319 Living Room Bookcase Sofa Design Photos And Ideas

"Some must-haves for our space were lots of plants, beautiful mirrors to open up the space, and textured throw pillows," says Jules Acree.
A deck opens up to the west from the main living space, and it’s the perfect place to watch the sunset. A long, low window at the rear of the space frames the tree line.
The clients fell in love with the double-sided Cheminees Philippe fireplace, which had been used in a previous Modscape project they had seen. “It works nicely in this home to help subtly define each space, and it’s a stunning feature,” says Modscape managing director Jan Gyrn.
Now, the kitchen sits at the front of the building, and the counter runs beneath the preserved windows. Built-in shelves frame the view.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
Astrain updated the fireplace with a Carrara marble Victorian fireplace surround from The Architectural Forum.
Astrain streamlined the storage in the room, making room for wall art and allowing light to be diffused throughout.
The bespoke sofa in the retreat features rich purple upholstery that contrasts with the more neutral white and timber finishes, creating an element of sophisticated drama.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
The artwork is titled "Crashing Buffalo" and is by Tucson/Los Angeles artist Ishi Glinsky.
The Adrian Pearsall sofa was sourced from The Swanky Abode on 1st Dibs, and the fire tools are also from the Sunshine Shop, a local vintage store.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
The custom-designed white maple modular coffee table can be kept together as one piece, or separated to form stools or smaller tables. "Each of the four cubes is slightly different, with a storage recess or dividing panel for stowing books, magazines, pillows, or other objects," says Thomas.
The living room received a Muuto Connect sofa, which was "notched into" the custom media cabinetry. The existing wood floors were refinished with an ebony satin stain with a charcoal tone.
Maison Gauthier was intended to serve as a permanent family home rather than as a simple summer residence, and it adopts a more substantial sense of scale and materiality. The residence was designed for Jean Prouvé’s own daughter, Françoise—who was married to a doctor—and her young family. The site near Saint-Dié is to the southeast of the city of Nancy, where Prouvé had built his own family home some years earlier. The single-level home perches on the side of a hill, looking towards the town. It features walls made of insulated aluminum panels sitting on concrete foundations, along with horizontal strip windows around the bedrooms at one end of the building and more extensive glazing around the living area at the other.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
Red Hook’s proximity to the water is reflected in the living room’s "sea vibe."
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
A sizable window in the living room frames a view of of the adjacent pine tree forest. A recycled Rimu timber shelf above the window provides additional storage.
Some of the furnishings came from the homeowners’ Dallas home, including the wooden chairs they purchased 35 years ago. The sofa is the Madison Sleeper Sofa from Bo Concept, while the side table is from Target. The lamp is from CB2. A British, antique officer’s cabinet contrasts with a modern bookshelf from Crate and Barrel.
“The fireplace/bookcase wall installation takes cues from the Cado Shelving System, and also works to flatten the classic hovering fireplace into a gesture that is engaged with the wall,” says Keating. “Usability and modularity are both important elements of an interior that in some ways is like one big studio containing the objects of—and inspirations for—the client’s artistic interests.”
Generous cut-outs in the support wall connect the main living areas. The Togo couch and chairs are from Ligne Roset, and the sculpture is by Annie Morris.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
The interiors are compact and feature abundant, built-in storage. This room faces out onto the spa that anchors the swimming pool on the north side of the home.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
London–based Steyn Studio designed a three-bedroom home on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain, that stands out from its neighbors with a striking sawtooth roof. The project, nicknamed the Sierra House for both its peaked profile and its location in one of Madrid’s northwestern neighborhoods between Mirasierra and Montecarmelo, features furniture and window treatments that complement the neutral tones of the exterior and interior materials. Textured walls of board-formed concrete provide visual interest in the living room.
The curvy shape of this pink sofa gives it a fun, playful quality.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
A central feature of the space are the stacked stone walls, which line all three sides of the room and feature original inscriptions from local workers.
On the opposite side of the entry hall is the living room. A double fronted log burner sits within the stone chimney at the center of the space.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
What was once the industrial loft of a knitting mill is now a modern canvas for a collection of some 300 pieces of art. One can find pieces from Alexander Calder, Dan Flavin, John McCracken, Gary Hume, Francis Picabia, and more covering this renovated loft by Fiedler Marciano Architecture in conjunction with the art-loving husband-and-wife team that own the home. While the collection informed many of the elements, the space is a fusing, or conversation, rather, between the art, architecture, and design. The owners wanted a home, not a gallery.
One of the home's many stunning features is its cathedral-like living area with exposed redwood beams rising over 20 feet. A large red-brick fireplace enhances the room's regal aesthetic.
The home’s main living area features cathedral ceilings and a large loft overhead. The space is divided by a stone fireplace and built-ins that lead to the kitchen.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
The four-bed, four-bath home of Peter and Sarah Diamond and their two adult children is uniquely situated in one of the most remote areas of the Berkshires: Mount Washington, Massachusetts.
At no more than $25 a pop, these affordable goodies are downright perfect for everyone you know.
Ladder to loft adds a playful element.
A bright and airy sitting room featuring exposed brick, wood-paneled ceilings, and horizontal built-in shelving provides a quiet, cozy place to rest and relax.
A built-in window seat across from the kitchen gives guests a spot to sit close to the cooking action.
The ground floor features Douglas fir flooring. The living room at the front of the house is separated from the entrance hallway by a black steel-framed glazed partition.
Thirteen windows in the apartment help maximize the fantastic views. The seating—including a sectional from West Elm and daybed from BoConcept—is now complemented by a fireplace specified by the firm.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
A look at the spacious family room, which features additional built-ins, wooden beams and paneling, as well as clerestory windows that invite long rays of natural light into the space.
Smartly tucked underneath the stairs is a full bath.
The firm raised the height and increased the width of the new opening between the kitchen and dining room.
The space after renovations, with cantilevering cabinetry along the perimeter to preserve and protect Hall's original radiant heating vents in the windowsills—an example of his innovative solutions for meeting the space's functional needs.
The bright pink and leopard print furnishings are reminiscent of Betsey's clothing line.
Ed Parker and his wife, Barbara Tutino Parker, use the TV room cabinet to store their overflowing book collection. Though not a library per se, it serves as such for the Brooklyn brownstone.
Open shelving between the living room and dining area maximizes light and air flow and showcases eclectic objects, which include old printing blocks found at a garage sale and bowls homeowner Kathryn Tyler’s mother bought in South Africa. For Tyler, storage is critical. "It's something that always gets overlooked but it's actually the most important thing. I calculated the linear footage of the books I own to make sure everything would fit."

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.