153 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Floor-to-ceiling glass walls on both sides of the main living room allow sweeping views straight through the house.
The drama of the exterior is matched by a breathtaking interior, where soaring ceilings and large stained-glass windows bring ample natural light and connection to the landscape indoors.
The picture rail and skirting board painted in khaki green frame the space, while the neutral walls make the trio of arched stone windows the standout feature of the room.
Living room: with oak herringbone floor, custom made 5 meter long tv-bench made of birch plywood. Treated with natural soap and osmo wax. Dining table also made of same materials with doubled 18 mm plywood glued together and added brass details. By creating an open space plan, the living room looks more spacious with the natural light added. LED lighting on the transition of wall/ceiling and on the tv bench.
An upper floor interior view at one of the pavilion towards the double-height living area at the other end
A soaring ceiling delivers a sense of drama to the open-plan great room.
Floor-to-ceiling Lift/Slide doors by Weiland and clerestory glazing usher the outdoors in to the open-plan living and dining areas.
Though much of the interior was gutted, the west-wall fireplace was left intact due to the risk that removal could have had on the building's structural integrity.
A massive art wall defines the entry space. The kitchen and an informal eating space are to the left of the art wall, while the dining and living areas (and connection to the backyard) are sited to the right.
Slatted wood folding doors divide the public and private areas to create visual separation without compromising the home’s inherent openness.
"The pine flooring and granite countertops are all made from relatively inexpensive local sources," say the architects, who cite the budget as the most challenging aspect of the project.
The walls are white-painted sheetrock and the floors are lined with local pine.
Black Richlite also wraps around the living area as an interior band above the wooden shelf.
In the main living area are built-in platforms with storage spaces and niches that can be filled with padding to create sofas or beds.
In the library, black plywood joinery offers a pause from the entryway before the floorplan pivots to reveal a sunken concrete living area in the original front room.
Natural light and wood features connect the existing living area to the addition.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
Original wood features mix with airy daybeds at the front of the property.
Before they began the renovation, Chan and Eayrs lived in the house for six months to get a good feel for the space.
The shallow plan helps with cross ventilation, while a deep overhang to the north provides shade for the living areas in the summer.
In the wide hallway between the kitchen and additional bedrooms is an entertainment and leisure space.
Thanks to the new large windows and crips white paint, the living room now encompasses a fresh, inviting atmosphere.
The main living room becomes a central and multi-functional zone for the entire the family.
The floor in which the living and dining rooms are located on is made of reclaimed wood. The space takes on a midcentury vibe and has been furnished with pieces from Brazilian designers from the 1950s and 60s, such as Jorge Zalszupin and Sergio Rodrigues.
Here are the masterminds behind this renovation, Robert Highsmith and his wife, Stefanie Brechbuehler—co-founders of Workstead.
This room feautres an Adrian Pearsall sofa, Workstead Sling Chairs, an antique British colonial mahogany bed that is used as a coffee table, Workstead Lodge Chandelier 3, and Jim Bindman floor lamps.
This room houses a Lawson Fenning Moreno sofa and lounge chairs, an antique mosaic-horn coffee table, and Workstead Signal globe and sconce lights.
Horner remembers his first visit to the home: "The architecture in the main living area was fantastic, and we just wanted to preserve that and concentrate on the areas of the home that were ill-considered."
In the living room, the designers preserved the existing Douglas fir paneling on the ceiling and walls, the fireplace, and the firewood niche. The cooler tones in the sofa from Design Within Reach, rug from Kush Rugs, and knitted poufs from SMG Collective balance out the wood and dial up the cozy factor.
The living room at the heart of the home has been designed using a panelized building system to reduce labor needs on the island.
A built-in bench by the window is a cozy perch for Tyler. The herringbone flooring looks like wood but is actually man-made.
The living and dining rooms were updated.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
The couple built many furnishings, such as the storage chests, out of old leftover timber.
The residents furnished the interior themselves, even hand-picking the exposed reclaimed beams from a barn in Pennsylvania. The dining table and shelving unit are 1970s vintage and the sofa is from Design Within Reach (left). The height of the top level varies from around nine to 12 feet.
Upon entering the home, guests come into a bright and airy, double-height great room. Part of the challenge for the design was to figure out how to make each space feel separate while making the entire home feel cohesive.
On one end of the top-floor communal space is a white volume that neatly contains the kitchen, pantry, and toilet.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
A sheltered patio provides the perfect place to sip wine and take in the views.
Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

Photo by Ryota Atarashi.
In Richmond, Virginia, The Broad's interior design strikes a balance between elegance and comfort.
London's sophisticated new co-working space dubbed The AllBright has a name that pays homage to former U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright and her famous remark, "There's a special place in hell for women who don't support other women."
With original steel-framed windows, beamed ceilings, warm wood-paneled walls, and a gracious floor plan it makes for a wonderful entertaining space.
The living room also offers new lighting from Restoration Hardware, a decorative fireplace, and newly installed wide-plank oak floors.
 The large arched windows allow ample natural light to flood the interiors.
The entry foyer features San Felipe tiles from Arto Brick, and the living room has all new windows with beautiful architectural lines.
Respecting the existing site, Suyama and his team left all of the trees in place. They also ensured the trees were fully protected during the excavation process.
Typical of bungalows, the entrance leads straight into the living room.
The team kept the entryway intact, but opened the living and dining spaces up to the kitchen by removing a section of the wall at the deck door. They also inserted custom-crafted shelving to enclose the modern couch and create a cozy atmosphere.
The entire parlor floor now serves as an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area.
With its walls of windows, stone fireplace, and wood floors, this living area was kept much as Emery designed it.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.