361 Living Room Rug Floors Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The overlapping roofs rest on structural timber window frames, allowing for column-free views through the interior.
Ashoka enlisted the services of the San Miguel de Allende–based interior studio NAMUH in selecting pieces for the interiors. The living room features a soft gray buffalo leather sofa, a reclaimed oak table with metal accents, and an Indian jute rug.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.

"I selected things that spoke to my heart," says Lexi. That included an alligator bench and a dining table passed down from her great-grandmother. "Sometimes you don’t know if things are going to work."
Against the modernist backdrop of concrete, glass, and wood, antiques and family heirlooms create an inviting, homey atmosphere. "It’s an eclectic collection, but it all works together. Everything’s so authentic. It’s all Lexi," says principal David Arnott.
The home’s high-efficiency windows are oriented to maximize natural light. At night, the floating, wood-burning fireplace creates a cozy gathering space among lounge chairs and faux-fur throws. Vintage rugs on the concrete floor add an additional layer of warmth and texture.
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) walls and ceilings give Lexi duPont’s home a cabin feel.
A large Pop and Scott paper lantern anchors a corner of the living room.
Highlight windows bring an abundance of daylight indoors while maintaining a constant connection with garden views.
The living room features a sofa by Medley Home, a rug by Dash & Albert from Annie Selke, Akari Paper Lanterns by Noguchi, and an Aluminum Group Management chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller.
The airy, light-filled interior is made of reclaimed timber and siding from a 19th-century barn.
Triple-glazed windows and doors from Zola mitigate thermal gain.
Custom pendants by GRT hang from above in the open kitchen and work area.
A flagstone patio is furnished with a table and chairs from Mater.
The ground-floor living room features a low bench adorned with objets d’art that runs beneath a window that frames views of the surrounding trees.
Large sliding glass doors between the living room and covered porch can be opened or closed as needed, depending on the weather.
The kitchen and living area leads to a traditional porch that connects to the second volume, which contains the private spaces. “We have broken up the distinction between interior and exterior spaces by using a central porch, which functions as a living area and opens up the entire home to the surroundings,” says architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed.
The vaulted ceiling is crafted from arcs of extruded clay supported by concrete, creating a pleasing rhythm.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The sitting room on the ground floor features a Mangas Space Plait modular sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Spanish brand Gan, from Hub Furniture in Melbourne. “The materials had to essentially take a back seat to the view and the internal soft furnishings, which is where all the vibrancy and color would come from, along with the occupants and what they would bring to the table,” says architect Tony Vella. “A clear undertaking from our client was to avoid painted, rendered, tiled, or applied finishes at all costs—which was not an easy task!”
A sliding timber door elegantly conceals both the television and storage in the first-floor living room.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The artwork in the first-floor living room is by contemporary figurative artist Kathrin Longhurst. Colorful pieces, such as the artwork and furniture, bring a sense of vibrancy into the otherwise minimal home.
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
Flanked by triangular windows, the organic-shaped fireplace bears a striking resemblance to another hearth in a confirmed Cody home from the period. The couple replaced the aged floor-to-ceiling windows with more energy-efficient glazing by Monumental, while replicating the original wood stocks. The driftwood coffee table is vintage. A Berber carpet warms the concrete flooring.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
Poughkeepsie’s joys include Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting the city to Highland on the west bank, as well as a booming craft-beer scene. This contemporary cottage is just the place to settle in to revel in it all. Scandinavian design simplicity juxtaposes more homey touches like plants and a wall shelf filled with colorful games and books. Roomy tables, found both indoors and out, invite plenty of farm-fresh meals upon returning from Wappinger Creek and a stroll through the landscaped gardens.
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
A Cheminees Philippe fireplace adds a rustic touch to the living space.
The ground floor is where the  clients spend most of their time. The main living space opens up to the waterfront via sliding glass doors, and the floors are burnished concrete to complement the board-formed walls.
The clients enjoy boating and kayaking and often utilize the site’s direct water access. “There’s a boathouse at the bottom of the site, so we’ve tried to clean the view up,” says architect Fraser Mudge of the framing. “We also controlled the height of it a little bit to frame the beauty of the water and the National Park, rather than the sky.”
A three-seater Ella sofa and footrest in Vega Anthracit by Sofacompany anchor the living room. The steel coffee table is by Lim and the rug is from Coral & Hive. The shelving and cabinets are custom from Holz Cabinetry. The lamp is from Vamp and the lampshade is from Skinny laMinx. The chairs are from Chair Crazy and the television is from Samsung.
In this sprawling ranch, every guest will have an individual experience. Each of the three bedrooms have been decorated with period furnishings and have a different theme. For a communal experience, cook together in the modern kitchen with quality appliances.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
A vintage Bertoia Bird chair and Bertoia Wire chair offer sunny seating alongside the living room. "We love drinking coffee every morning in our window nook," says Tyler.
The rear garden, visible from this living court, includes a vegetable patch, fruit trees, and lawn for plenty of play area.
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
Translucent louvers in the maple-clad walls and a skylight cross-ventilate the room with fresh air and bring in daylight.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
Dinwiddie placed the main living spaces at the heart of an L-shaped plan, with the floor-to-ceiling windows connecting to the veranda and the vista. A two-story element sits to one side of this central zone and holds the majority of the bedrooms, also facing the bay.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
Built with redwood, glass, red brick, and concrete, the house was originally designed by John Lautner for the Schaffer family, who used to spend time enjoying picnics under the resident oak trees. Lautner built the house horizontally around the oaks.
Resting along the crest of a volcanic crater on the little-known island of Nisyros in the Aegean Sea, Villa Nemésis marries the mystique of ancient Greece with modern design.
This midcentury gem lays in Crestwood Hills, in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, an endangered enclave of midcentury post-and-beam houses designed by A. Quincy Jones and Whitney R. Smith. Elise Loehnen and Rob Fissmer bought their house, which dates to 1950, in 2012, furnishing the living room with a Jasper sofa by Room & Board, Laccio tables by Marcel Breuer, and a wool sisal rug from Madison Flooring and Design.
For their A. Quincy Jones house in Los Angeles, architect Bruce Norelius and his partner, Landis Green, retained and restored core elements, such as the living room’s redwood paneling and concrete-block wall.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
Douglas fir beams, some of which were salvaged from the original home that sat on the property, run in perpendicular lines overhead. Certain sections of the ceiling are exposed, while others are covered in drywall. For flooring, the residents, who have two young children, selected durable polished concrete. The Sven Charme sofa is by Article and the teak bureau is vintage.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
A Metro modular sofa from Room & Board offers a comfy place to perch. A Hase Collection Tula 8191 wood stove by HearthStone strikes a balance between refined and rustic.
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
Inside, tile flooring was replaced with concrete. The freestanding, kiva-style fireplace was in working condition when the couple bought the house, but the wall of windows behind it was obscured by plantation shutters and plastic treatments. Today, the living room is bathed in sunlight and new dual-pane glazing frames the Santa Rosa Mountains in the distance.
The sectional sofa and the Biscuit rug are by EQ3.
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.