148 Living Room Chair Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Jay and Jaclyn Lieber worked with Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir and Tryggvi Thorsteinsson of Minarc to design a house using the designers’ mnmMOD panels, which can be assembled with a screw gun.
A carefully placed window illuminates the corner of the main living area.
The sitting room.
Sheridan Coakley, owner of the London-based furnishings purveyor SCP, uses his circa-1970s home as a testing ground for the furnishings he carries in his company’s inventory. In the foreground, a Balzac lounge chair by Matthew Hilton is draped with a Donna Wilson blanket.
Goneau highlighted the red brick wall in the living room by leaving it bare and protecting it behind museum-quality glass. The space also features a floor-to-ceiling window that’s coated on the outside with a reflective film, letting residents keep their curtains open by day without fear of being seen from the street. The green sofa is by St-Laurent Domison and the white oak chairs are by Hans Wegner. All other furniture is custom.
Architect Ester Bruzkus of Bruzkus Batek redesigned a compact apartment in Berlin to serve as her home. The previous layout had two bedrooms and one bathroom, but Bruzkus created an open-plan arrangement with only one bedroom to free up space. A folding wall can be pulled out for privacy. Custom furniture joins pieces by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller and Gervasoni. The bathroom is enclosed within the black cube, which can be entered from either the bedroom side or the living room side. The paintings are by Berlin-based artist Niki Elbe.
Living Room
The house is heated by radiant hydronic heat and the ground floor includes a concrete slab that’s heated to a constant temperature. Additionally, approximately 97 percent of the house is lit with efficient LED lights.
Plasterboard was used on the walls and ceilings of the interiors to accentuate an abundance of natural light.
High ceilings and clerestory windows fill the public rooms with light.
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Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Most of the home’s furniture was purchased at Restoration Hardware, Circa Modern, or antique shops. “We both love the midcentury designs that we grew up with,” Bronee says. “We wanted furniture that was authentic to us and our personal styles while also fitting into a Catskills hideaway barn.”
The house captures meadow views, thanks to three large sliding doors by Loewen that lead out to a big deck. “We wanted to hide the view from visitors until you get inside, so it would feel like a surprise when walking in,” Bronee says. “This also gives us the sense of being tucked in and cozy in the winter with a view of the meadow, and in the summer it feels like indoors and outdoors are connected. We live just as much on the deck as we do inside.”
A late-1950s set of sofa and chairs inherited from Gaffney’s granny warm up the living room, as do the stove from Charnwood and the coffee table the couple bought from Habitat for their first flat.
Great Room with steel-clad fireplace, concrete floors and wood beams
With exposed industrial materials for finishes, the interior includes hand-troweled, waxed concrete floors, Douglas fir beams, and sealed-plywood ceilings.
The most dramatic engineering challenge came to the cantilevered corner for an unobstructed view on the northeast corner of the space. The posts hold 3 stories and a roof above, and are made of 6" diameter tube steel. This allows the Fleetwood doors to close to a corner and provides clean views of Downtown San Francisco and the East Bay Hills.
The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.
Sticotti and Hernaez relax in their living room, where custom-built windows and sliding doors enhance the indoor-outdoor effect.
For their A. Quincy Jones house in Los Angeles, architect Bruce Norelius and his partner, Landis Green, retained and restored core elements, such as the living room’s redwood paneling and concrete-block wall.
Wooten handpicked every piece in the house, such as the 1955 Medea chair by Vittorio Nobili, near which he placed an abandoned bird’s nest he found on the property.
Architect William Massie built a hybrid prefab home for vintage retailer Greg Wooten, who handled the interiors. In the living room is a 1950s Franco Albini rattan chair, a Crate chair designed by Gerrit Rietveld in 1934, and a 1970s sofa by Edward Axel Roffman. The tall ceramic piece is by Bruno Gambone.
Birdsall plays with her son Atticus in the living room next to a Charles sofa from B&B Italia. Formwork also designed the coffee table—fitting, since the architects come from strong fabrication backgrounds.
Sunken Living Room with See Thru Fireplace
A Nelson sofa sits on a handmade Persian Mahi rug in the living room.
In the office are Metropolitan chairs by Jeffrey Bernett for B&B Italia. Most artwork hung throughout the house comes from Sette’s art gallery.
The standing seam metal roof consists of steel panels coated with corrosion-resistant coating.
Moreland House
In a portion of the living area, Le Corbusier’s LC2 chair is set alongside Pablo Pardo’s Elise lamp.
A suspended fireplace by Fire Orb provides a shared hearth for friends and family to gather around.
McMinn, an architect, helps Soren construct a TinkerToy tower. The cowhide rug is from Perfect Leather Goods, and the Wassily Chair is by Marcel Breuer for Knoll.
A rocking chair that once belonged to Deb’s grandmother sits next to the plaster fireplace in the living room; concrete floors were poured on-site.
In the living room, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs flank a Marcel Breuer for Isokon nesting table. Above the Florence Knoll–designed credenza is a print by English artist Terry Frost. The adjacent deck holds Breuer’s Folding Armchair and a table from Aram in London.
A band of precast concrete, which holds a custom bench, wraps around the downstairs living area. The striped cushion fabric was purchased in Antwerp. A wood-framed AP71 lounge chair by Hans Wegner and a seat by Wim Rietveld, the son of famed Dutch designer Gerrit Rietveld, outfit the space. Underfloor heating installed throughout the house allows for a flexible layout: “There aren’t any radiators cluttering up the rooms,” Jeffries explains.
Three interlocking materials: a self-heated concrete floor; double-glazed windows that let the outdoors in while keeping out the cold; and wooden panels manufactured in a Denmark factory are used to created this Copenhagen prefab home with interior birch plywood walls that give the space a warm and bright feel.
“We both love the Dogpatch for many reasons. It’s the right amount of balance, being a little removed from the bustle of San Francisco, and there’s a great sense of community among the eclectic inhabitants. It feels like an island within a city.”
www.adj.com.hk   @studioadjective
Pentimento’s true versatility is revealed with each new tenant who inhabits the structure. As Nicolas demonstrates, the polished concrete floors make for an ideal biking surface. When playtime is over, he hangs his bike on the wall by the front door, suspending it from the handlebars to keep the floor tidy.
Herman Pasternak, an engineer and consultant who designs water treatment systems, is a childhood friend of Pentimento’s owner, Desirée Marín, and now rents the house. He selected woven plastic chairs from Dream Works, a local company, for his reading room because they “go with the inside-outside concept of the house.”
The property has a soaring sense of space thanks to the vaulted ceilings.
“The setup really works for our lifestyles, since work and play are often the same thing.”
Living room
The 1,200-square-foot apartment suite comes with a cozy bohemian couch by Busnelli and an orange-hued hanging light and futuristic, blue Bianco table by Knibb Design.

Every room at the Line hotel offers floor-to-ceiling windows that appear to frame views of the city, including the surrounding 1960s modernist skyscrapers, and in some cases the distant cityscape and Hollywood sign. Concrete is the main design element of the hotel, and it adds an authentically urban ambiance to each of the 388 rooms, which also showcase large-print photographs from LA-based artist Kevin Hanley and furnishings designed by Sean Knibb.
The couple supplemented the rawness of the open living area with funky secondhand finds from the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.

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