144 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Table Design Photos And Ideas

Infused with traditional materials and aesthetics, this open-plan home in Japan strengthens the bond a young family has to nature and to each other.
The sun-soaked living area is furnished with a vintage reed mat made by the Tuareg tribe of North Africa (purchased at a flea market), a Toga sofa from Ligne Roset, and a Saarinen table with Tolix red stools.
Taking advantage of the double-height space, the architects created a wall of windows to flood the living area with natural light and frame west-facing views. “At sunset, rays of light literally go all the way through the house,” note the architects.
The focal point of the living room is the large southeasterly projecting window that frames views of the town, Hautapu River, and the Ruahine Range.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
The home’s Japanese name loosely translates to “Sun House”—which is apt, given its emphasis on natural light. Three sets of full-height doors slide away to open the interior to the outdoors, while the angled roof eaves deflect unwanted solar gain in the summer without blocking access to the low winter sun.
The design of the house follows the traditional Japanese architectural concept of a hiraya—a single-story home with an engawa-inspired deck.
The compact living area is flanked by floor-to-ceiling glazing to bring the outdoors in. The show unit has been furnished with a Futón Tanoshi sofa, a Bandido Studio coffee table, and a Natural Urbano floor lamp.
As with all Cover projects, Leslie’s home features floor-to-ceiling windows, Wolf-Sub Zero appliances, integrated storage, and minimalist track lighting. The open-plan living areas are arranged axially toward views of the valley.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
Inspired by Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetics, the modern Orchid tiny house features an interior clad in three-quarter-inch maple plywood.
A look inside the post-and-beam screen porch built with locally sourced eastern white pine. The floors are Port Orford cedar.
The space after renovations, with cantilevering cabinetry along the perimeter to preserve and protect Hall's original radiant heating vents in the windowsills—an example of his innovative solutions for meeting the space's functional needs.
The studio's wraparound deck can be accessed from all sides of the building.
A family room caps the southern end of the bedroom wing and, as with all the bedrooms, features an exposed concrete barrel vault ceiling and opens up to an east-facing outdoor patio.
Tasked by John Powers and Jennifer Bostic with renovating a run-down cottage that was never meant to be lived in year round, Otto Ruano of Lead Studios transformed the space while keeping as much of it intact as possible. Potence lamps by Jean Prouvé illuminate the kitchen and living area. The bifold doors are by Loewen.
Designed for “utilizing every cubic centimeter to its utmost,” the compact cabin feels large thanks to full-height glazing and clean, minimalist design.
The House in Kyoto illuminated with select lighting at night.
The children's room is located directly above the kitchen so that they get to experience the full expanse of the house every time they descend to the ground-floor living area.
Since the house is edged in by homes on the east, west, and south sides, the architect punctuated the gabled roof with large skylights to bring daylight into the home.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
The existing wood structure and ceiling of the former saloon were completely refinished, and the exposed rafters were painted white for a brighter and more spacious feel. The old windows, floors, and finishes were replaced to create consistency with the new house.
The great room features floor-to-ceiling windows, a floating fireplace, exposed beams, lofty vaulted ceilings, and a multimillion-dollar view.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
The open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room are located on the side of the loft closest to the windows.
Full-height French doors lead from the den to the pool area.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
Inside, the airy home features a spacious living area with a fireplace. The 728-square-foot space makes a great city escape.
In Lorne, Victoria, Austin Maynard Architects gave an old shack near the beach a modern revamp and a timber extension that allows for elevated sea views. With interiors lined in recycled Silvertop Ash, the house oozes a cozy, cabin-like feel.
DS House provides its inhabitants with a relaxed, private atmosphere. Planned Living Architects' extensive use of timber complements the raw, tactile character of the in situ concrete walls.
"The idea of the building is to ‘hang’ it over the valley and open it to the valley by continuous windows," says the firm.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
Sliding glass doors open up the living room to a private patio with water views.
The architects dropped the floor of the lower level to create 10-foot-tall ceilings. The existing den and master bedroom now serve as a media room furnished with an Eero Saarinen table from Knoll, Bruno Hansen chairs, and an Original Timber Co. bench.
Walls of glass bring in views of the outdoors.
A variety of carefully placed windows fill the living/dining/kitchen unit with light while maintaining a sense of privacy.
The home's asymmetrical gabled roof defines the ceiling heights of the interior spaces.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
A view from the front of the Airstream towards the angled bathroom door in the rear. Note the small closet, perfect for hanging coats and boots, slotted between the door and the wood stove.
A wall of windows floods the living room and dining area with natural light. The room has been staged with Knoll dining chairs by Mies van der Rohe, a Platner Wire dining table, a Plycraft Lounge chair, and other vintage period-appropriate finds.
The home's large windows offer expansive views of downtown Los Angeles.
The energy-efficient Dickerman Residence by Richard Pedranti Architect boasts warm wood ceilings, midcentury-inspired furnishings, and a stately stone fireplace.
The husband-and-wife duo of Jeanine Hays and Bryan Mason are the founders of creative design agency AphroChic, which does everything from interior design to publishing to fabric and lighting design.
All built-in furnishings were designed by the architects. The height-adjustable tables are from Billiani.
The corner living/dining room offers both north and east exposures with Central Park and city views.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
“Although the LDK (living room, dining room, kitchen) faces east, it is bathed in light reflected off the hill in the afternoon,” say the architects. “With the absence of beams and sealing strips, the rafter seems to protrude from the white structural wall, making the LDK seem like a semi-outdoor veranda. The living room has become part of the garden, where you can naturally engage with the children playing or sprawling on the slope of the hill.”
Teak is used extensively throughout the home—from the flooring to the kitchen cabinetry. The dining chairs and table are from Sakura Shop.
The public lounge area in BURSA Hotel.
From the living room wall, a panel folds down to reveal a bookshelf and form a table.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.