332 Living Room End Tables Floor Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Main living space
The rumpus room on the lowest level opens out to the pool deck and features a Boyd floor lamp from Australian brand Jardan, and a Nebula Nine sofa by Diesel Creative Team for Moroso.
A Deep Thoughts Chaise by Blu Dot occupies a sunny spot by the new windows. The firm chose leather for its durability with regards to the owners’ two cats.
The firm furnished the home on a modest budget.
Ben used pine center match boards for the interior flooring which has a very distinct continuous groove pattern that leads the eye to the outdoor deck.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The artwork in the first-floor living room is by contemporary figurative artist Kathrin Longhurst. Colorful pieces, such as the artwork and furniture, bring a sense of vibrancy into the otherwise minimal home.
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
Alex painted the wall behind the mahogany built-in unit the color Messenger Bag by Sherwin Williams, a green that echoes the foliage outside. The concrete side tables are from the Kreten Series by Souda.
Black leather West Elm sofas anchor the room atop a gridded Annie Selke rug.
Zachary wrapped the den in moody Limerence wallpaper from House of Hackney.
Master Bedroom Entrance from Open Living Space
In Austin’s coveted Bouldin Creek neighborhood, Rhode Partners has converted a Mission Revival–style church into four two-story, loft-style homes that enjoy 15-foot ceilings and historic details.
The rear garden, visible from this living court, includes a vegetable patch, fruit trees, and lawn for plenty of play area.
The dining room, living room, kitchen, and playroom all flow into one another.
The home's small footprint inspired Hendricks to choose a minimal paint palette featuring two shades of Farrow & ball white used throughout the first floor. A mix of midcentury pieces sourced from local antique shops sits against a canvas of custom linen curtains. A Brazilian leather sofa adds a sumptuous touch, and the rosewood chairs are upholstered in a serene, olive-green fabric.
Washi tape is widely available online. It can be used in varying depths and colors to create a bold, graphic scheme on walls. "Here we have added layers to create a fresh take on a Scandi-industrial vibe for this family home in London,
The windows are by Albertini—and “Albertini's grandson himself came to look at them,” Faulkner says. The living room has a Stem Floor arching lamp, a Catellani & Smith lamp, the owner’s coffee table, and colorful artwork.
This cozy lounge area captures golden hour sunlight. It features a custom-designed daybed and a Carlo Mollino floor lamp.
Deep clean the house. Dust from top to bottom, clean out shower heads and faucets with vinegar, make your own cleaning agents, mop and polish hardwood floors, and shake out rugs.

Your aquarium needs attention. Scrubbing the fish tank is one of those chores that gets short shrift, so here’s your chance to add it to the list. Finally, you’ll see the goldfish smiling back at you.

Get an emergency kit together. Get supplies ready and establish a plan for the whole family in the event that things get serious.
Maison Gauthier was intended to serve as a permanent family home rather than as a simple summer residence, and it adopts a more substantial sense of scale and materiality. The residence was designed for Jean Prouvé’s own daughter, Françoise—who was married to a doctor—and her young family. The site near Saint-Dié is to the southeast of the city of Nancy, where Prouvé had built his own family home some years earlier. The single-level home perches on the side of a hill, looking towards the town. It features walls made of insulated aluminum panels sitting on concrete foundations, along with horizontal strip windows around the bedrooms at one end of the building and more extensive glazing around the living area at the other.
Inside the Dowell Residence, a key element of the dwelling is its central atrium—a dramatic space, top-lit by clerestory windows, which doubles as a circulation hub and light well while also forming a focal point over both levels of the building.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
Red Hook’s proximity to the water is reflected in the living room’s "sea vibe."
A 15-foot-tall vaulted ceiling, a  clerestory, and a large sliding glass door flood the open-plan living area with plenty of sunlight.
A stepped drywall ceiling lends texture and interest on the interior. The open-plan public space, which includes the kitchen, dining area, and living room, is sectioned by a pair of box-like volumes that contain the two bathrooms; the two bedrooms are located at the rear of the house.
After: The Living Room
After: Spacious Living Room
After: Now, the windows are artfully highlighted with black paint.
A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti. The wood-burning fireplace sits along one wall in the room, with a bright orange flue acting as a sculptural focal point.
A look at one of two bedrooms located in the loft area. Windows frame views of the surrounding landscape and brighten the space with the warmth of natural lighting.
A view down from the loft into the expansive space. Rafters and joists frame the pitched roof, while built-in cabinetry runs down both sides of the open living and dining room.
An Italian architecture studio took advantage of an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood. While its exterior offers a smoother, stuccoed appearance, its interiors give way to a juxtaposition of two different concrete applications, opting for a rougher, board-formed treatment on the walls and a quartz paste polish on the floors. Wood accents, by way of the trimwork, doors, and cabinetry, provide rich, striking counterpoints.
An ingenious small-space solution turns a wall into a sitting area.
The star of the home is a two-story garden room. A wall of floor-to-ceiling windows ushers sunlight into the voluminous space, from which several other living areas branch off.
Wei painted the brick hearth to reduce the visual clutter and create a calm backdrop.
All of the home's signature windows and doors are still intact, as is the rich original Birch paneling and post-and-beam construction. An atypical VCT tile lines the interior flooring.
Built in 1955, the Koerner House was designed by renowned architect E. Stewart Williams, whose distinct midcentury modern style significantly shaped the Coachella Valley’s architectural landscape. Interiors feature Williams’ iconic architectural details, including natural teak wood paneling; built-in cabinetry, credenzas, and vanities; wood ceilings; slump stone walls and fireplace; clerestory windows; board-and-batten redwood siding; and original fixtures. The kitchen has been updated and renovated with modern appliances and stone countertops, but retains its original cabinetry.
Another view of the home's extensive vaulted ceilings. An archway houses the main staircase, which leads to the second level and is gracefully lit by original stained glass.
A velvet, orange sectional pairs with a plush, handwoven rug in the 900-square-foot Alexander Suite, which also features black oak and a grand terrace.
Midcentury completists score the ultimate catch: a 1959 post-and-beam fixer-upper in which to showcase their sprawling collection.
With the renovation finished a few months ago, the young family is finally ready to enjoy their home.
In the living room, Fred sits beneath Tom Wesselmann’s Claire’s Valentine Banner, from 1973. A George Nelson Yellow Marshmallow sofa from 1956 joins a Darrell Landrum coffee table, also from the 1950s, and a pair of Verner Panton Cone chairs.
In the sitting room, more pieces from the couple’s collection—a red George Nelson Coconut lounge chair and a blue Adrian Pearsall chaise rocker, to name just two—share space with a pair of Alex Katz screen prints.
A subtly curved staircase leads from the neutral-hued living room to the kitchen.
Strategically placed windows allow ample natural light to illuminate the single-story interior.
The penthouse guest suite features breathtaking views and minimal furnishings.
Cara Anderson's home abounds with natural materials including wood, stone, steel, and of course, plants.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.