103 Living Room Coffee Tables Track Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

While Serboli preserved some period elements—namely the bedroom doors and floors—the living room floors could not be fully salvaged, largely due to the removal of several partitions. As such, the new floor is a continuous slab of ivory-colored micro-cement. The cozy living room features a Mags sofa and CAN chair, both by HAY, and a ZigZag stool from Kettal.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
The light-filled living area includes a Le Corbusier leather chair and a caned lounge chair. A door on the far wall opens up to a balcony space.
Full-height windows provide the living room with lots of natural lighting. A generous fireplace anchors the room.
The “Wild Days” space is defined by a black painted ceiling and a massive custom mosaic.
The view of the lake from the living area.
After discovering their client's love for the ritual of making campfires, the team behind Scott | Edward Architecture created a double-sided, concrete fireplace, which essentially separates the public and private spaces of the home.
"They wanted a very practical house, with separate zones for kids and adults," said Taugbøl. "Because of the split levels, the experience of the space varies when you walk through it," and ascend the staircase. "The acoustics are also great due to the wood paneling in the ceiling." The Raimond pendent lights are from moooi, and the fireplace seating is IKEA.
The brown leather couch is low enough to allow lots of light to filter into the room, but it also has a masculine edge and modern, clean lines.
The loft features high ceilings and tall windows that provide lots of daylight. Charette selected and arranged furniture to complement these features.
The design consists of pieces with a masculine edge in neutral tones, with focused pops of color inspired by views out the windows of nearby buildings.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
The living room features light wood herringbone parquet.
The light-filled living room, with its view of the Manhattan Bridge, gets extra wattage from an Anglepoise Giant lamp. A pair  of Talma armchairs by Moroso face  a walnut coffee table designed  by Dash Marshall and constructed  by Harlem Built. The daybed  was also fabricated by Harlem Built, from a drawing by Rachel.
The soaring vaulted ceiling and the spirit of the living room were preserved, and the entire lower level was enhanced by opening up the space, creating a smooth flow from the living room into the kitchen and dining areas.
In legendary designer Jens Risom's home, the painted white brick fireplace is flanked by wood bookshelves that join to form a mantle.
This angle shows the open-plan layout, as well as the living space that blends into the dining area. The exposed wood tongue-in-groove ceilings have been preserved, while additional lighting has been added.
Built at the end of the 19th century, 411 Vanderbilt Avenue is a brick carriage houses that originally sheltered the horses and coachmen for an upscale estate on Clinton Avenue. The luminous living room features built-in shelving, custom cabinetry, and a gas fireplace with a customized wood mantel by Fitzhugh Karol further enhance the interiors.
The bastion wall has been incorporated into the lobby's design.
During the renovation, Pawson and Gill added an entirely new building to the former hospital and convent. In the new structure, Pawson has created a modernist lobby, highlighting remnants of a 13th-century Crusader’s bastion wall that was uncovered during the excavation.
Lined with new terrazzo flooring edged with blue tile, the open-plan living room is anchored by a corner gas fireplace.
A look at the wood-burning fireplace in the living lounge.
The living and dining areas have been relocated closer to the fully glazed exterior walls, where they can now enjoy more light.
For added flexibility, the designers have inserted a rotating table that can pivot outward to accommodate larger gatherings.
The open-plan living room features expanses of glass, integrating the lush surroundings into the bright and airy space.
In the living room, a burned spruce ceiling—inspired by shou sugi ban, the Japanese technique of charring cedar—contrasts with rendered concrete walls and a polished white concrete floor divided into rectangles by thin brass insets. A Toot sofa by Piero Lissoni for Cassina is paired with Mad Queen armchairs by Marcel Wanders for Poliform and Pebble coffee tables by Air Division for Ligne Roset. The antique rug was bought at the Casablanca souk.
“Stone, timber, heaviness, masculinity were definitely very big a few years ago, but now it’s becoming more feminine, intricate, and delicate as far as architecture,” explains architect Jamie Daugaard.
Flagstone flooring flows between the open living spaces. A stone fireplace anchors the main living space, while cedar wood decking extends between spaces above. A blue entry partition adds a pop of modern color.
The open living/dining/kitchen area features a wall of glass, post-and-beam vaulted ceilings, Eichler's signature brick fireplace, as well as radiant floor heating throughout.
In this view of the living room, the landscaped courtyard is visible. "External spaces become an extension of living zones, maximizing the usable area of the site and contributing to the sense of generosity of space," the architects explain.
The extensive glass walls are composed of sliding panels in order to create complete indoor/outdoor flow with the courtyards on either side. "The two main courtyards are oriented to maximize morning sunlight into the home and permit cross ventilation," note the architects.
The glass addition wraps a tiled courtyard with a slim lap pool that is bordered on the other side with another landscaped courtyard.
The beamed ceiling is sheathed in fir.
Concrete, which reflects the color of the surrounding dunes, serves as a coherent binding material that connects all the interior spaces.
Wooden ceilings ground some of the home's more industrial features in its organic setting.
Golden light floods through the Clerestory windows in the living area, accenting the wooden coffee table from Restoration Hardware and the weathered antique bench the couple scored from Robins Egg Bleu in Winthrop, WA.
In the living area, Lou sits on a Room & Board sofa, while one of the family’s two Great Danes relaxes nearby; the fireplace is by Montigo.
The Yang sectional and Dibbets rug are both from Minotti; the coffee tables are by  Eric Freyer.
The eco-friendly home is equipped with rainwater harvesting, hydronic heating, and a compost and vegetable garden.
Sustainable features include locally and sustainably harvested Victorian hardwood with low VOC finishes and formaldehyde-free plywood.
The owners asked for new common spaces with improved connectivity to the back garden and swimming pool.
WARC Studio founder Andrew Wilson came up with a design solution that would open up the interiors to the garden and pool, but still protect the home from the harsh afternoon sun from the west.
The den, located above the living room, connects to an at-grade fire pit terrace to the south, as well as an elevated deck with views of the lake to the north.
The architects created a new entrance for the home which leads directly into the new addition.
Visitors to the house are greeted by an art-filled living room anchored by a B&B Italia Charles sofa and a pair of vintage Hans Wegner CH22 chairs. Track lighting from WAC Lighting Co. helps showcase individual pieces from the couple’s collection. “My favorite thing is walking in the front door,” Tetreault says.
A tree-stump end table adds a dose of organic style to the modern living area.
014.CASA PEX
The home exemplifies the indoor-outdoor lifestyle of Southern California.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
A completely glazed inner courtyard ensures that the home is flooded with light.
The interior are a flawless visual study of vertical and horizontal forms and many rooms feature Redwood ceilings.
Layered concrete walls and ceilings add a raw masculinity to the interiors.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.