164 Living Room Lamps Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The overlapping roofs rest on structural timber window frames, allowing for column-free views through the interior.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The rumpus room on the lowest level opens out to the pool deck and features a Boyd floor lamp from Australian brand Jardan, and a Nebula Nine sofa by Diesel Creative Team for Moroso.
Woelfel sees coastal blues becoming prevalent in bedrooms, either on walls or as part of the furnishings.
The Bracy Cottage — Living Room
The Bracy Cottage — Living Room
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
Natural light flows through both a triangular clerestory window and floor-to-ceiling glass doors.
The ground-floor living room features a low bench adorned with objets d’art that runs beneath a window that frames views of the surrounding trees.
Large sliding glass doors between the living room and covered porch can be opened or closed as needed, depending on the weather.
The kitchen and living area leads to a traditional porch that connects to the second volume, which contains the private spaces. “We have broken up the distinction between interior and exterior spaces by using a central porch, which functions as a living area and opens up the entire home to the surroundings,” says architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The living room is located on the second level, where large openings provide natural light and ventilation for the interior.
Designer Esther Bruzkus embraced bold color and texture in her Berlin apartment, leaving the window coverings to play a more subtle role.
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
Timber has been used for both internal and external cladding, joinery, furniture, and door handles throughout the home. The entry nook features built-in display storage with brass detailing, which is echoed in the kitchen counter.
“We had a child and made a commitment to take care of my mother. We had to figure out a solution for housing us all with the right privacy and comfort,” says Ilga Paskovskis, owner of the Granny Pad.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
Erin and Tyler went through a three-month-long interview and application process to land their live/work space in the Emeryville Artists Co-op. A hand-painted mural by Erin peeks out from the stairs leading down to the laundry room.
Removing the partition wall makes it so the entire living space benefits from the natural light that comes through the floor-to-ceiling glass in the living room, increasing the sense of indoor-outdoor flow throughout. A sofa from Article is joined by art from Lynne Millar for Juniper Print Shop and a vintage credenza.
“The clients’ main priorities in their lives consisted of: their kids, their friends, their food,” says the firm. “We knew we had to knock down the wall that separated the kitchen from the living room to create one big, open space - this immediately created ease of flow.”
The Floyd sofa was chosen to jive with the family’s vintage painting, called the “Jazz Musician.”
The team kept one wall of paneling to accent the new space.
Sparse built-in furnishings allow the spaces to be easily reconfigured for different functions. Within the first two years of living here, the owners have used the private courts as bedrooms, home offices, storage, and even as workshops for producing candles and soap for sale.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The timber screens outside can be rolled back and forth to control sun exposure, views, and privacy.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
The field of neuroaesthetics teaches us about our biological responses to beautiful design. The thoughtful homes below showcase how lighting, colors, textures, and shapes can coalesce to become bona fide sanctuaries. Whether it be a focus on outdoor connection, aging-in-place, or accessibility, these projects are designed to promote wellness in mind and body.
The gaps in the slabs formed by the U-shaped pieces are filled with clerestory windows that add to the natural light. Here, the lounge is by BoConcept and the table is by Estudio Diario.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
A semi-private sitting room in the entrance block offers a cozier space to relax in compared to the expansive main living room.
A large, open living room seamlessly flows from the kitchen.
Maria Milans del Bosch’s Catskills home is attuned to the changing seasons. Sunlight pours into the double-height living room, where a Stûv fireplace and radiant floors keep the space warm in winter.
Douglas fir beams, some of which were salvaged from the original home that sat on the property, run in perpendicular lines overhead. Certain sections of the ceiling are exposed, while others are covered in drywall. For flooring, the residents, who have two young children, selected durable polished concrete. The Sven Charme sofa is by Article and the teak bureau is vintage.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
A view down from the loft into the expansive space. Rafters and joists frame the pitched roof, while built-in cabinetry runs down both sides of the open living and dining room.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
Floor-to-ceiling glass in the living room makes it feel as though the room merges with the natural setting.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
The exterior materials are carried inside to a slatted entryway that conceals a utility unit and closet.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
On the home’s lower level, an open bedroom area includes a Sierra chair by Croft House and a Nelson Bubble Cigar pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller.
Once barrels were manufactured here for a London brewery. Now a bright, modern home exists, transformed by Chris Dyson Architects. The basement was expanded, and the mezzanine floor removed to create a triple-height living space. A living wall designed by Scotscape in the dining area, roof terrace, and outdoor shower connect tenants to the outdoors.
A multi-use podium runs the length of the wall under the windows and facilitates impromptu performances for the creative family that lives here.
A mezzanine loft level provides extra floor space without increasing the home's footprint. Built-in bookshelves double as a guardrail for the lofted work space, accessed by a built-in ladder.
All of the window glass needed to be replaced, but the lancet-style at the top retains the building’s character, while the bottom sill was dropped down several feet. The blue velvet couch is from Maison Corbeil.
A two-sided fireplace cozies up the living room and dining room. The vintage, blue-and-white couch was refurbished by Paul Tetreault & Fils.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.