64 Living Room Shelves Storage Rug Floors Design Photos And Ideas

2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti. The wood-burning fireplace sits along one wall in the room, with a bright orange flue acting as a sculptural focal point.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
André placed a vintage Hans Wegner chair in the study, next to cabinets and a round rug, both designed by him. The ceiling lamp is from Atelier Oï, and the black vase is from Zwiesel Kristallglas.
The original brick wall is made of a sand-lime mix; in front of it sits a sofa by Robin Day for Habitat. In the study, a Louis De Poortere rug, from a collection inspired by the 1960s, evokes Farnley Hey’s early years. The Yorkstone flooring has been well varnished over time. The seating unit is by Robin Day and the side table is by Oliver Bonas.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
A clear delineation lies between the oak-clad box that houses the entry, kitchen, and bathroom on the right, and the white-walled living room and bedroom.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
A view of the large, open-plan living space.
The TV nook sits just off the living room. Built-in shelving flanks a cozy fireplace.
Beautifully detailed built-ins store home necessities.  A wood-burning fireplace adds a rustic feel to this modern cabin.
Cozy textures like rattan and fur give each apartment complex a homely feel.
The light-filled living area includes a Le Corbusier leather chair and a caned lounge chair. A door on the far wall opens up to a balcony space.
Full-height windows provide the living room with lots of natural lighting. A generous fireplace anchors the room.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.
The interior stonework echoes the exterior, so that it feels as though the structure has been carved from the hillside.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
bbb
The view from the kitchen.
Walnut storage, both open and closed, frames a black-painted wall with a fireplace at its center. The wall treatment can also hide a future television. "A dark wall is a great way to keep a large screen from feeling like a big black hole on the wall," notes the firm.
A Cosmorelax Essex sofa sits in the living area, along with Maxalto Fulgens armchairs.
Large living spaces embody modern comfort.  A stone clad wood-burning fireplace, lush furnishings in rich colors, soft textiles, and custom built-ins create a retreat worth staying in.
Planted with Japanese maples, visitors notice these sunken gardens while walking across glass plank walkways en route to the front door.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
Wilson transformed the interior of this 1974 airstream so it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as a dressing room for Iggy Pop and Beck during the Project Pabst Music Festival in Portland, Oregon.
The living spaces on the ground floor now consist of exposed steelwork with polished concrete, timber surfaces, and large Crittall windows.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
Contemporary materials like concrete and steel are a wonderful contrast to the ancient stone walls.
A vintage Womb Chair was reupholstered with a nubby custom fabric from Cowtan & Tout. The floor lamp is from Atelier de Troupe, and the rug is a vintage Moroccan flatweave.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
A great sense of space occupies the main volume of the home.
Details of the living room.
Subsequently, the home integrates a strong sense of the outdoors throughout.
The home is airy and bright—enveloped in natural lighting thanks to large expanses of glass and clerestory windows.
The spacious living room opens to the dining area which sits off the kitchen.
In the living room, ethereal white curtains soften the severity of the concrete walls.
A Wilhelmina chair by Ilmari Tapiovaara furnishes the living area.
A darker blue hue adds richness to the built in casework in the living space.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.
Continuous clerestory windows provide views out into the surroundings at all edges. The butterfly roof appears to hover atop the structure.
In the second floor lounge, a Flex sleeper sofa in Gravel from CB2 sits opposite an antique Chinese coffee table Flanders inherited from her grandmother.
Zoning laws determined the maximum square footage of the guesthouse; as a workaround, Schwartz created a detached two-car garage, which did not count toward the dwelling’s overall size. In addition to the breezeway and the overhang, a series of ipe slats unite the two structures, covering the doors and a walkway in between. The living area is furnished with a Raleigh sofa and armchair by Jeffrey Bernett and Nicholas Dodziuk; the direct-vent gas stove is by Jøtul.
Plasterboard was used on the walls and ceilings of the interiors to accentuate an abundance of natural light.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.