142 Living Room Lamps Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
A look at the living room in the Callister-designed structure. The large room offers built-in seating, as well as custom shutters and paneling along the ceiling.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
A band of clerestory windows runs along the south side of the garden room. Sliding glass doors separate the space from a formal dining area.
The star of the home is a two-story garden room. A wall of floor-to-ceiling windows ushers sunlight into the voluminous space, from which several other living areas branch off.
For this Eichler remodel, the objective was to respect the original bones with more thoughtful updates than what had come before. "Our goal was to design a beautiful mix of finishes that respected the timeless design intention of Eichler homes," say Sommer and Costello. "Rather than focus purely on historical renovation, we wanted to update the finishes and layout to ensure it lives on for the next generation."
Living Room
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
Walls of windows usher in an abundance of light throughout the home's spacious, open layout.
Italian designer Renzo Mongiardino revamped the 269-year-old property in the 1980s, enhancing the home's neoclassical and Middle Eastern design detailing.
Upon arrival, a box-stepped doorway leads into one of the home’s living areas, where colorful artwork contrasts with various original detailing, such as ornate, wrought-iron fixtures.
The living room boasts a bright blue epoxy “rug” and tables fashioned from logs.
The Country French style is more apparent in the family room, which features a cathedral ceiling strapped with wooden beams. Natural light seeps into the space from large windows and doors along both sides of the room, as well as dormer windows along the ceiling.
Wall-length windows and 18-to-32-foot-high ceilings effortlessly capture views of the city's skyline, while also ushering in an abundance of natural light.
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
The exterior materials are carried inside to a slatted entryway that conceals a utility unit and closet.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
On the home’s lower level, an open bedroom area includes a Sierra chair by Croft House and a Nelson Bubble Cigar pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller.
A multi-use podium runs the length of the wall under the windows and facilitates impromptu performances for the creative family that lives here.
Living Area
Living Area
The former gallery was enclosed in order to create space for two guest bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs. An elevated walkway stretches over the former nave and leads to a master suite opposite, separated from the other bedrooms for privacy.
The view from the tiled bedroom/bathroom cube. The Alta Lounge Chair, with its swooping lacquered wood base, was designed by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer and his daughter in 1971. Nildo José designed the marble coffee table, as well as the pair of concrete coffee tables.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
In the sitting area next to the bedroom wing, the exterior panels take the form of interior bookshelves. Framed with glass above, below, and between, the shelves allow nature to peek through.
The couple purchased the living room’s H.W. Klein chairs with the house. Another existing piece was the mezzanine’s daybed, designed by Peter Hvidt and Orlando Mølgaard Nielsen. An original floating staircase leads to the mezzanine and then up to the second floor. The open, straight-forward spaces speak to one of Christian’s guiding principles: “Simplicity is the key,” he says.
Manhattan Daybed by Guy Rogers.
In the study, an Anglepoise lamp complements the custom drapes by Moon Fabrics.
The living area—or “dance floor,” as the Womersley family called it—has an expansive feel, thanks to high ceilings and full-length windows.
Oiled oak was used for the cladding of the walls, ceiling, floor, and built-in furniture. The gabled windows and expansive glazing allow natural light to flood throughout.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
The former dining room was converted into a sitting nook just off the living room, which the family now affectionately refers to as the "parlor.
The entryway greets visitors with cedar-paneled ceilings and a strong midcentury vibe.
An asymmetrical stone fireplace is a dramatic focal point in the open plan.
The living room fully opens and extends to the terrace, allowing for indoor/outdoor living.
Pictured is the largest of the units, the "not-so-tiny home." Its two bedrooms anchor each end of the home, offering privacy. The homes feature 9-foot ceilings, and this unit can accommodate a king-sized bed.
The brick used in construction of the social structure were taken from a deconstructed factory once belonging to the homeowners.
The interior of the social side of the home was made to feel like a communal pavilion, with all of the activities grouped in one fluid space and clerestory windows invoking an open-air aspect.
Berk melds inky tones with organic elements for a modern yet warm aesthetic.
The living room is chic and polished, but still exudes a masculine vibe.
The expansive wall of glass is broken by the wood-burning brick fireplace.
The home's post-and-beam construction leads the eye straight from the central atrium to the backyard on the opposite side.
In the living room, a Croft House sofa cozies up to a Casamidy coffee table and leather-wrapped Remnant Stools from Cuffhome.
The open-plan living area features soaring, vaulted ceilings thanks to the double A-frame design.
The apartments feature the Scent to Sleep range by London-based fragrance company Neom. The fragrance is a blend of 19 essential oils—including English lavender, sweet basil and jasmine—designed to help guests drift off.
The living room in the penthouse opens to a sunlit terrace.
The luminous living room of the “George Washington House” features a soaring, beamed ceiling and extensive glazing.
cozy by the fire
Inside, the angled sweep of the roofline and clerestory windows let in lots of desert light.
A renovation of one of Sea Ranch's homes was completed over the course of four years by Butler Armsden Architects and Leverone Design; their design employed similar materials and aesthetics as the original.
Under the Roof by FLCA
Designed for indoor/outdoor living, the large open-plan great room is central to the home's layout. It features a stone fireplace and full-height sliding doors which open to the outdoor pool area.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.