171 Living Room Rug Floors Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Formerly used as a kitchen, the space next to the master bedroom has been turned into a living area. Retractable shades cover the glazed ceiling and are remotely controlled.
The entertainment box includes built-in shelving and a television mount.
Feng Shui principles have informed the placement of the mirrored surfaces. In the living room, the mirrored panel has been placed so that the tenant can't see himself in the mirror when sitting on the sofa.
The living area has been carved out from the space between the yellow kitchen box and the wood-paneled entertainment box.
The living spaces on the ground floor now consist of exposed steelwork with polished concrete, timber surfaces, and large Crittall windows.
Crittall windows cast playful sun squares along the floors, and deep exposed joists imbue the interiors with a warm golden glow.
Simple wood and brick contrast the industrial character of the concrete and steel, while also serving as sound dampeners.
are counterbalanced by pared-down concrete flooring and exposed bulbs. In the living area (below), a Tolomeo lamp from Artemide sits near two Longreach sofas from Thonet. A slatted cedar balustrade stretches to the ceiling of the voluminous parlor.
The new addition had to flow seamlessly into the more traditional spaces of the home.
The view out to the garden.
A pink Wassily chair reworked by Anne Suttles, Noah Marion, and Austin Powder Coating.
A sofa from Conran Shop, and a vintage boucherouite rug from Pink Rug Co.
The nave contains the living and studio space. Taking full advantage of the height and scale of the original structure, the main area allows for adaptation over the lifetime of the building.
The materials that have been used for the façade, together with the enfilade of spaces of the new volume, echo the local architecture of the elongated farmhouses in the area.
Villa K enjoys stunning views of the nearby Atlas Mountains.
"We are able to...take full advantage of the northern orientation, introducing passive solar design techniques, which allows the design to maximize its thermal efficiency," says MODO founder Michael Ong.
Thanks to cleverly designed built-in storage systems, clutter is neatly concealed throughout.
The concrete bearing walls are left exposed in the interior to tie the living spaces with the rock outcroppings.
The repurposed divider slides into place and helps trap heat generated from the wood-burning fireplace.
The timber doors of a former garage have been repurposed into a room partition that separates the main living area from the rest of the ground floor.
The Yang sectional and Dibbets rug are both from Minotti; the coffee tables are by  Eric Freyer.
What can't be obviously ascertained from this sleek reading chair? How the Northern sunlight warms the concrete slab floor in winter to help maintain a consistent internal temperature, "regularly achieving 25 degrees Celsius without heating in winter," said the architects. "It was important to create a space where the occupants could enjoy the summer warmth, as well as remaining at ease during the cold Ballarat winters."
In the living room, the horizontal lines of the timber beams at the ceiling echo the bespoke cabinetry that surrounds the gas fireplace. The dining room pendant is the Gubi Semi Pendant.
The open plan living, dining, and kitchen areas.
Rather than opting for the schematic, open-plan design of the renovated Queensland worker's cottage, the formalized living, sitting, and dining areas are compartmentalized; each room is dedicated to their function.
The living room is furnished with low-lying timber furniture from studios like Ronan & Erwan Bourollec and Liceu de Artes e Ofícios.
At the back of the living area is a volume shaped like a wooden house, which contains the kitchen, storage space, and a bedroom.
The built-in sofa was designed to be very functional. The base has storage capacity and the mattress is the size of a single bed for an extra guest. Plus, industrial grade foam and fabric ensure the cushions will hold up to wear and tear.
"I drew from the layout of Jens Risom’s cabin and laid the room out around the light that comes in through the main windows," says Kenny.
Inside the studio, sliding fir screens hide storage, utilities, and a bathroom. The ceiling and wall panels are plywood, the floor is radiant heated concrete. An Eames lounge chair from Herman Miller mingles with an IKEA sofa.
The armchair is by Ricardo Fasenello.
The interior living room, on the reverse of the double-sided fireplace.
Contemporary materials like concrete and steel are a wonderful contrast to the ancient stone walls.
In the main living areas, two vertical veils divide the high, inclined ceilings, and also serve as partitions for the kitchen, dining room, and living room without completely separating the volumes. The living room is also connected to an outdoor gazebo.
Thirty-foot ceilings feature skylights for increased natural lighting. The walls are paneled in larch and provide concert-hall quality acoustics, and the floors are a polished black concrete.
A wall of windows frames the spectacular view of the lake and imparts a dynamic sense of place throughout the open-plan living area.
The living area is small, however, the double-height ceiling give is a more vast sense of space.
Extensive glazing keeps the interiors bright and enhancing the homes' strong connection to its surroundings. <span style=
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
For the common areas, they choose more masculine, and contemporary design elements, and a darker color scheme to express the style preferences of the husband.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
The open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen are encompassed with bright vibes.
Poured concrete floors and crisp, white plastered walls have been used to give the interiors a bright and fresh look.
The floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room give the impression of being outside even while cozily enjoying a cup of tea inside. All the windows in the house are double-paned and filled with argon gas. Petra Sattler-Smith says that “even when it’s 10 below you can put your hand on them and they are still warm.” Hydronic radiant heating embedded within the concrete floors not only enables barefoot walking during the coldest months but also warms the furniture and everything else in the room.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
The hotel is furnished with rattan furniture made in Sarchí, a Costa Rican town famous for crafts.
A hanging rattan chair and Acapulco chairs add a breezy, laid-back vibe to the lounge.
Climbing vines form a green wall and ceiling in the communal lounge area, providing some privacy without disturbing the natural setting.
Arbel’s projects—both products and architectural commissions—follow a chronological numbering system. The house itself is his 23rd design, while the one-of-a-kind glass pendants that accent nearly every room like a starscape are called “28.”
Faulkner employed a strategic use of concrete, steel, wood, and glass to avoid “dating” the property.
The minimalist material palette and two-story glass wall respond to the client’s desire to see and focus on the view of the lake from the water to the treetops.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.