295 Living Room Rug Floors Medium Hardwood Floors Chair Design Photos And Ideas

For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
The first step was to tear out the existing wall-to-wall carpeting and replace it with cabin-grade, oak flooring to give the house a classic feel and to help anchor the more modern walls and trim. They ordered the flooring from a large company and despite it being the cheapest option offered, the total expense came to $2,300 for materials, making the wood floors—according to Anderson—their biggest splurge.
A timber window seat is surrounded by secret storage cabinets, adding functionality to otherwise unused space.
The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard.
An open floor plan seamlessly weaves the home's main living areas together. Here, another look at the living room which features an exposed wood ceiling and beams.
While thoughtfully updated for modern-day living, the loft retains a trove of original details, including built-in cabinetry that was part of the original classroom space. One can imagine the units filled with microscopes or specimens during the building's schoolhouse past.
A modern farmhouse outside Tahoe National Forest stands as a vacation home and gallery for the owner’s art. Designed by architect Clare Walton, Martis Camp House consists of four gable forms divided by stone-clad volumes. Inside, the spaces are a collaboration between the owner, an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. A departure from the owner’s main residence that exudes a more traditional style, the summer and winter getaway is teeming with bespoke furniture, vintage finds, and personal art.
The opposite end of the living room flows into a formal dining area. An expansive picture window and sliding doors overlook the lush city property.
Another view of the living space. A large sliding door spans the entire width of the room, while windows extend to fill the rest of the gable end.
The home’s main living area features cathedral ceilings and a large loft overhead. The space is divided by a stone fireplace and built-ins that lead to the kitchen.
This living room features a custom sofa and leather, brass, and hardwood armchairs by Atra Form. A cluster of coffee tables includes the Paloma painted steel coffee table designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez, a custom brushed brass side table by Atra Form, and the Telugu Suar stained wood side table by NAMUH.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
The luminous parlor space features two working fireplaces (one wood, one gas). Original pocket doors provide optional separation of the living and dining areas.
Up the stairs is a light-filled living room which features Tasmanian oak flooring and 10-foot-tall ceilings. According the the listing, the couple "loved to host lively intellectual affairs with their circle of friends, global dignitaries, and artists" in this very space.
Soaring ceilings continue into the airy upper-floor living room, complete with large, north-facing windows and an anchoring exposed brick fireplace.
McCrae House 1
In the living room, a blue-gray velvet sofa is paired with a live-edge walnut coffee table and two marine-blue armchairs over an oval area rug.
Smooth limestone tiles clad the fireplace, which is topped with an oak mantle. A small seating area with two wood ottomans is arranged adjacent to the fireplace, which opens up to the larger living area.
One of the highlights of the home is the glass bi-fold doors, which emphasize the L.A. residents' embrace of indoor-outdoor living.
The living room is warmed by a Morsø 1440 cast-iron stove and features a pair of calfskin folding seats that are original to the house.
Tasked by John Powers and Jennifer Bostic with renovating a run-down cottage that was never meant to be lived in year round, Otto Ruano of Lead Studios transformed the space while keeping as much of it intact as possible. Potence lamps by Jean Prouvé illuminate the kitchen and living area. The bifold doors are by Loewen.
Each home that Wright designed was unique to its circumstances, and the Penfield House was no exception. Set on 30 acres in Lake County, Ohio, the 1950 home has taller ceilings and an elongated profile to accommodate the client Louis Penfield—who was six foot eight.
In the living room, vintage side chairs by Milo Baughman sit opposite a coffee table by Carlo Contin for Meritalia and sofa by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia.
A view of the living room and kitchen.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Exposed structural beams are a historic nod to the loft’s previous life as a 19th-century warehouse and shipping dock. For the Copes, inspiration for creative projects never draws far from home; they named Calico after their cat, Irie.
Beside one of the building's original stained-glass windows, a handmade "church banner" by Shelby Rodeffer pays homage to Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette.
The living room, where a large industrial-style window facilitates plenty of sunlight.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
The living room features vaulted ceilings and a dramatic wall of glass which opens to a spacious balcony with gorgeous views.
A second, lofted bedroom is perched above the living room.
The living room features a dramatic stone fireplace and vaulted tongue-and-groove ceilings.
Inside, the airy home features a spacious living area with a fireplace. The 728-square-foot space makes a great city escape.
Fotsch reframed the great room, adding 14
Originally, the kitchen was in the center of the house disrupting the flow between the dining room and the living room. Flipping the rooms allowed for the addition of the fireplace in the great room.
The living area features vaulted ceilings and a lofted second floor.
In Lorne, Victoria, Austin Maynard Architects gave an old shack near the beach a modern revamp and a timber extension that allows for elevated sea views. With interiors lined in recycled Silvertop Ash, the house oozes a cozy, cabin-like feel.
A warm, voluminous family room is located off the kitchen, overlooking beautiful ocean views.
The post-and-beam construction extends out to the eaves and helps strengthen the home's indoor/outdoor connection.
The living room has a wood-burning fireplace and a wall of windows with sliding glass doors leading to the backyard.
There is also a lovely, light-filled, sitting area.
The light-filled parlor features two original wood and tile mantels (one at either end) and 11-foot ceilings.
The 28-foot corner living room features built-in bookshelves, a wood-burning fireplace, and the original herringbone floor. Five windows provide sweeping views of the surroundings.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
The formal living room features one of the home's two fireplaces.
Clare Conklin's living room features subtle earth tones and a mix of wood finishes.
The Ori Cloud Bed fits perfectly into the wooden baffles of the canopy above. The back cushions of the sofa turn into a headboard when the bed is lowered.
A variety of carefully placed windows fill the living/dining/kitchen unit with light while maintaining a sense of privacy.
The home's asymmetrical gabled roof defines the ceiling heights of the interior spaces.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.