243 Living Room Shelves Rug Floors Design Photos And Ideas

A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti. The wood-burning fireplace sits along one wall in the room, with a bright orange flue acting as a sculptural focal point.
Rudolph M. Schindler’s Kallis House, recently restored by homeowners Susan Orlean and John Gillespie, is often referred to as the Austrian-born architect’s late-period masterpiece. It makes use of the "Schindler frame," an adaptation that allowed him to design large glazed openings and thin ceilings and roofs. John, Susan, and their dog, Ivy, commune in the sitting area of the master bedroom. The Wide Angle Janus sofa by Edward Wormley for Dunbar Furniture, found by John’s mother at a thrift store with the original orange fabric intact, was purchased for less than $100, including delivery. The coffee table is by Isamu Noguchi and the 9-Light LED pendant is by Sonneman.
The kitchen looks out onto a large dining area and family room. Built-in bookcases flank one side of the space, while the opposite end is capped by expansive windows looking out onto the patio and garden.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
Many of the pieces were designed by Elrod and custom made specifically for the home.
The two simple volumes are intersected by an internal courtyard that maintains visual transparency between the front and back of the home.
Custom-built from the ground up, a 360-square-foot tiny house on wheels is an affordable, off-grid paradise for a family of three in Hawaii.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls invite warm natural light into the 1,664-square-foot interior.
In the living room, tall leaning shelves frame handcrafted artwork. A geometric bronze coffee tables complements the green velvet sectional, which offers plenty of space to gather.
Set on the parlor level of the home is a large and airy library, which can easily be converted into a fifth bedroom. Floor-to-ceiling bookshelves (designed by Pei) stretch across one wall, while bespoke doors on the opposite side hide even more storage.
If they can’t leave a used bookstore without copping at least three paperbacks at $1 apiece, we’ve got a gift for them.
In lieu of a casserole, we propose gifting these colorful toys, soothing balms, and adorable accessories to your family, friends, and acquaintances who are totally ready to rock parenthood—but could maybe use a little help.
“With the separate levels, children and adults have their own territories but can also come together,” explains Clive.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
The sofa is by Petter Skogstad for Cremme.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
André placed a vintage Hans Wegner chair in the study, next to cabinets and a round rug, both designed by him. The ceiling lamp is from Atelier Oï, and the black vase is from Zwiesel Kristallglas.
Rich textured wood paneling lines the living room walls, contrasting nicely against the polished concrete floors.
A leather sofa, brass floor lamp, and wood coffee table in Carter's work studio.
Succulents and cacti fill a sun-drenched nook in the hallway.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
The uninterrupted use of concrete throughout the interior creates a sense of fluidity between spaces.
The original brick wall is made of a sand-lime mix; in front of it sits a sofa by Robin Day for Habitat. In the study, a Louis De Poortere rug, from a collection inspired by the 1960s, evokes Farnley Hey’s early years. The Yorkstone flooring has been well varnished over time. The seating unit is by Robin Day and the side table is by Oliver Bonas.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
A thin wood shelf provides a workspace beside the stove.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
Subtle curves introduced throughout the design, such as in the built-in casework and stone plinth, soften the geometric plan of the home.
The den.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
The "library under the stars" features thousands of old books plucked from antique shops.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
A clear delineation lies between the oak-clad box that houses the entry, kitchen, and bathroom on the right, and the white-walled living room and bedroom.
What began as a stark room with pale-yellow walls and beige carpet is now a plush reading area.
San Francisco–based Michael Hennessey Architecture paid homage to Eichler's affinity for open spaces by reconfiguring the living area on the upper floor and moving the kitchen to organically connect the rooms.
Primary colors and straight lines fuse together in this bold apartment. A Cosmorelax Essex sofa sits in the living area, along with Maxalto Fulgens armchairs.
The light-filled, open-plan living and entertaining spaces feature double-height ceilings and a variety of bespoke built-ins.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
Finding a wheelchair accessible home in New York City can be a challenge, but after a diving accident left David Carmel paralyzed from the waist down, Carmel knew he was looking for a home that was "accessible but not institutional." Working with Della Valle Bernheimer, they made an apartment that is both beautiful and accessible, with a lightweight sliding wall that closes off the bedroom from the living area.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The Apartment boasts textured, vivacious interiors. Here, an Aalto Stool in the Hella Jongerius color edition doubles as a plant stand while Artek Lithographs from Edition Copenhagen by Mamma Anderson hang on the walls. The sculptural candlestick is by Arje Griegst.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
A double-height graffiti wall is bathed in natural light.
The living and dining areas are located in one large, open-plan space—which is typical of Breuer homes.
The architects made sure to use wide windows, so that the view is never far away from the action.
The cozy living room is furnished with a hand-me-down couch with a cover purchased from Amazon. The ottoman is from TJ Maxx. The area rug, side table, and pillows are from Target.
Another cozy reading nook takes advantage of natural light.
A view of the large, open-plan living space.
The TV nook sits just off the living room. Built-in shelving flanks a cozy fireplace.
Beautifully detailed built-ins store home necessities.  A wood-burning fireplace adds a rustic feel to this modern cabin.
The energy-efficient Dickerman Residence by Richard Pedranti Architect boasts warm wood ceilings, midcentury-inspired furnishings, and a stately stone fireplace.
The updated living room is in keeping with the architect's original vision.
The lower level has a long, open living space which extends from the dining area out towards the pool. Here is a view from the living room towards the pool.
Materials enhance this natural connection, reflecting the silvery hues of the overcast sky of the Pacific Northwest and tying the building to the forest floor.
Hope Springs Resort in Palm Springs, California
INT2 architecture used a variety of different materials to delineate spaces throughout Interior KG. The living room features a light wood herringbone parquet and several rows of shelves.
The cozy parlor-floor living room is anchored by a fireplace from the Dutch company Rais.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.