132 Living Room Rug Floors Medium Hardwood Floors End Tables Design Photos And Ideas

For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
Exposed wooden beams cap the living room, which also features banks of oversized windows that open the space to Griffith Park.
While thoughtfully updated for modern-day living, the loft retains a trove of original details, including built-in cabinetry that was part of the original classroom space. One can imagine the units filled with microscopes or specimens during the building's schoolhouse past.
Conveniently located near downtown Detroit, Apartment No. 39 is the latest Leland Lofts condo to hit the market. Offered for $324,000, the 1,360-square-foot space features a spacious open layout and was recently treated to a top-down renovation. Restored hardwoods run throughout.
A modern farmhouse outside Tahoe National Forest stands as a vacation home and gallery for the owner’s art. Designed by architect Clare Walton, Martis Camp House consists of four gable forms divided by stone-clad volumes. Inside, the spaces are a collaboration between the owner, an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. A departure from the owner’s main residence that exudes a more traditional style, the summer and winter getaway is teeming with bespoke furniture, vintage finds, and personal art.
Custom-built from the ground up, a 360-square-foot tiny house on wheels is an affordable, off-grid paradise for a family of three in Hawaii.
The luminous parlor space features two working fireplaces (one wood, one gas). Original pocket doors provide optional separation of the living and dining areas.
In the living room, a blue-gray velvet sofa is paired with a live-edge walnut coffee table and two marine-blue armchairs over an oval area rug.
Comfortable yet elegant seating fills the open living space. Large, triangular windows provide views to the lake while filling the interior with daylight. A new in-floor radiant heating system warms the open and airy living spaces.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
Theodora's Berlin abode has all the artsy feels.
The living room, where a large industrial-style window facilitates plenty of sunlight.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
Fotsch reframed the great room, adding 14
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
Clare Conklin's living room features subtle earth tones and a mix of wood finishes.
The Ori Cloud Bed fits perfectly into the wooden baffles of the canopy above. The back cushions of the sofa turn into a headboard when the bed is lowered.
A variety of carefully placed windows fill the living/dining/kitchen unit with light while maintaining a sense of privacy.
The home's asymmetrical gabled roof defines the ceiling heights of the interior spaces.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
After a tragic motorcycle accident, Derek and LeAnne Lavender were on the search for a home that could be easily renovated to accommodate the couple's needs. LeAnne says, "It's amazing what you don't notice until you have no choice but to notice it. We had no idea how many homes built in the ‘80s had sunken family rooms, or all the bedrooms upstairs, which just wouldn’t work for us." After looking at more than 50 potential homes, they settled on a 1952 ranch-style home that had a lot of potential.
The coffee table is from Farmhaus Modern, and the black stepped planters are from Cone 10.
If you're looking to shoot your home yourself, Bartlam offers this tip: "Consider introducing some 'signs of life,' such as eye glasses, or a mug next to an open book—things that show someone lives there but are visually attractive, too!"
The wall paneling and living room screens are a waxed white oak.
The cozy living room is furnished with a hand-me-down couch with a cover purchased from Amazon. The ottoman is from TJ Maxx. The area rug, side table, and pillows are from Target.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
At a project in Los Angeles, AphroChic used warm pinks and grays, along with lots of greenery, to bring the outdoors in and make this Mission-style home classic and yet up-to-date.
At an apartment in Brooklyn, New York, interior designer Kesha Franklin of Halden Interiors uses a mixture of neutral grays and blues in the living room with punches of deep reds and a leather chair for texture.
An E14 Palo Floor Lamp from Living Edge creates a moment for reading.
A fireplace serves as a boundary between the indoor and outdoor areas.
Materials enhance this natural connection, reflecting the silvery hues of the overcast sky of the Pacific Northwest and tying the building to the forest floor.
All built-in furnishings were designed by the architects. The height-adjustable tables are from Billiani.
Breakfast bar seating lies next to a tiny, efficient kitchen.
The couple efficiently divided the space to create fully functional zones. This view is from the bed looking towards the other end of the Airstream.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
If they aren’t at the cocktail-fueled Evening Bar, chances are guests are hanging out in the “living room”—at least until the beer hall Brakeman and fried chicken joint Penny Red’s open.
A motley assortment of contemporary local and international art curated by the Detroit gallery Library Street Collective enlivens the hotel.
Awash in blue, the prominent "living room" is not just a social hangout for Shinola Hotel guests, but the downtown Detroit community.
An abundance of glazing pours light into the house. Hardwood floors are used throughout the home.
Prices start at $2,850 and include utilities and furnishings, allowing residents to readily move into an ‘Instagram-worthy’ home. A dedicated Node community curator helps residents settle in.
The view of the lake from the living area.
Of the many architectural landmarks in Los Angeles, few are as iconic of Hollywood’s film industry as the Ennis House, which hit the market after a $17,000,000 renovation.
There are four viewing decks to take in the spectacular scenery and sunsets. The extensive glazing forms a seamless integration of indoor-outdoor space.
The home features a flexible and open floorplan that has a bright and airy flow.
The kitchen console is clad in industrially polished copper.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
A continuous deck or veranda, called engawa in Japanese, functions as both a step and seat, to seamlessly connect the house to the garden. Deep eaves, or hisashi, provide cover and reflect light from the interior.
Interior spaces, such as the main living area, deliberately frame exterior views. Per the architects: "Thus, the beautiful oak trees on the opposite side of the creek are still 'belonging' to this house by the use of a technique called shakkei or borrowed scenery—to expand limits visually."
The home features built-ins like this bookshelf in the living space.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
This bright suite features a furnished balcony.
The floor-to-ceiling windows are made from tempered glass that can withstand temperatures up to 450 degrees. The windows provide stunning views from the Sunset Strip to the ocean.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.