435 Living Room Rug Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Wallpaper, ceiling features, George Nelson bubble lamps, and a slatted wood wall help differentiate areas in the open space. "I went a little crazy with wallpaper," says Flore. "I think it's more interesting than paint. But the best wallpaper here is this ocean. It’s good for creativity, good for life."
Sean Brown’s Toronto apartment is stacked with a collection of nostalgic magazines from the 90s and early 2000s, coordinating with his viral CD rugs.
The living and dining room look out to the central courtyard, promoting indoor/outdoor living. Here, five doors slide into a pocket in the wall to create a nearly 23-foot-wide opening on one side looking into the garden. Another set on the opposite side enhances cross ventilation.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
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The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
Facing a COVID-19 shutdown, Taylor and Michaella McClendon recruited their family to build a breezy tiny home on the Big Island—which you can now purchase for $99,800.
The living room features a sofa by Medley Home, a rug by Dash & Albert from Annie Selke, Akari Paper Lanterns by Noguchi, and an Aluminum Group Management chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller.
Custom pendants by GRT hang from above in the open kitchen and work area.
The low-slung sofa, from Medley, is non-toxic—like almost all of the furnishings here. The kitchen, too, is built from non-toxic materials. “You could actually eat the stain we used for the floors,” says Christina. No- or low-VOC stains and sealers were used throughout, and the spray-foam insulation in the walls is also low-VOC.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The sitting room on the ground floor features a Mangas Space Plait modular sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Spanish brand Gan, from Hub Furniture in Melbourne. “The materials had to essentially take a back seat to the view and the internal soft furnishings, which is where all the vibrancy and color would come from, along with the occupants and what they would bring to the table,” says architect Tony Vella. “A clear undertaking from our client was to avoid painted, rendered, tiled, or applied finishes at all costs—which was not an easy task!”
A sliding timber door elegantly conceals both the television and storage in the first-floor living room.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The artwork in the first-floor living room is by contemporary figurative artist Kathrin Longhurst. Colorful pieces, such as the artwork and furniture, bring a sense of vibrancy into the otherwise minimal home.
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
With a coat of paint and new appliances and furnishings, the 880-square-foot space maintains its cozy cabin feel, while also feeling fresh and new.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
Canadian Castaway features a simple and rustic aesthetic with a focus on raw materials. "I didn’t want to paint the wood white, for instance," the owner says. "I just wanted to let it age naturally and invite it to mirror the natural world it's now a part of."
Jane Austen's restored family home in Bath, England, is now a rental on Airbnb. Sunlight from a central courtyard pours into the living area, which features a cosy seating area and several nooks for writing or reading.
The simple, lightweight timber-and-metal roof extends over the living space and out to the veranda. This was the most costly part of the build, but it was essential to achieving the architect’s vision. Initially, he had planned to use a green roof, however the clients were concerned about ongoing maintenance.
In Pawling, close to wineries and the Appalachian Trail, this is a prime place, complete with porch swing, to unwind in between tastings and recreational adventures. Adorned with beams, it oozes a decidedly attractive country charm. A cherry red leather armchair, for instance, meshes brilliantly with a stone wall and a log coffee table, and bench seating and a piano give the old-timey kitchen character.
Poughkeepsie’s joys include Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting the city to Highland on the west bank, as well as a booming craft-beer scene. This contemporary cottage is just the place to settle in to revel in it all. Scandinavian design simplicity juxtaposes more homey touches like plants and a wall shelf filled with colorful games and books. Roomy tables, found both indoors and out, invite plenty of farm-fresh meals upon returning from Wappinger Creek and a stroll through the landscaped gardens.
Beyond its sliding doors, this storybook barn in Gallatin is airy and filled with natural light, courtesy of old, quirky window sashes. Original wood from the vast, open structure—privacy awaits in the reading nook—has been re-imagined and bolstered by throw rugs and glamorous chandeliers. With views onto the pastoral meadow, alfresco grilling feasts around the deck’s hand-made black locust table are bound to become a nightly occurrence.
This silk-and-wool rug was custom-designed by Gideon Mendelson for this Westchester home. The design was executed by Sprung & Rich.
A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
Designer Cortney Bishop used antique Serapi rugs—a type of Persian carpet—that she sourced from a local dealer to guide the design of this residence in Knoxville, Tennessee.
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
A close up of Saksi's "Aura
The interiors of the home feature light wood-paneled ceilings, large picture windows, and exclusive custom furniture and lighting also designed by Aalto.
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
A Cheminees Philippe fireplace adds a rustic touch to the living space.
There are many textures at play in the living room—the board-formed concrete ceiling, the light brick wall, wood paneling, and the terrazzo floors. "The texture of the timber is reflected in the concrete," says Peake. The lightwell adds an additional internal light source and another spot to insert greenery. The Vibia Palma wall sconce from Koda Lighting is affixed to the wall over the sofa.
In the richly hued living room, a Milo Baughman coffee table with a chrome base and custom marble top pairs with Milo Baughman barrel chairs that have been reupholstered in a saturated blue fabric. A custom velvet sofa adds another textured layer. A custom light fixture with crystal bulbs from The Future Perfect hangs like jewelry above the space, and a geometric painting by senior JHID designer Chelsie Lee ties the colors together.
A three-seater Ella sofa and footrest in Vega Anthracit by Sofacompany anchor the living room. The steel coffee table is by Lim and the rug is from Coral & Hive. The shelving and cabinets are custom from Holz Cabinetry. The lamp is from Vamp and the lampshade is from Skinny laMinx. The chairs are from Chair Crazy and the television is from Samsung.
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
Built-in shelving in the ground-floor living area provides ample storage for books and records. “This is my favourite chair, where I like to sit and watch the fire or read a book,” says the owner.
A hammock chair in the living room overlooks the wood stove at the center and the sofa against the west wall, creating a cozy living space.
The main living area on the ground floor has 20-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan. The high ceilings allow the 395-square-foot home to feel expansive, light, and breezy. In cold weather, the owner grows seedlings by the south-facing windows.
“I’ve been looking at cabins and small homes since I was a teenager,” says the owner. “I knew I wanted the home to have a small footprint, but for the interior space to still feel open and expansive.” This informed the interior planning, as he knew he didn’t want the upper floors to completely enclose the ground floor. By minimizing the second floor and including an open third-floor loft bedroom, he was able to maintain a spacious feeling and avoid making the interior spaces feel too enclosed.
The great room is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the back of the space (which is just a slice of the all-glass rear) includes a bi-fold NanaWall door system that opens the home to an outdoor terrace and the lush surroundings.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.