved in different configurations.
Unité d'Habitation in Marseille, France
The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs on a platform two meters above the floor. Elevating the bed allows the main living areas and storage to be tucked below.
This structure encloses the interior wall at an axis of 45 degrees on the plane.
The Dining and Living Room

Photo courtesy of Tobias Laarmann
The dark woodwork added to the appreciation of the home's Hudson River views.
The small dining counter with Glenn bar stools.
To create a sense of luxury on a budget, the architect ran a thin concrete border along either side of the fireplace flue and flanked it with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves. The second story has two lofts joined by a steel bridge.
Designer in Brooklyn, New York

"The pieces in the space are a combination of industrial reclaimed finds and bespoke, often both in the same item. The cabinets were a vintage medical find, powder-coated and set up on welded stilts. The mirror was commissioned from Made In Chinatown. Ceiling color and texture came through lots of trial and error in order to avoid the heavily toxic and arduous process normally involved in staining concrete. The mezzanine sign which marks the space was acquired through a long chain of inside jokes from a friend—I'm still unsure exactly of its origins, possibly the bygone New York Subway signage system."
Living Room

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.