44 Living Room Sectional Storage Rug Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Living Room
In this sprawling ranch, every guest will have an individual experience. Each of the three bedrooms have been decorated with period furnishings and have a different theme. For a communal experience, cook together in the modern kitchen with quality appliances.
"The clients really didn't want the TV to be the main feature of the living room, so we designed the piece with sliding panels to give the flexibility to hide the TV and reveal a bookshelf in the closed position," explains Peake.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
The TV nook sits just off the living room. Built-in shelving flanks a cozy fireplace.
Beautifully detailed built-ins store home necessities.  A wood-burning fireplace adds a rustic feel to this modern cabin.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
The light-filled living area includes a Le Corbusier leather chair and a caned lounge chair. A door on the far wall opens up to a balcony space.
The airy living room shows off a monochrome landscape by Petros Koublis framed by an Interior Define sectional and Verellen coffee table. Extra accents include a floor lamp by Bungalow Decor in Westport, block print pillows by Susan Connor, aerrain plant pot, and black urns by Habitat Greenwich. Tying the space together is a rug from Restoration Hardware.
The row of storage continues into the living area. The sofa and ceramic coffee table are both from French designer Christophe Delcourt. The gray wall lamp is from Le Corbusier and the paper lantern is by Isamu Noguchi.
An L-shaped couch delineates the TV lounge room.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
The view from the kitchen.
The living room sports a panoply of wood: Douglas fir for the ceiling, hemlock for the walls, and stained oak for the floor. The sofa is the Neo model by Bensen and the rug is vintage.
Walnut storage, both open and closed, frames a black-painted wall with a fireplace at its center. The wall treatment can also hide a future television. "A dark wall is a great way to keep a large screen from feeling like a big black hole on the wall," notes the firm.
Large living spaces embody modern comfort.  A stone clad wood-burning fireplace, lush furnishings in rich colors, soft textiles, and custom built-ins create a retreat worth staying in.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
The ground floor consists of a large living room, dining area, and kitchen.
Contemporary materials like concrete and steel are a wonderful contrast to the ancient stone walls.
The living area now feels open and bright and showcases the couple’s appreciation for furniture design and artwork. The family opted for a Camber sectional and rug from Design Within Reach, coffee table from Steven Alan Home, and replica Eames Lounge to outfit the space.
Inside the unit, Robb (Robb Studio) and Bishop (Studio Gild) inherited several attractive features: 14-foot ceilings, exposed concrete, and a fireplace set within the original chimney stack of the building. The primary goals included making the kitchen more prominent within the home— it was moved forward to engage more acutely with the dining and living room spaces—and to properly showcase the client’s art collection (much of which, including an eight-panel painting by Matt Mullican that stretches across nearly an entire wall).Add a caption
All furnishings were purchased on a budget. The rug and Friheten sleeper sectional in the living room, the Luftig oven hood, Norrsjön sink, Sektion cabinetry, and countertop in the kitchen, and the small dining counter with Glenn bar stools were all sourced from IKEA.
The original home occupies a prominent hilltop overlooking Silicon Valley and faces into the pristine rolling hills of a nature preserve at the end of the house receiving the new addition. Taking cues from dominant natural elements of the surrounding densely wooded hillside – boulders, bark, and leaves – SaA created a two-story addition with the visual weight needed to anchor the long axis of the extended original house. Against this, the architects balanced steel-framed stair treads and awnings that cantilever from minimal structural supports as if leaves from a slender branch.
Original tongue-and-groove pine boards, restained a warm chestnut hue, run horizontally to the ceiling. The residents layered gray sheepskin rugs on top of wool berber carpeting, installed by Joseph Velletri’s Sons.
Remodeled by resident and interior decorator Jill McCoy and her husband David Hassall with the help of architect Paul Molina, the open-plan living space opens to a small outdoor area. French doors and a wall of windows bring in light. An Eames lounge chair and a Noguchi table add a modern sensibility.
The house is like an anthology of modern design, spread out across 4,300 square feet. In the formal living room alone, there’s a Japan chair by Finn Juhl, a Hang-It-All rack by Charles and Ray Eames, a Scissor chair by Pierre Jeanneret, a Wiggle stool by Frank Gehry, and an Akari lamp by Isamu Noguchi. George began his collection in the 1990s with a pair of Paul McCobb stools, which sit near the fireplace.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.