290 Living Room Bookcase Chair Design Photos And Ideas

The classic post-and-beam style defines the home's interior. Exposed wood ceilings and lightly colored hardwood floors run throughout the open concept living area.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
What was once the industrial loft of a knitting mill is now a modern canvas for a collection of some 300 pieces of art. One can find pieces from Alexander Calder, Dan Flavin, John McCracken, Gary Hume, Francis Picabia, and more covering this renovated loft by Fiedler Marciano Architecture in conjunction with the art-loving husband-and-wife team that own the home. While the collection informed many of the elements, the space is a fusing, or conversation, rather, between the art, architecture, and design. The owners wanted a home, not a gallery.
One of the home's many stunning features is its cathedral-like living area with exposed redwood beams rising over 20 feet. A large red-brick fireplace enhances the room's regal aesthetic.
The home’s main living area features cathedral ceilings and a large loft overhead. The space is divided by a stone fireplace and built-ins that lead to the kitchen.
The sitting room juxtaposes a collection of books against landscape views for a “coming together of opposites,” the firm says.
If they can’t leave a used bookstore without copping at least three paperbacks at $1 apiece, we’ve got a gift for them.
A bright and airy sitting room featuring exposed brick, wood-paneled ceilings, and horizontal built-in shelving provides a quiet, cozy place to rest and relax.
A Regency wood-burning stove provides heating to the living space. The floors are tumbled Bluestone tiles.
With an impressive width of over 21.5 feet, the home offers exceptional scale, spanning 4,730 square feet over five floors. It also includes an excavated 850-square-foot basement.
A look at the spacious family room, which features additional built-ins, wooden beams and paneling, as well as clerestory windows that invite long rays of natural light into the space.
In the lofted sleeping area, a custom-made steel railing is painted black.
The firm raised the height and increased the width of the new opening between the kitchen and dining room.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
Books pepper the Toronto apartment, but most are housed in two libraries, one of which is dedicated to art and photography. It also features a Palms lounger by Dutch designer Frans Schrofer and the painting Any Number of Preoccupations by Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. The second bedroom, which also functions as a library, has Vitsœ shelving and houses owner Kenneth Montague’s book collection.
Open shelving between the living room and dining area maximizes light and air flow and showcases eclectic objects, which include old printing blocks found at a garage sale and bowls homeowner Kathryn Tyler’s mother bought in South Africa. For Tyler, storage is critical. "It's something that always gets overlooked but it's actually the most important thing. I calculated the linear footage of the books I own to make sure everything would fit."
Houston-based designer Barbara Hill is known for a stripped-down aesthetic that blends art-world cachet with Texas modernism. Vitra’s Slow chair sits in front of a powder-coated-steel bookcase made by Hill’s go-to fabricator, George Sacaris; it was originally built for the Houston house.
The sliding doors on both sides allow the house to be entirely open to tropical breezes. Floor-to-ceiling glass also offers expansive views of the landscape and beyond.
Another view of the living room and the sliding glass doors that open to the porch. In total, the home features 100 feet of glass spanning the full with of the front and rear facades.
A bookcase was built along the 30-foot long anchor wall in the large living space. The shelves are inset several inches away from the glass walls on either side, intended to create a floating effect that mirrors the way the house itself floats above the ground.
A cozy leather chair anchors the living room and adds traditional flair. The bookshelves are decorated with personal items, a Samsung television that looks like a piece of art, and a miniature horse statue Simon bought in Round Top.
The sunken living room features many custom-made pieces, including the patterned chairs and large sofa. "We work with companies that we've had relationships with for many years," Simon says. The side tables are Noir, lamps are from Arteriors, while the cocktail table is from 1stDibs. "We wanted the look to be affordable but accessible and paired with vintage pieces," she says. "You want it to come together without looking like a West Elm Showroom and you run into issues when you buy things all from retail stores, so that's why you should pick pieces that fit the personality of the home."
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
CH25 chairs by Carl Hansen, a Flexform sofa, and a Gan rug outfit the cozy, uncluttered living room.
The main living area follows the same minimalist style, with enough room for a large table, sofa, and built-in work area. A large sliding door leads out to the rear deck.
Front entry and living area.
A door was replaced with an internal window that sheds light on the stairwell and a cat flap, so that the cats can move between rooms even if the kitchen door is closed.
The unit is 3.5 meters long and 2.4 meters tall, and is a chic focal point in the room.
Using heat-treated pine and bricks, Wood Arkitektur + Design built a casual family retreat on a family compound in Hellerud, a borough of Oslo, Norway. Situated on a natural slope, the house is divided into split levels. The exterior is swathed in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, alongside charcoal bricks. The rotating, open-faced fireplace here is the Ergofocus model from French company Focus.
In the downstairs loft, an Eames chair sits amid a steel sculpture garden; it’s the perfect place to sit and view an abstract expressionist painting by Bradley Walker Tomlin, hung from the ceiling.
Francis Mill emphasizes the importance of "uninterrupted looking" at home. This niche in the cave offers a tranquil place to read or contemplate art.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs to create an accessible design that was decades ahead of his time, including thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house.
"The wood structure has a depth that creates a play of shadows through the day and a calm atmosphere resembling the feeling of sitting under a tree," says the firm.
Short staircases lead to sequestered nooks made for contemplation and getting work done. "The concrete floors and stairs dissolve the division of inside and outside," says Atelier Oslo. "The interior becomes part of the landscape, and walking in and around the cabin gives a unique experience, where the different qualities from the site become part of the architecture."
In the kitchen, light-colored, ash-veneer custom cabinetry is balanced with charcoal Silestone quartz counters.
Double-height, steel-framed glass doors connect the entire home to its beachfront setting.
Rockwell Group designed a flexible second-floor lobby with a co-working space and meeting rooms with transformable furniture, allowing them to double as lounges. “In a typical hotel, you can’t use a meeting room or other daytime spaces at night, and nightclubs sit empty during the day,” says Mitchell Hochberg, president of Lightstone Group. “We don’t have the option of doing that here.” Images of classical sculptures, warped by digital glitches, are in keeping with the tongue-in-cheek mood; miniature sculptures on the shelves cheekily take selfies or don leopard-print Speedos.
A mezzanine loft level provides extra floor space without increasing the home's footprint. Built-in bookshelves double as a guardrail for the lofted work space, accessed by a built-in ladder.
The family loves books. This wall of bookshelves was custom-designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and fabricated by Tomlinson Woodworks. A bespoke reading nook is on the right.
The first floor is a continuous public space featuring a dining area, kitchen, and living room.
To maximize functionality in the original two-story home, Office of Architecture treated the residence to a complete gut renovation, which allowed for the new four-level layout.
The boat is heated by a Webasto high-performance water heating system and calorifier, and has radiators throughout. Its 4x 130w solar panels allow for 100-percent off-grid living.
Featuring a thoughtful curation of collected antiques and retro pieces, the boat has also been fitted with custom-built furniture, including the bookshelves, sofa, and kitchen table.
In the sitting area next to the bedroom wing, the exterior panels take the form of interior bookshelves. Framed with glass above, below, and between, the shelves allow nature to peek through.
The living room features a dramatic stone fireplace and vaulted tongue-and-groove ceilings.
Built in 2013, the boat has a large, timber-framed skylight that bathes the space in light, while creating the perfect place to grow plants.
Living Room 01
The "library under the stars" features thousands of old books plucked from antique shops.
A sunroom provides additional living space.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.