266 Living Room Shelves Rug Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
Living Room
The sitting room is an updated homage to the past that references the home’s history while keeping a distinctly contemporary vibe. "However, she did want to make one room that felt old," explains Yun.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
Contemporary furnishings from Muuto and Matter, as well as vintage pieces by Adrian Pearsall, add splashes of color to the couple’s cat-friendly living room. The Bollo chair is by Andreas Engesvik and Fogia and the Flowerfield pouf is by Baum und Pferdgarten from Common Seating. The custom ottoman and media cabinet are by Studio Natio, while the Flotation chandelier is by Ingo Maurer.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
"I try to make use of storage as much as possible to keep my home clutter-free," Keri says. "Clutter tends to make us feel stressed—our cortisol levels go up and our heart rate increases—whether we realize it or not." She uses the built-ins along the living and dining spaces of her home, and creates "designated areas" for things like exercise equipment. A West Elm sectional is accompanied by side tables and a chair from Blu Dot.
Like all of the restored structures, the interior of the school house features a modern and bright aesthetic. The cottages range in size from one bedroom up to a nine-bedroom main house.
A large OSB structure with skylights, a bathroom, an enclosed baby’s room, and a master sleeping alcove dominates Ryan and Showalter’s Brooklyn loft.
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
A three-seater Ella sofa and footrest in Vega Anthracit by Sofacompany anchor the living room. The steel coffee table is by Lim and the rug is from Coral & Hive. The shelving and cabinets are custom from Holz Cabinetry. The lamp is from Vamp and the lampshade is from Skinny laMinx. The chairs are from Chair Crazy and the television is from Samsung.
Having spent more time at home in recent months, Nina and her family are truly experiencing the "essence" of her design, she says. Their library corner, a space that was once underused, has become a place of respite for the family where they can gather on the Nanimarquina Rangoli rug and listen to records.
Clever arrangements of furniture delineate the spaces in the loft’s open floor plan. In the living area, a hand-knitted Donna Wilson Motley ottoman sits opposite a B&B Italia Charles sofa and Arco lamp.
Built-in shelving in the ground-floor living area provides ample storage for books and records. “This is my favourite chair, where I like to sit and watch the fire or read a book,” says the owner.
The main living area on the ground floor has 20-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan. The high ceilings allow the 395-square-foot home to feel expansive, light, and breezy. In cold weather, the owner grows seedlings by the south-facing windows.
The living room is outfitted with a Joybird sofa, a wool rug from Eclectic Goods, and a selection of musical instruments. "I've been playing music my entire life, and having musical instruments in my home was super important to me," she says. "People might think it's crazy to put a drum set in a tiny home, but it makes me happy, and I designed the house with every intention of making room for all of it."
Astrain updated the fireplace with a Carrara marble Victorian fireplace surround from The Architectural Forum.
2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
The first step was to tear out the existing wall-to-wall carpeting and replace it with cabin-grade, oak flooring to give the house a classic feel and to help anchor the more modern walls and trim. They ordered the flooring from a large company and despite it being the cheapest option offered, the total expense came to $2,300 for materials, making the wood floors—according to Anderson—their biggest splurge.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti. The wood-burning fireplace sits along one wall in the room, with a bright orange flue acting as a sculptural focal point.
Rudolph M. Schindler’s Kallis House, recently restored by homeowners Susan Orlean and John Gillespie, is often referred to as the Austrian-born architect’s late-period masterpiece. It makes use of the "Schindler frame," an adaptation that allowed him to design large glazed openings and thin ceilings and roofs. John, Susan, and their dog, Ivy, commune in the sitting area of the master bedroom. The Wide Angle Janus sofa by Edward Wormley for Dunbar Furniture, found by John’s mother at a thrift store with the original orange fabric intact, was purchased for less than $100, including delivery. The coffee table is by Isamu Noguchi and the 9-Light LED pendant is by Sonneman.
Living room with low built in units maximises sense of height to new living space, while shelves provide ample spaces to display client's wonderful collection of African artefacts
The kitchen looks out onto a large dining area and family room. Built-in bookcases flank one side of the space, while the opposite end is capped by expansive windows looking out onto the patio and garden.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
Many of the pieces were designed by Elrod and custom made specifically for the home.
The two simple volumes are intersected by an internal courtyard that maintains visual transparency between the front and back of the home.
Custom-built from the ground up, a 360-square-foot tiny house on wheels is an affordable, off-grid paradise for a family of three in Hawaii.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls invite warm natural light into the 1,664-square-foot interior.
In the living room, tall leaning shelves frame handcrafted artwork. A geometric bronze coffee tables complements the green velvet sectional, which offers plenty of space to gather.
Set on the parlor level of the home is a large and airy library, which can easily be converted into a fifth bedroom. Floor-to-ceiling bookshelves (designed by Pei) stretch across one wall, while bespoke doors on the opposite side hide even more storage.
If they can’t leave a used bookstore without copping at least three paperbacks at $1 apiece, we’ve got a gift for them.
In lieu of a casserole, we propose gifting these colorful toys, soothing balms, and adorable accessories to your family, friends, and acquaintances who are totally ready to rock parenthood—but could maybe use a little help.
“With the separate levels, children and adults have their own territories but can also come together,” explains Clive.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
The sofa is by Petter Skogstad for Cremme.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
André placed a vintage Hans Wegner chair in the study, next to cabinets and a round rug, both designed by him. The ceiling lamp is from Atelier Oï, and the black vase is from Zwiesel Kristallglas.
Rich textured wood paneling lines the living room walls, contrasting nicely against the polished concrete floors.
A leather sofa, brass floor lamp, and wood coffee table in Carter's work studio.
Succulents and cacti fill a sun-drenched nook in the hallway.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
The uninterrupted use of concrete throughout the interior creates a sense of fluidity between spaces.
The original brick wall is made of a sand-lime mix; in front of it sits a sofa by Robin Day for Habitat. In the study, a Louis De Poortere rug, from a collection inspired by the 1960s, evokes Farnley Hey’s early years. The Yorkstone flooring has been well varnished over time. The seating unit is by Robin Day and the side table is by Oliver Bonas.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
A thin wood shelf provides a workspace beside the stove.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
Subtle curves introduced throughout the design, such as in the built-in casework and stone plinth, soften the geometric plan of the home.
The den.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
The "library under the stars" features thousands of old books plucked from antique shops.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
A clear delineation lies between the oak-clad box that houses the entry, kitchen, and bathroom on the right, and the white-walled living room and bedroom.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.