430 Living Room Coffee Tables Wood Burning Fireplace Design Photos And Ideas

A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti. The wood-burning fireplace sits along one wall in the room, with a bright orange flue acting as a sculptural focal point.
When comedian Adam Carolla purchased his midcentury home three years ago, he did so with the intention of doing major renovations on the 1963 gem. His renovations included a complete revamp of the kitchen, new terrazzo and hardwood flooring, and a gut-renovated master suite.
The sitting room features a central fireplace framed by marble and warm wood, a wall of glass, and the original terrazzo floors.
“I love the subtle design of the two fireplaces and I think my favorite part is the way light and shadow play off each other throughout the house,” says listing agent Chris Menrad.
A macramé wall hanging serves as large-scale, textural artwork in this sitting room.
The living room features a Cheminee Philippe wood-burning fireplace, which has a large heating capacity. By placing it below the void, it is able to heat both the downstairs and common areas upstairs.
This full-height bay window juts out of the home, allowing one to “step into” the desert scenery. Poles supporting the ramada pierce down into the living spaces, establishing a continuous connection between the two structures.
On the opposite side of the entry hall is the living room. A double fronted log burner sits within the stone chimney at the center of the space.
Lassen designed all the furniture with the exception of a few items, like the vintage Chairman armchair by Henrik Tengler and white IKEA sofas. “To keep it simple, we only used natural colors from wood inside, with everything else being white,” Lassen says.
Brit and Daniel embraced elements that were original to the A-frame—like the wood stove.
Yellow—one of Elrod's favorite accent colors—plays throughout the home.
Many of the pieces were designed by Elrod and custom made specifically for the home.
The home comes complete with all the original Elrod furnishings and art—including this massive carpet by V’Soske.
In the cozy family room, assorted lanterns hang from the painted brick fireplace. French doors provide direct access to the backyard.
When a couple approached Colorado-based Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects for a modern mountain retreat, they brought with them images of what would be the founding inspiration behind the new design—a simple and rugged cabin in Norway where the husband and his relatives had been gathering since the 1950s. Much like this ancestral Norwegian cabin, the new getaway is designed with the same rustic charms and deference to the landscape, as well as an inviting environment for friends and family to gather for generations to come.
The living space has been painted white and has a bright and airy feel.
The open-plan living space is anchored by a classic stone-inlay, wood-burning fireplace. Large sliding glass doors lead out to the backyard pool area and make for easy indoor/outdoor living and entertaining.
Wei painted the brick hearth to reduce the visual clutter and create a calm backdrop.
Fortunately, the damaged exterior and dismally dark 1970s interior didn’t scare away NMT Financial, who were captivated by the home wrapped around a massive oak tree embedded into the inner courtyard. Oakland-based See Arch was hired to restore the home’s modernist character while updating the dwelling to contemporary standards.
"It’s actually a beautiful love story," says Stinessen. "These two people met at a grown-up age, each having their own children, and live on opposite sides of the country—Frode lives in Tromsø, Tone in Elverum—but this project became their place to meet and spend as much time together as possible." The couple recently married, and they spent their honeymoon at the Efjord Cabin.
The living room includes a Coco Flip pendant, a Jardan lounge and armchair, and a CV110 Cove coffee table.
On the recommendation of a close friend, the couple flew to Texas to meet the team behind the award-winning architecture firm Lake|Flato, whose Porch House program seemed to offer the perfection solution to the family’s quick-build needs.
When the homeowners of this 1960 home in Portland’s Southwest Hills bought the property in 2009, they became the new owners of a lot of white carpeting, tired woodwork, dated wallpaper, and lackluster storage. Over time, they came to wish for a home that better suited their lives, but didn’t want to sacrifice the excellent midcentury bones. A two-pronged renovation became the answer to their problems. For the first phase completed in 2016, Fieldwork Design + Architecture remodeled the main floor. The firm swapped out the white carpeting for warm cork flooring, then strategically inserted variegated cedar planking. Fireplace surrounds received new plaster to bring in a subtle, earthy texture. Sharp black accents, whether via dining chairs or new patio doors, add definition. Fieldwork replaced the trim around the windows with CVG fir and added variegated cedar planking for warmth and texture. For the second phase of the transformation, which wrapped in 2019, Annie Wise of Annie Wise Design stepped in for a gut remodel of the kitchen and master bathroom, with the goal of ensuring any changes remained consistent with what had already been done.
The 1952 dwelling that Greg Hoffman and his wife, Kirsten Brady, bought in Portland, Oregon, had many virtues. It had history (the first owner was an inventor who made stereoscopic devices), it had a strong architectural pedigree (it was designed by respected local architect Roscoe Hemenway), and above all, it had views. But, of course, it also had its flaws: the ceilings were low, the interior was chopped into a warren of rooms, and the windows weren’t exactly abundant. "We wanted open plans, more transparency, less tiny rooms," says Greg, the VP of global brand innovation at Nike. With the aid of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson—the 50-year-old architecture firm that is best known for the Fifth Avenue Apple store in New York City—the couple embarked on a project to enrich the landscaping, simplify the layout, and add a new top floor, all while amplifying the view with more glass. After a major renovation, the midcentury home with some of the best views in Portland, Oregon, took on a drastically new look.
The sloped living room ceiling creates an intimate compression at the low end - a delightful spot to read within the tree tops, or enjoy snow falling on the street below.
The luminous parlor space features two working fireplaces (one wood, one gas). Original pocket doors provide optional separation of the living and dining areas.
A Metro modular sofa from Room & Board offers a comfy place to perch. A Hase Collection Tula 8191 wood stove by HearthStone strikes a balance between refined and rustic.
The soaring tongue-and-groove ceiling has clerestory windows at the top for added natural light. The wood beams are continued into the outdoor space. Glass sliding doors run the length of the space, seamlessly opening the entire home for indoor/outdoor entertaining.
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
The living room has reflected sofas and plenty of shelves for the library of books
All of the windows and doors are original and have been restored to full functionality by the seller.
A Regency wood-burning stove provides heating to the living space. The floors are tumbled Bluestone tiles.
Walls of double-pane, tempered, laminated glass surround the upper living space furnished with Tolomeo lights by Artemide, vintage midcentury chairs, and a custom-made redwood burl table.
Like the main house, both guest homes are lined with timber inside and out.
The interior design was handled by local firm (and a personal friend of the architects) Studio CL, which sourced all the furniture from Kavehome.
Centered around a wood-burning fireplace, the main living area feels open and airy, as it stretches to the top of the steeply pitched roof.
Inside, the Scandinavian-inspired home boasts a calming, neutral color palette, complemented by natural wood finishes and exposed metal hardware and beams.
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
"Schist is a traditional material that dominates the region. It also has great thermal mass
properties, so it made sense to embed the fireplace into the schist feature
wall in the living area. As this wall is facing ‘The Remarkables’ mountain range, there had to be a
visual connection to the mountain peak behind it and the sky above. We
concluded that using a schist wall at the base of this window would further
enhance the sense of connection and create a space that is in tune with its wider
environment."
A ceiling rosette and a chandelier by Neri & Hu add some much-needed pizzazz to the formal living room.  The lush velvet sofa is by JHID in collaboration with Master Furniture Makers and Trio Upholstery; the coffee table is another collaboration with Master Furniture Makers. The fireplace features surround tiles by Pratt and Larson.
Architect Rocio Romero designs ADUs that are conceived as studios, backyard offices, guest cottages, and short-term getaways. She’s sold over 50 prefab units in 17 different states, and recently launched a series of more modestly sized, construct-it-yourself structures dubbed the Camp series. The 456-square-foot Base Camp and 312-square-foot Fish Camp will both be priced in the $20,000 range. At just over 300 square feet, the Fish Camp is the smaller of the two Camp styles, but the prototype illustrates its utility as guesthouse or office.
The living room includes contemporary furnishings in a minimalist palette; a built-in, concrete-and-glass fire pit, and original brickwork.
A board-formed concrete fireplace anchors the living room with a framed view of the lake.
 A look at the spacious living room area, which flows into the kitchen. Built-in shelving runs along one wall, while the back corner offers a brick fireplace and windows overlooking an interior atrium space.
Another view of the home's extensive vaulted ceilings. An archway houses the main staircase, which leads to the second level and is gracefully lit by original stained glass.
Architecture firm _naturehumaine designed a dream hideaway in eastern Quebec, complete with a centralized fireplace. The modern fireplace was built into a custom, multi-purpose cabinet welded from sheets of hot-rolled steel. It stores firewood on one end with an open shelve, holds a TV, and even acts as a guardrail for the staircase.
The living room in this California home has a wood-burning fireplace and a dedicated nook for firewood storage. The nook is tall and narrow while the fireplace opening itself is long and short, creating an exciting and engaging composition on the wall.
A lot of experimentation went into the fill for the Beanie Sofa, also designed by Edwards Anker. She ultimately settled on lentils after experimenting with buckwheat, coffee beans, and other legumes. "We found that lentils were the right consistency, and shape, and size for the scale of the sofa," she says. She combined "one long bean bag" with wood skeletal support, which helps sitters to maintain healthy posture. It’s also an excellent spot to stargaze through the skylights.
In the winter, the glass facade collects heat from the southern sun, and in summertime, interior shades/curtains cut 50% of the solar heat gain.
The home's windows usher in plenty of natural light, while a crisp white color palette creates a calming, minimalist aesthetic. French doors separate the living area from the apartment's master bedroom.
Masterfully styled by acclaimed interior designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent, this one-bedroom apartment is located in a classic 19th-century brownstone and blends historic architecture with chic, contemporary design.
The house’s original asymmetry remains pronounced in the remodel. The custom island, over 11 feet long and made of fir with leather panel inlays trimmed with patina steel, was designed by Carolyn Woofter, and works to separate the living area from the enlarged dining area, which can now seat 16 people for dinner. The Cornogs commissioned the carving between the windows. It’s by Monica Setziol-Phillips, Leroy Setziol’s daughter.
"The steel-and-wood beam details in the living room, dining room, and kitchen are a nod to the fact that the big open span facing the water is achieved with a large steel beam up in the ceiling from which all those large wood beams are suspended," notes the firm. The natural materials palette in the interior includes Pioneer Millworks 'Prairie' reclaimed wood siding for the walls, stained clear vertical grain cedar ceilings (main level), and solid end grain hemlock flooring by Oregon Lumber.
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
Many of the windows facing the view were enlarged. Greg and Kirsten opted not to bring in easier-to-maintain aluminum framing. Instead they stuck with Douglas fir, albeit with thinner stocks. “I definitely felt the gravitational pull towards midcentury,” Greg explains. The original fireplace was redone in local basalt to match a pair of new hearths, one upstairs and one on the patio.
With concrete floors and pine construction, the minimalist home is designed to keep focus on the outdoors. Here in the square-shaped family room are the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.