755 Living Room Chair Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

As elsewhere, the floors are concrete and the casework is crafted of reclaimed sinker cypress.
In the living room, Piero Lissoni’s sofa for Living Divani joins a Lawson coffee table by Egg Collective and poufs from CB2. The blanket and pillows are from Muji.
In contrast to the building’s gray concrete exterior, the residence interiors feature bright pops of color from pastel blues to vibrant yellows.
The common areas are furnished with cozy, lived-in furniture.
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
The fabric wall art and pillows in the living room are by Designwork, a zero-waste textile project crafted from recycled Eileen Fisher clothing.
An abundance of south-facing windows connect the double-height living room to the outdoors.
The Oostwouders wanted a home that was low-maintenance yet sophisticated. The interior is filled with materials that match the contemporary Hill Country aesthetic of the exterior.
"Lighting was orchestrated to move with the time of day, so that as the sun sets, the outside would be felt," says Peace.
Anodized aluminum-and-glass sliding doors are all that separate guests from the peaceful environs.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
The artwork is titled "Crashing Buffalo" and is by Tucson/Los Angeles artist Ishi Glinsky.
The Adrian Pearsall sofa was sourced from The Swanky Abode on 1st Dibs, and the fire tools are also from the Sunshine Shop, a local vintage store.
Translucent louvers in the maple-clad walls and a skylight cross-ventilate the room with fresh air and bring in daylight.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living room is vented through the warehouse’s sawtooth roof, sheathed in plywood above the living room.
The gaps in the slabs formed by the U-shaped pieces are filled with clerestory windows that add to the natural light. Here, the lounge is by BoConcept and the table is by Estudio Diario.
A look at the open living area of the prefab house in Canelones, Uruguay, designed by MAPA. The roof is made of precast concrete slabs more commonly used to build bridges.
Minimalist yet cozy, this cluster-style home in a Norwegian forest offers plenty of nooks to get comfortable in.
In the study at the top of the stairwell, a Nendo v132 lamp by Oki Sato for Wästberg joins a Togo chair by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset. Theskylights throughout are by Royalite.
The stone fireplace and concrete floors add to the earthy feel of the home. The living room features a sectional by Focus One Home.
The mirrored "vault" not only reflects natural light into the interior, but also conceals an air conditioning unit, which needed a ventilated space to properly work. The lower part of the vault can be opened like a trapdoor for access.
Natural light floods the studio through a large window and is reflected into the mezzanine level via the mirrored "vault."
Concrete floors help to cool the open-plan living/dining/kitchen area.
A glass wall on the rear facade ties the compact home to the lush landscape and frames views of mountains, trees, and a lake.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
The main living space is open and bright with large openings that embrace the garden. An interior courtyard separates the main living space from a guest suite, which occupies the original front of one of the terrace homes.
Built with redwood, glass, red brick, and concrete, the house was originally designed by John Lautner for the Schaffer family, who used to spend time enjoying picnics under the resident oak trees. Lautner built the house horizontally around the oaks.
Krofchick describes the look as "Cali chic" with an infusion of ’70s spirit.
The open-plan living and dining room look out to the forest and pool through operative glass panels. The kitchen is partially concealed behind cabinetry at the far end of this space.
The neutral scheme allows furnishings to enrich the spaces.
The Loft Box is on the top floor of an ’80s walk-up apartment. The removal of false ceilings allowed Cheok to insert an attic that overlooks the living and dining spaces.
The house’s small size and compact footprint necessitated some clever spatial arrangements—like the hidden kitchen—to make the space feel bigger.
The home’s interior is minimal and streamlined, with classic modern furnishings and polished concrete floors.
Part of Kao's solution was a three-story atrium, which features a Cor-Ten steel sculpture by local artist Melissa MacDonald. The floor lamp is by Frank Lloyd Wright.
designed by Estúdio Minke
After: "The studio and the showroom share the courtyard, and the large windows bring in plenty of natural light and warmth during the winter," says the firm. "To reinforce the nature-in-the-city feel, we installed cedar siding, as well as a custom wood-burning pizza oven, which is perfect for entertaining. The base of the oven is constructed from bricks that were salvaged during demolition."
Floor-to-ceiling glass runs along the entire front facade, providing expansive views of lush forests and the Mediterranean Sea in the distance. Polished concrete and natural wood dominate the minimalist aesthetic.
For their A. Quincy Jones house in Los Angeles, architect Bruce Norelius and his partner, Landis Green, retained and restored core elements, such as the living room’s redwood paneling and concrete-block wall.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
Douglas fir beams, some of which were salvaged from the original home that sat on the property, run in perpendicular lines overhead. Certain sections of the ceiling are exposed, while others are covered in drywall. For flooring, the residents, who have two young children, selected durable polished concrete. The Sven Charme sofa is by Article and the teak bureau is vintage.
"What I love the most is the natural light that comes in—it feels lofty and refreshing," says Frank.
A view down from the loft into the expansive space. Rafters and joists frame the pitched roof, while built-in cabinetry runs down both sides of the open living and dining room.
An Italian architecture studio took advantage of an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood. While its exterior offers a smoother, stuccoed appearance, its interiors give way to a juxtaposition of two different concrete applications, opting for a rougher, board-formed treatment on the walls and a quartz paste polish on the floors. Wood accents, by way of the trimwork, doors, and cabinetry, provide rich, striking counterpoints.
Clerestory windows bring additional light into the main area of the house.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
When a couple approached Colorado-based Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects for a modern mountain retreat, they brought with them images of what would be the founding inspiration behind the new design—a simple and rugged cabin in Norway where the husband and his relatives had been gathering since the 1950s. Much like this ancestral Norwegian cabin, the new getaway is designed with the same rustic charms and deference to the landscape, as well as an inviting environment for friends and family to gather for generations to come.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
The den sits on the far end of the living area, and it has the only TV in the house—a family rule so that they spend time together. The space can also be a guest room for relatives visiting from Brazil. There are two bedrooms and a master suite on the second level.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
Drawing light into the interior was the main priority. Large north-facing openings and skylights ensure natural light is in abundance.
The carpeting was removed to reveal the concrete slab underneath, which was finished with epoxy paint. “That room just beckoned to be an entertainer’s paradise,” says Wei.
Wei covered the bar in plywood cut in diagonal strips, alternating four different stains to create color variation. The coffered ceiling received Azurite in Beige/Gold from the Albany Misuto Wallpaper Collection.
The house’s glassed-in living room provides plenty of scenery. The hanging fireplace and exposed rafters add a sense of lightness as well.
The living room includes a Coco Flip pendant, a Jardan lounge and armchair, and a CV110 Cove coffee table.
On the recommendation of a close friend, the couple flew to Texas to meet the team behind the award-winning architecture firm Lake|Flato, whose Porch House program seemed to offer the perfection solution to the family’s quick-build needs.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.